erb816's Personal Name List

Adalind
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Anglicized), Hungarian (Rare), Popular Culture
Anglicized form of Adallindis.

The name came to prominence with Adalind Schade, a main character on the television show "Grim" (2011-2017).

Alafair
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romani
Pronounced: el-ə-fair(English)
Personal remark: nickname Allie / Ally
Rating: 27% based on 7 votes
Variant of Alafare.
Alhena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Other Scripts: الهنعه(Arabic)
Personal remark: pronounced ahl-HEH-nah
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Derived from Arabic الهنعه (al-Han'āh) "sign (on the neck of a camel)", this is the name of the third-brightest star in the constellation of Gemini.
Alkaid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino, Astronomy
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Means "the leader", derived from Arabic قائد بنات نعش qā'id bināt naʿsh, meaning "leader of the daughters of the bier". This is the traditional name of the star Eta Ursae Majoris in the constellation Ursa Major.
Allegria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "cheerfulness, joy" in Italian.
Alsephina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: al-sə-FEE-nə
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Derived from Arabic al-safīnah meaning "the ship". Alsephina, also known as Delta Velorum, is a triple star system that is a part of the constellation Vela.
Amaryllida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek (Rare)
Other Scripts: Αμαρυλλίδα(Greek)
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Greek variant of Amaryllis, from the genitive form Αμαρυλλίδος (Amaryllidos). This is also the Greek name for the amaryllis flower.
Amata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 28% based on 9 votes
Feminine form of Amatus.
Amethyst
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AM-ə-thist
Rating: 50% based on 15 votes
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix (a) and μέθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
Amyas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal remark: pronounced AM-ee-əs
Rating: 57% based on 32 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps a derivative of Amis. Alternatively, it may come from a surname that originally indicated that the bearer was from the city of Amiens in France. Edmund Spenser used this name for a minor character in his epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
Anemone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-NEHM-ə-nee
Personal remark: nickname Nemi / Nemie
Rating: 50% based on 9 votes
From the name of the anemone flower, which is derived from Greek ἄνεμος (anemos) meaning "wind".
Antigone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀντιγόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: an-TIG-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 56% based on 42 votes
Derived from Greek ἀντί (anti) meaning "against, compared to, like" and γονή (gone) meaning "birth, offspring". In Greek legend Antigone was the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta. King Creon of Thebes declared that her slain brother Polynices was to remain unburied, a great dishonour. She disobeyed and gave him a proper burial, and for this she was sealed alive in a cave.
Aphra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Personal remark: pronounced AHF-rə
Rating: 38% based on 59 votes
Meaning uncertain; possibly a variant of Afra 1, or possibly a variant of Aphrah, a biblical place name meaning "dust". This name was borne by the English writer Aphra Behn (1640-1689).
Aramis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 48% based on 29 votes
The surname of one of the musketeers in The Three Musketeers (1844) by Alexandre Dumas. Dumas based the character on the 17th-century Henri d'Aramitz, whose surname was derived from the French village of Aramits (itself from Basque aran meaning "valley").
Ardalion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Greek, Georgian (Rare), Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Ἀρδάλιον(Ancient Greek) არდალიონ(Georgian) Ардалион(Russian)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Probably derived from Greek ἀρδάλιον (ardalion) meaning "water pot". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Asia Minor.
Ariadne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀριάδνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-REE-AD-NEH(Classical Greek) ar-ee-AD-nee(English)
Rating: 68% based on 14 votes
Means "most holy", composed of the Greek prefix ἀρι (ari) meaning "most" combined with Cretan Greek ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
Arianwen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Welsh, Welsh, History (Ecclesiastical)
Pronounced: ar-YAN-wehn(Medieval Welsh, Welsh)
Rating: 43% based on 11 votes
Derived from Welsh arian "silver" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to legend, Arianwen verch Brychan was the daughter of Brychan Brycheiniog and later went on to become a saint herself.
Arrow
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AR-o, ER-o
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From the English word arrow, ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European *h₂érkʷo- "bow, arrow".
Athos
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Literature, French
Other Scripts: Άεθος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-thos(Greek Mythology, Literature) A-THOS(French)
Rating: 44% based on 27 votes
Athos was one of the Gigantes, children of Gaia, who hurled a mountain at Zeus. Zeus knocked the mountain to the ground near Macedonia, and it became Mount Athos, or the "Holy Mountain."

In "The Three Musketeers" by Père Alexandre Dumas, Athos is one of the titular characters, his name deriving from the village of Athos in the commune Athos-Aspis.

Beowulf
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Pronounced: BAY-ə-wuwlf(English)
Personal remark: nickname Wulf / Wolf
Rating: 61% based on 14 votes
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". Alternatively, the first element may be beadu "battle". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem Beowulf. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of King Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
Cadeyrn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Welsh
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
Cain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: קָיִן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAYN(English)
Rating: 46% based on 64 votes
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
Callirhoe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιρόη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIR-o-ee
Personal remark: nickname Callie
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of Greek Καλλιρόη (Kallirhoe), the Epic Greek form of Καλλιρρόη (see Kallirrhoe).
Canaan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: כְּנַעַן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-nən(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Meaning unknown. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Ham. He is said to be the ancestor of the Canaanite people.
Cassiopeia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσιόπεια, Κασσιέπεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kas-ee-ə-PEE-ə(English)
Personal remark: pronounced kas-ee-o-PAY-ə
Rating: 61% based on 9 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιόπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιέπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
Charisma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-RIZ-mə
Rating: 34% based on 7 votes
From the English word meaning "personal magnetism", ultimately derived from Greek χάρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness".
Charlize
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Afrikaans
Pronounced: shar-LEEZ
Rating: 43% based on 17 votes
Feminine form of Charles using the popular Afrikaans name suffix ize. This name was popularized by South African actress Charlize Theron (1975-), who was named after her father Charles.
Circe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κίρκη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SUR-see(English)
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κίρκη (Kirke), possibly from κίρκος (kirkos) meaning "hawk". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs, as told in Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus forced her to change them back, then stayed with her for a year before continuing his voyage.
Citrine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: sit-REEN(English) SIT-reen(English) SIT-REEN(French)
From the English word for a pale yellow variety of quartz that resembles topaz. From Old French citrin, ultimately from Latin citrus, "citron tree". It is one of the birthstones for November.
Clytemnestra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κλυταιμνήστρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: klie-təm-NEHS-trə(English)
Rating: 29% based on 10 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κλυταιμνήστρα (Klytaimnestra), from κλυτός (klytos) meaning "famous, noble" and μνηστήρ (mnester) meaning "courter, wooer". In Greek legend Clytemnestra was the wife of Agamemnon and the mother of Orestes and Electra. While her husband was away during the Trojan War she took a lover, and upon his return she had him murdered. She was subsequently killed by Orestes.
Conan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 56% based on 12 votes
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Irish "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. It was borne as a middle name by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. It is also the name of the hero of the Conan the Barbarian series of books, comics and movies, debuting 1932.
Corisande
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, French
Meaning uncertain, from the name of a character in medieval legend, possibly first recorded by Spanish writer Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo. Perhaps it was derived from an older form of Spanish corazón "heart" (e.g., Old Spanish coraçon; ultimately from Latin cor "heart", with the hypothetic Vulgar Latin root *coratione, *coraceone) or the Greek name Chrysanthe. As a nickname it was used by a mistress of King Henry IV of France: Diane d'Andoins (1554-1620), la Belle Corisande. Some usage may be generated by Jean-Baptiste Lully's opera 'Amadis' (1684; based on Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo), in which it belongs to the lover of the prince Florestan. The name was also used by Benjamin Disraeli for a character in his play 'Lothair' (1870).
Crescentia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare), Late Roman
Rating: 38% based on 16 votes
Feminine form of Crescentius. Saint Crescentia was a 4th-century companion of Saint Vitus. This is also the name of the eponymous heroine of a 12th-century German romance.
Damaris
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Δάμαρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAM-ə-ris(English)
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
Probably means "calf, heifer, girl" from Greek δάμαλις (damalis). In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul.
Danaë
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δανάη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-NA-EH(Classical Greek) DAN-ay-ee(English)
Personal remark: pronounced DA-NIE
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From Δαναοί (Danaoi), a word used by Homer to designate the Greeks. In Greek mythology Danaë was the daughter of the Argive king Acrisius. It had been prophesized to her father that he would one day be killed by Danaë's son, so he attempted to keep his daughter childless. However, Zeus came to her in the form of a shower of gold, and she became the mother of Perseus. Eventually the prophecy was fulfilled and Perseus killed Acrisius, albeit accidentally.
D'Artagnan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 35% based on 30 votes
Means "from Artagnan" in French, Artagnan being a town in southwest France. This was the name of a character in the novel The Three Musketeers (1884) by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel D'Artagnan is an aspiring musketeer who first duels with the three title characters and then becomes their friend.
Decima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: DEH-kee-ma
Personal remark: pronounced DES-i-mə
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Decimus.
Deianira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δηϊάνειρα, Δῃάνειρα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of Deianeira.
Déjanire
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), French (Cajun, Archaic), Theatre
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
French form of Deïaneira (or Deïanira, Dejanira). Déjanire (1911) is an opera (tragédie lyrique) in 4 acts composed by Camille Saint-Saëns to a libretto in French by Louis Gallet and Camille Saint-Saëns.
Demelza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British, Rare)
Pronounced: də-MEHL-zə
Personal remark: nickname Demi
Rating: 35% based on 12 votes
From a Cornish place name meaning "fort of Maeldaf". It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century. It was popularized in the 1970s by a character from the British television series Poldark, which was set in Cornwall.
Deneb
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Personal remark: pronounced DEN-əb
Rating: 19% based on 10 votes
Derived from Arabic ذنب (dhanab) meaning "tail". This is the name of a star in the constellation Cygnus.
Domino
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, English (Rare)
Pronounced: DAHM-ə-no
Rating: 35% based on 13 votes
Short form of Dominique. It was used by author Ian Fleming in his James Bond novel 'Thunderball' (1961), where the nickname belongs to Bond's Italian love interest Dominetta "Domino" Vitali (renamed Dominique "Domino" and simply Domino in the 1965 and 1983 film adaptations, respectively). A known bearer was English bounty hunter Domino Harvey (1969-2005), whose mother named her for the French model Dominique "Domino" Sanda (1951-).
Draco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δράκων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DRAY-ko(English)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
From the Greek name Δράκων (Drakon), which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
Drakon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Δράκων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 3% based on 4 votes
Greek form of Draco.
Elektra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἠλέκτρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-LEHK-TRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 44% based on 16 votes
Greek form of Electra.
Elessar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: ELL-ess-ahr
Rating: 21% based on 11 votes
Created by JRR Tolkien for his The Lord Of The Rings trilogy. This is the name, meaning Elfstone, given to Aragorn in Lórien by Galadriel and later adopted by him as King of Gondor.
Eos
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἠώς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-AWS(Classical Greek) EE-ahs(English)
Personal remark: pronounced EH-os, AY-os
Rating: 18% based on 5 votes
Means "dawn" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the dawn.
Éowyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: AY-ə-win(English)
Rating: 68% based on 9 votes
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel The Lord of the Rings (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
Esmond
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: EHZ-mənd
Rating: 29% based on 16 votes
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
Esperance
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: ES-pər-ənts
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
From an English word (now obsolete) for "hope." The battle cry of Harry Hotspur was "Esperance en Dieu," or "hope in God," which was the motto for House Percy. The French form, Espérance, is typically found in religious texts (the word espoir is far more common).
Everard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Means "brave boar", derived from the Germanic elements ebur "wild boar" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced it to England, where it joined the Old English cognate Eoforheard. It has only been rarely used since the Middle Ages. Modern use of the name may be inspired by the surname Everard, itself derived from the medieval name.
Faramir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: FAH-rah-meer
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
Meaning uncertain. Probably "sufficient jewel" from the Sindarin far meaning "sufficient, adequate" and mir meaning "jewel, precious thing." In J.R.R. Tolkien's 'The Lord of the Rings', Faramir was the son of Denethor, brother of Boromir, and eventual husband of Eowyn.
Faramond
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Rating: 32% based on 12 votes
Variant of Faramund.
Farran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FAR-ən
Rating: 41% based on 7 votes
Transferred use of the surname Farran.
Fennore
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Anglicized, Rare, Archaic)
Pronounced: FEN-awr, fə-NAWR, fə-NOR
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of Fionnúir, a modern shortening of Finnabhair (see Findabhair).
Fiordelise
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Italian
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
Medieval Italian variant of Fiordalisa.
Fortuna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Means "luck" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the personification of luck.
Freesia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FREE-zhə
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Derived from the English word for the flower.
The flower itself was named after the German physician Friedrich Freese whose surname is a variant of Friese "a Frisian".
This name has been occasionally used in the English-speaking world from the late 1800s onwards.
Gaheris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: gə-HE-ris
Rating: 16% based on 8 votes
This is the name of a character in Arthurian tales, a brother of Gawain (as well as Gareth, Mordred and Agravain), and the son of King Lot and either Belisent or Morgause. 'The earliest form of his name is so similar to the earliest form of Gareth (Gahariet) that the two brothers may have originally been the same character.' First mentioned by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, although scholars have suggested a derivation from the Welsh name Gweir, which belongs to a number of warriors in Welsh legends and can mean "hay", "collar", "circle", "loop" or "bend".
Gaia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαῖα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A(Classical Greek) GIE-ə(English) GAY-ə(English) GA-ya(Italian)
Rating: 53% based on 27 votes
From the Greek word γαῖα (gaia), a parallel form of γῆ (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
Greenlee
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Popular Culture
Pronounced: GREEN-lee(English)
Rating: 8% based on 6 votes
Transferred use of the surname Greenlee.
Hawthorn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 31% based on 13 votes
Transferred use of the surname Hawthorn.
Hereward
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon [1]
Personal remark: pronounced HER-ə-wərd
Rating: 26% based on 19 votes
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
Herod
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Ἡρῴδης, Ἡρώδης(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHR-əd(English)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
From the Greek name Ἡρῴδης (Herodes), which probably means "song of the hero" from ἥρως (heros) meaning "hero, warrior" combined with ᾠδή (ode) meaning "song, ode". This was the name of several rulers of Judea during the period when it was part of the Roman Empire. This includes two who appear in the New Testament: Herod the Great, the king who ordered the slaughter of the children, and his son Herod Antipas, who had John the Baptist beheaded.
Honesty
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Puritan)
Pronounced: AH-nes-tee
Rating: 8% based on 5 votes
From the English word "honesty" referring to "fairness and truthfulness". Also the name of a plant with purple flowers, Lunaria annua, also known as 'money plant'. Ultimately from Latin honōrāre 'honor, repute'.
Hughard
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Personal remark: pronounced HYOO-ərd
Rating: 26% based on 20 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and hard "brave, hardy".
Imelda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ee-MEHL-da
Rating: 53% based on 7 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Irmhild. The Blessed Imelda was a young 14th-century nun from Bologna.
Imlac
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: IM-lahk
Rating: 28% based on 32 votes
Transferred use of the surname Imlac.
Immanuel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, German (Rare), Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: עִמָּנוּאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: i-MA-nwehl(German)
Rating: 59% based on 25 votes
Form of Emmanuel used in most translations of the Old Testament. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher who held that duty was of highest importance.
Inara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Portuguese (Brazilian), Popular Culture
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
The name of a leading female character from the TV show Firefly and Serenity movie created by Joss Whedon.

It is sometimes claimed to be a feminine form of the Basque masculine name Inar, with the meaning "ray of light", or a feminine name of Arabic origin with the meaning "heaven sent". Both of these origins, however, seem suspicious at best.

India
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IN-dee-ə
Rating: 48% based on 26 votes
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
Io
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἰώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-AW(Classical Greek) IE-o(English)
Rating: 41% based on 12 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.
Isabeau
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval French, French (Rare), Dutch (Modern)
Rating: 48% based on 17 votes
Medieval French variant of Isabel. A famous bearer of this name was Isabeau of Bavaria (1385-1422), wife of the French king Charles VI.
Isidore
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Georgian (Rare), Jewish
Other Scripts: ისიდორე(Georgian)
Pronounced: IZ-ə-dawr(English) EE-ZEE-DAWR(French)
Rating: 40% based on 9 votes
From the Greek name Ἰσίδωρος (Isidoros) meaning "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess Isis combined with Greek δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian.

Though it has never been popular in the English-speaking world among Christians, it has historically been a common name for Jews, who have used it as an Americanized form of names such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah.

Isis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ἶσις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-sis(English)
Rating: 56% based on 8 votes
Greek form of Egyptian ꜣst (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), possibly from st meaning "throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.
Isolde
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
Personal remark: pronounced ee-ZOLD
Rating: 68% based on 12 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).

Jacquetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Rating: 36% based on 46 votes
Feminine diminutive of Jacques.
Jaye
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAY
Variant or feminine form of Jay 1.
Jewel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JOO-əl, JOOL
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name Judicaël), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
Jezebel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אִיזֶבֶל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHZ-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 33% based on 24 votes
From the Hebrew אִיזֶבֶל ('Izevel), which probably means "where is the prince?", a ritual question spoken in ceremonies honouring Baal. Alternatively, it may mean "not exalted". In the Old Testament Jezebel is the evil wife of Ahab, king of Israel. After she was thrown from a window to her death her body was eaten by dogs, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy.
Joah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יוֹאָח(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 27% based on 12 votes
Means "Yahweh is brother" in Hebrew. This is the name of four people in the Old Testament.
Judah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יְהוּדָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JOO-də(English)
Rating: 53% based on 29 votes
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדָה (Yehudah), probably derived from יָדָה (yadah) meaning "praise". In the Old Testament Judah is the fourth of the twelve sons of Jacob by Leah, and the ancestor of the tribe of Judah. An explanation for his name is given in Genesis 29:35. His tribe eventually formed the Kingdom of Judah in the south of Israel. King David and Jesus were among the descendants of him and his wife Tamar. This name was also borne by Judah Maccabee, the Jewish priest who revolted against Seleucid rule in the 2nd century BC, as told in the Books of Maccabees.

The name appears in the New Testament using the spellings Judas and Jude.

Katharyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin, KATH-rin
Rating: 21% based on 7 votes
Variant of Katherine.
Kyrielle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of Cyrielle.
Larue
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: lə-ROO
Rating: 24% based on 9 votes
Possibly a combination of the popular prefix La with the name Rue. It also coincides with the French phrase la rue meaning "the street". In America, Larue was used to some extent from the end of the 19th century until the end of World War II.
Laudine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance, French (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: low-DEE-nə(German)
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Perhaps derived from an earlier form of the Scottish place name Lothian (in Latin Lodonesia). It was first used by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for a character in his Arthurian romance 'Yvain', the Lady of the Fountain, who married Sir Yvain after he killed her husband.
Laurana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: lawr-AHN-ə, lor-AHN-ə
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Perhaps an elaboration of Laura. Laurana is one of the main characters in the "Dragonlance" book series by Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman.
Leia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek, Portuguese, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: Λεία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LAY-ə(English)
Rating: 56% based on 17 votes
Form of Leah used in the Greek Old Testament, as well as a Portuguese form. This is the name of a princess in the Star Wars movies by George Lucas, who probably based it on Leah.
Leocadia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: leh-o-KA-dhya(Spanish)
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκός (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
Leopold
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Polish
Pronounced: LEH-o-pawlt(German, Dutch) LEE-ə-pold(English) LEH-o-polt(Czech) LEH-aw-pawld(Slovak) leh-AW-pawlt(Polish)
Rating: 67% based on 23 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel Ulysses (1922).
Leyland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Transferred use of the surname Leyland. See also Leland.
Lucan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Rating: 20% based on 7 votes
From the Roman cognomen Lucanus, which was derived from the name of the city of Luca in Tuscany (modern Lucca). Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, commonly called Lucan, was a 1st-century Roman poet.
Lucretia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-KREE-shə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum meaning "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
Lumina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Pronounced: LOO-mi-nə; loo-MEE-nə
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
Derived from Latin lumina "lights", ultimately from Latin lumen "light". In the English-speaking world, this name was first recorded in the 1800s.
Lux
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: LUKS(English)
Rating: 36% based on 12 votes
Derived from Latin lux meaning "light".
Lysithea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Astronomy
Other Scripts: Λυσιθέα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: lie-SITH-ee-ə, li-SITH-ee-ə
Personal remark: pronounced lie-SITH-ee-ə
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Derived from the Greek elements λύσις (lysis) "releasing, freeing, deliverance" and θεός (theos) "god". This was the name of a minor character in Greek mythology. Also, a moon of Jupiter bears this name.
Maeleth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Μαελέθ(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 29% based on 7 votes
Form of Mahalath used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
Magenta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Theatre
Pronounced: mə-JEN-tə
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Named for the mauvish-crimson colour. The dye to make the colour was discovered and named shortly after the Battle of Magenta in 1859 (the town is situated in northern Italy). The colour may have been inspired by the colour of the uniforms worn by the French troops, or by the colour of the land soaked in blood after the battle.

Magenta was a character in “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” musical play and movie. She was a domestic maid played by Patricia Quinn.

Mahalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Personal remark: pronounced mə-HAY-lee-ə
Rating: 61% based on 11 votes
Variant of Mahala.
Medusa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Μέδουσα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: meh-DOO-sə(English)
Rating: 18% based on 10 votes
From the Greek Μέδουσα (Medousa), which was derived from μέδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over". In Greek myth this was the name of one of the three Gorgons, ugly women who had snakes for hair. She was so hideous that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone, so the hero Perseus had to look using the reflection in his shield in order to slay her.
Melicent
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Older form of Millicent.
Melisende
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval French
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Old French form of Millicent.
Merula
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mer-OO-lah(Latin) MER-oo-lah(Latin)
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Roman cognomen which meant "blackbird" from Latin merulus (cognate to French Merle).
Minelauva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Other Scripts: من العواء
Pronounced: min-ə-LAW-və, min-ə-LAWV-ə
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Traditional name in the middle ages for the star Delta Virginis in the constellation Virgo. It derives from the Arabic من العواء or min al-ʽawwāʼ, meaning "in the lunar mansion of ʽawwaʼ" (see Auva).
Navarre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 21% based on 7 votes
Nefertari
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: nehf-ər-TAHR-ee(English)
Rating: 43% based on 9 votes
From Egyptian nfrt-jrj meaning "the most beautiful". This was the name of an Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the favourite wife of Rameses II.
Oberon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: O-bər-ahn(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Variant of Auberon. Oberon was the king of the fairies in Shakespeare's comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595). A moon of Uranus bears this name in his honour.
Odin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Pronounced: O-din(English)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr meaning "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe, though he is best known from Norse sources.

In Norse mythology Odin is the highest of the gods, presiding over war, wisdom and death. He is the husband of Frigg and resides in Valhalla, where warriors go after they are slain. He is usually depicted as a one-eyed older man, carrying two ravens on his shoulders who inform him of all the events of the world. At the time of Ragnarök, the final battle, it is told that he will be killed fighting the great wolf Fenrir.

Olivette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: ahl-i-VEHT(English)
Rating: 45% based on 24 votes
Feminine form of Oliver. This was the name of the title character in the French opera Les noces d'Olivette (1879) by Edmond Audran.
Olympias
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ὀλυμπιάς(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 32% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Olympos. This was the name of the mother of Alexander the Great. It was also borne by a 4th-century saint.
Orion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὠρίων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) o-RIE-ən(English)
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
Meaning uncertain, but possibly related to Greek ὅριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
Oscar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AHS-kər(English) AWS-kar(Italian, Swedish) AWS-KAR(French)
Rating: 57% based on 11 votes
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name Osgar or its Old Norse cognate Ásgeirr, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.

This name was popularized in continental Europe by the works of the 18th-century Scottish poet James Macpherson [1]. Napoleon was an admirer of Macpherson, and he suggested Oscar as the second middle name of his godson, who eventually became king of Sweden as Oscar I. Another notable bearer was the Irish writer and humourist Oscar Wilde (1854-1900).

Osiris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ὄσιρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: o-SIE-ris(English)
Rating: 49% based on 7 votes
Greek form of the Egyptian wsjr (reconstructed as Asar, Usir and other forms), which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to wsr "mighty" or jrt "eye". In Egyptian mythology Osiris was the god of the dead and the judge of the underworld. He was slain by his brother Seth, but revived by his wife Isis.
Osric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon, English (Rare), Literature
Rating: 33% based on 11 votes
Derived from Old English os meaning "god" combined with Old English ric meaning "power, rule". This name was borne by several Anglo-Saxon kings, one of the earliest being Osric of Deira (7th century AD).

In literature, Osric is the name of a courtier in William Shakespeare's play Hamlet.

Ottilie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: aw-TEE-lyə
Personal remark: pronounced AHT-ə-lee; nickname Tilly
Rating: 66% based on 8 votes
German form of Odilia.
Ozias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ὀζίας(Ancient Greek)
Personal remark: pronounced o-ZIE-as
Rating: 39% based on 40 votes
Form of Uzziah used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
Patience
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: PAY-shəns
Rating: 50% based on 12 votes
From the English word patience, ultimately from Latin patientia, a derivative of pati "to suffer". This was one of the virtue names coined by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Penrose
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
Transferred use of the surname Penrose.
Peridot
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal remark: nickname Peri
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Taken from the name of the gemstone, whose name is of uncertain origin and meaning. A current theory, however, derives it from Anglo-Norman pedoretés, ultimately from Greek paiderôs (via Latin paederos): pais "child" and erôs "love".

As a given name, it has found occasional usage in the English-speaking world from the late 19th century onwards.

Phaedra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φαίδρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: FEED-rə(English) FEHD-rə(English)
Personal remark: pronounced FAY-drə
Rating: 57% based on 7 votes
From the Greek Φαίδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρός (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.
Phaenna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Φαέννα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
Derived from Greek φαεινός (phaeinos) meaning "shining". According to some Greek myths this was the name of one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites).
Philomena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Φιλομένα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: fil-ə-MEEN-ə(English)
Personal remark: nickname Mena
Rating: 58% based on 14 votes
From Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and μένος (menos) meaning "mind, strength, force". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in 1802 after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομήνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
Phoenix
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FEE-niks
Rating: 44% based on 14 votes
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird that appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοῖνιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
Phyllida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: FIL-i-də
Rating: 45% based on 33 votes
From Φυλλίδος (Phyllidos), the genitive form of Phyllis. This form was used in 17th-century pastoral poetry.
Pia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German, Slovene, Late Roman
Pronounced: PEE-a(Italian, Danish, Swedish, German)
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of Pius.
Poseidon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ποσειδῶν(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PO-SEH-DAWN(Classical Greek) pə-SIE-dən(English)
Personal remark: nickname Sei (Sy)
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Possibly derived from Greek πόσις (posis) meaning "husband, lord" and δᾶ (da) meaning "earth". The name first appears in Mycenaean Greek inscriptions as po-se-da-o. In Greek mythology Poseidon was the unruly god of the sea and earthquakes, the brother of Zeus. He was often depicted carrying a trident and riding in a chariot drawn by white horses.
Prentice
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PREN-tis
Rating: 25% based on 36 votes
Transferred use of the surname Prentice.
Ranulf
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Scottish form of the Old Norse name Randúlfr, a cognate of Randolf. Scandinavian settlers and invaders introduced this name to Scotland in the Middle Ages.
Renfri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: REN-free
Rating: 20% based on 9 votes
Taken from the surname Renfrew.

In the book series The Witcher, as well as the television adaptation, Renfri is an exiled princess who was born during a solar eclipse, and thus allegedly filled a prophecy along with many other girls who would bring about the end of the world. Because of this she was pursued by the obsessed sorcerer Stregobor and vilified by her stepmother, who sent thugs to kill her in the forest. Eventually she became the leader of a band of thieves and vowed vengeance on Stregobor, and Geralt of Rivia attempted to persuade her to abandon this quest.

Rhett
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: REHT
Rating: 53% based on 52 votes
From a surname, an Anglicized form of the Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel". Margaret Mitchell used this name for the character Rhett Butler in her novel Gone with the Wind (1936).
Rhona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
Possibly derived from the name of the Hebridean island Rona, which means "rough island" in Gaelic.
Ronette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: rahn-ET(English) ron-ET(English)
Rating: 25% based on 19 votes
Diminutive of Veronica, which experienced some popularity in the United States in the wake of the 60s girl group The Ronettes. The lead singer of the band's name at birth was Veronica Bennett.

Ronette can also be considered a variant of Ronnette, though that has a separate etymology.

Rowenna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh (Rare), English (Rare), Cornish (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Personal remark: pronounced roh-WEH-nə
Rating: 66% based on 37 votes
Variant of Rowena.
Sable
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: SAY-bəl
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.
Sansa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Popular Culture
Pronounced: SAHN-sə(Literature)
Rating: 35% based on 15 votes
Meaning unknown. This name was invented by author George R. R. Martin for Sansa Stark, a main character in his "Game of Thrones" book series, first released in 1996. The books were adapted as a TV series in 2011.

George R. R. Martin might have based it on Sancha or Sancia which were both common names among royalty during the Middle Ages, given that many of his character's names are variants of common medieval names.

Contrary to popular belief Sansa is not a Sanskrit name.

Sapphire
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-ie-ər
Rating: 48% based on 23 votes
From the name of the gemstone, the blue birthstone of September, which is derived from Greek σάπφειρος (sappheiros), ultimately from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir).
Scheherazade
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: shə-HEHR-ə-zahd(English)
Personal remark: nickname Zadie
Rating: 48% based on 43 votes
Anglicized form of Shahrazad.
Sethe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: SETH-ee
Personal remark: pronounced SETH-ee
Rating: 21% based on 18 votes
Created by Toni Morrison for her Pulitzer prize-winning novel "Beloved." Sethe is the mother of the title character, whom she murders out of an extreme act of love: she would rather kill her child than give it up to the hands of slavery.

It was possibly used in the novel as a female version of SETH.

Sidonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Georgian
Other Scripts: სიდონია(Georgian)
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Sidonius. This is the name of a legendary saint from Georgia. She and her father Abiathar were supposedly converted by Saint Nino from Judaism to Christianity.
Soleil
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: SAW-LAY(French)
Rating: 42% based on 16 votes
Means "sun" in French. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.
Sorsha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: SOR-shə
Rating: 45% based on 51 votes
The name of a character in Ron Howard's movie "Willow" (1988). In it, she is a princess, the daughter of the evil Queen Bavmorda. She ends up betraying her mother to serve the cause of good. George Lucas, who wrote the story for the movie, may have based Sorsha's name on either Sorcha or Saoirse.
Star
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: STAHR
Rating: 28% based on 8 votes
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.
Sylvestra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare, Archaic)
Pronounced: sil-VES-tra
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Sylvester.
Tace
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English (Latinized)
Rating: 6% based on 5 votes
Diminutive of Silence, being Latin for "to be silent." See also Tacey.
Talitha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Pronounced: TAL-i-thə(English) tə-LEE-thə(English)
Rating: 63% based on 6 votes
Means "little girl" in Aramaic. The name is taken from the phrase talitha cumi meaning "little girl arise" spoken by Jesus in order to restore a young girl to life (see Mark 5:41).
Tempest
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TEHM-pist
Rating: 31% based on 8 votes
From the English word meaning "storm". It appears in the title of William Shakespeare's play The Tempest (1611).
Teslin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Canadian, Rare), English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: TEZ-lin(Canadian English)
Rating: 32% based on 14 votes
From the name of the mountain, plateau, river, and lake in Yukon and British Columbia, Canada. It comes from the Tlingit name for the river, Teslintoo or Teslintuh, meaning "long, deep water."
Théoden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: THAY-aw-den
Rating: 40% based on 13 votes
Means "king, ruler" in Old English, probably from þeud "people" and þegen "thane, warrior" This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Théoden is the king of Rohan.
Théodred
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Medieval English
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
From the Anglo-Saxon words þeod ("people") and ræd ("counsel"). This name was used by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Théodred is the deceased son of the king of Rohan.

There were also several Catholic Bishops named Theodred in 10th-century England.

Theon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Literature, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: Θέων(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 45% based on 32 votes
Meaning uncertain. This name could be derived from the Greek noun θεός (theos) meaning "god", but it can also easily be derived from the Greek verb θέω (theo) meaning "to run fast, to fly" as well as "to shine, to gleam".

Notable bearers of this name include the Greek philosopher and mathematician Theon of Smyrna (2nd century AD) and the Greek scholar and mathematician Theon of Alexandria (4th century AD).

In modern literature, this name is best known for being the name of Theon Greyjoy, a character from the A Song of Ice and Fire series of fantasy novels written by the American author George R. R. Martin (b. 1948). He also appears in Game of Thrones (2011-2019), a television series based upon the novels.

Theophania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Θεοφάνια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 56% based on 14 votes
Feminine form of Theophanes.
Thessaly
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Thessaly is a traditional geographic and modern administrative region of Greece, comprising most of the ancient region of the same name. This name is borne by Thessaly Lerner, American stage, film and voice actress.
Thisbe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Θίσβη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the name of an ancient Greek town in Boeotia, itself supposedly named after a nymph. In a Greek legend (the oldest surviving version appearing in Latin in Ovid's Metamorphoses) this is the name of a young woman from Babylon. Believing her to be dead, her lover Pyramus kills himself, after which she does the same to herself. The splashes of blood from their suicides is the reason mulberry fruit are red.
Tiamat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Other Scripts: 𒀭𒋾𒊩𒆳, 𒀭𒌓𒌈(Akkadian Cuneiform)
Pronounced: TEE-ə-maht(English)
Rating: 36% based on 10 votes
From Akkadian tâmtu meaning "sea". In Babylonian myth Tiamat was the personification of the sea, appearing in the form of a huge dragon. By Apsu she gave birth to the first of the gods. Later, the god Marduk (her great-grandson) defeated her, cut her in half, and used the pieces of her body to make the earth and the sky.
Tigerlily
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), Literature
Pronounced: TIE-ger-lilee(British English, Literature)
Rating: 48% based on 10 votes
From the name of a several species of lily. Tiger Lily (with a space) is also the name of the Native American princess in J. M. Barrie's "Peter Pan". Primarily used as a given name in the UK.
Tirzah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
Rating: 56% based on 33 votes
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
Tissaia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ti-SAY-ə
Rating: 24% based on 9 votes
Meaning unknown. It could be based on an elaboration of Tess, or an alteration of Taisia (the Russian and Ukrainian form of Thaïs). In the fantasy series The Witcher by Andrzej Sapkowski (and the TV series adaptation), Tissaia de Vries is the Rectoress of Aretuza, a training academy for female mages, and the mentor of Yennefer.
Titania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: tie-TAY-nee-ə(American English) ti-TAH-nee-ə(British English)
Personal remark: pronounced tie-TAY-nee-ə
Rating: 45% based on 8 votes
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595) where it is the name of the queen of the fairies. This is also a moon of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
Topaz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TO-paz
Rating: 50% based on 28 votes
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τόπαζος (topazos).
Tullia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: TOOL-lya(Italian)
Rating: 23% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Tullius (see Tullio).
Uriah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אוּרִיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: yuw-RIE-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 9 votes
From the Hebrew name אוּרִיָה ('Uriyah) meaning "Yahweh is my light", from the roots אוּר ('ur) meaning "light, flame" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. In the Old Testament this is the name of a Hittite warrior in King David's army, the first husband of Bathsheba. David desired Bathsheba so he placed Uriah in the forefront of battle so he would be killed.
Veremund
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Rating: 19% based on 7 votes
Latinized form of a Germanic name, probably Waramunt, derived from war "vigilant, cautious" and mund "protection". This was the name of a 5th-century king of Galicia (from the Germanic tribe of the Suebi). It was later the name of kings of Asturias and León, though their names are usually spelled in the Spanish form Bermudo.
Viridiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Corsican (Archaic), Italian (Archaic), Galician (Archaic)
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Viridianus.
Woodrow
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: WUWD-ro
Rating: 34% based on 23 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "row of houses by a wood" in Old English. This name was popularized by American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
Xanadu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Literature
Pronounced: ZAN-ə-doo(English)
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Shangdu (meaning "Upper Capital"), the summer capital of Kublai, the fifth Great Khan of the Mongol Empire. The city, famously visited by Marco Polo in 1275, came into Western popular culture in the early 19th century via the Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem "Kubla Khan."
Xena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: ZEE-nə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 16 votes
Probably a variant of Xenia. This was the name of the main character in the 1990s television series Xena: Warrior Princess.
Yennefer
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: YEN-e-fer
Rating: 21% based on 9 votes
In the fantasy series The Witcher by Andrzej Sapkowski (and the TV series adaptation), Yennefer is a powerful mage who, embittered by a cutthroat and ungracious society, leaves the Brotherhood of Northern Mages and goes rogue. Sapkowski likely based her name on the Polish pronunciation of Jennifer.
Ygraine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 40% based on 21 votes
Variant of Igraine. This name was used in the BBC television series 'Merlin' (2008-2012).
Yorick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, English, Dutch
Pronounced: YAWR-ik(English) YAW-rik(Dutch) YO-rik(Dutch)
Rating: 37% based on 38 votes
Altered form of Jørg. Shakespeare used this name for a deceased court jester in his play Hamlet (1600).
Yselda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Occitan
Possibly a variant of Isolde.
Yvain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Rating: 36% based on 8 votes
Form of Owain used by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his Arthurian tales.
Zaurak
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 5% based on 4 votes
Means "the boat". This is the traditional name of the star Gamma Eridani in the constellation Eridanus.
Zebulon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: זְבוּלֻן(Ancient Hebrew)
Personal remark: nickname Zeb
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Variant of Zebulun.
Zenaida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Ζηναΐδα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Apparently a Greek derivative of Ζηναΐς (Zenais), which was derived from the name of the Greek god Zeus. This was the name of a 1st-century saint who was a doctor with her sister Philonella.
Zephyr
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ζέφυρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZEHF-ər(English)
Personal remark: nickname Zeph
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
From the Greek Ζέφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.
Zipporah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə(English) ZIP-ə-rə(English)
Rating: 64% based on 18 votes
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
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