erb816's Personal Name List

Áine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: A-nyə(Irish)
Personal remark: pronounced AWN-yə
Rating: 54% based on 24 votes
Means "radiance, brilliance" in Irish. This was the name of a goddess of love and fertility in Irish legend, thought to dwell at the hill of Cnoc Áine in Limerick. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Anne.
Alejandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-leh-KHAN-dra
Spanish form of Alexandra.
Alexei
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Алексей(Russian)
Pronounced: u-lyi-KSYAY
Rating: 68% based on 8 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Алексей (see Aleksey).
Almira 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian
Rating: 54% based on 14 votes
Bosnian feminine form of Al-Amir.
Amal 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: أمل(Arabic)
Pronounced: A-mal
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Means "hope, aspiration" in Arabic. It is related to Amaal.
Amélie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-MEH-LEE
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
French form of Amelia.
Aminata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Form of Aminah 1 used in western Africa.
Amparo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: am-PA-ro
Rating: 32% based on 14 votes
Means "protection, shelter, refuge" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Amparo, meaning "Our Lady of Refuge".
Anahera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Maori
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Means "angel" in Maori.
Anaïs
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-NA-EES
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
Possibly a French variant of Anahita. A famous bearer was the French writer Anaïs Nin (1903-1977), known for her diaries.
Andreas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ανδρέας(Greek) Ἀνδρέας(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: an-DREH-as(German, Swedish) ahn-DREH-ahs(Dutch) AN-DREH-AS(Classical Greek)
Rating: 65% based on 10 votes
Ancient Greek and Latin form of Andrew. It is also the form used in Modern Greek, German and Welsh.
Andrés
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Icelandic
Pronounced: an-DREHS(Spanish) AN-tryehs(Icelandic)
Rating: 52% based on 6 votes
Spanish and Icelandic form of Andrew.
Angelique
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Rating: 63% based on 8 votes
Dutch form of Angélique.
Aoife
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: EE-fyə(Irish)
Rating: 74% based on 5 votes
From Old Irish Aífe, derived from oíph meaning "beauty" (modern Irish aoibh). This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including a woman at war with Scáthach (her sister in some versions). She was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn, who spared her life on the condition that she bear him a child (Connla). Another legendary figure by this name appears in the Children of Lir as the jealous third wife of Lir.

This name is sometimes Anglicized as Eve or Eva.

Aparecida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Means "appeared" in Portuguese, taken from the Brazilian title of the Virgin Mary Nossa Senhora da Conceição Aparecida, meaning "Our Lady of the Conception Who Appeared". It refers to a statue of the Virgin Mary that was said to have been pulled from a river by fishermen in the 18th century. Our Lady of Aparecida is regarded as the patron saint of Brazil.
Araceli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-ra-THEH-lee(European Spanish) a-ra-SEH-lee(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 59% based on 27 votes
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
Ardeshir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: اردشیر(Persian)
Personal remark: nickname Desh
Rating: 25% based on 10 votes
Modern transcription of Ardashir.
Arend
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, German (Rare)
Pronounced: A-rent(Dutch)
Rating: 37% based on 9 votes
Dutch and German variant of Arnold. This is also the Dutch word for "eagle".
Ariadna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Catalan, Russian, Polish
Other Scripts: Ариадна(Russian)
Pronounced: a-RYADH-na(Spanish) ə-RYADH-nə(Catalan) a-RYAD-na(Polish)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Spanish, Catalan, Russian and Polish form of Ariadne.
Asal
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: عسل(Persian)
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
Means "honey" in Persian (of Arabic origin).
Aviva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲבִיבָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-VEE-vah
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Feminine variant of Aviv.
Ayelet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אַיֶלֶת(Hebrew)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "doe, female deer, gazelle". It is taken from the Hebrew phrase אַיֶלֶת הַשַׁחַר ('ayelet hashachar), literally "gazelle of dawn", which is a name of the morning star.
Azad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Indian, Hindi, Bengali, Azerbaijani, Turkish, Kurdish
Other Scripts: آزاد(Persian) आज़ाद(Hindi) আজাদ(Bengali) ئازاد(Kurdish Sorani)
Pronounced: aw-ZAWD(Persian)
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
Means "free" in Persian. This word has derivatives in several other languages, such as Hindi and Turkish.
Azélie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: A-ZEH-LEE
Rating: 54% based on 11 votes
Perhaps a form of Azalaïs. It was borne by Saint Marie-Azélie Guérin (1831-1877), also called Zélie, the mother of Thérèse of Lisieux.
Belén
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: beh-LEHN
Rating: 47% based on 16 votes
Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is from Hebrew בֵּית־לֶחֶם (Beit-lechem) meaning "house of bread".
Bláthnat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Personal remark: pronounced BLAW-nit
Rating: 40% based on 22 votes
Means "little flower" from Irish bláth "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix. In Irish legend she was a maiden abducted and married by Cú Roí. She was rescued by Cúchulainn, who killed her husband, but was in turn murdered by one of Cú Roí's loyal servants.
Breccán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Irish
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Derived from Irish brecc "freckled, speckled" combined with a diminutive suffix, making it a cognate of Brychan. This was a common name in early Ireland, borne by at least 13 saints.
Briseida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 33% based on 12 votes
Form of Briseis used in medieval tales about the Trojan War.
Brynja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic, Old Norse
Pronounced: PRIN-ya(Icelandic)
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Means "armour" in Old Norse.
Candelaria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kan-deh-LA-rya
Rating: 51% based on 7 votes
Means "Candlemas" in Spanish, ultimately derived from Spanish candela "candle". This name is given in honour of the church festival of Candlemas, which commemorates the presentation of Christ in the temple and the purification of the Virgin Mary.
Catrinel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of Ecaterina.
Chiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KYA-ra
Rating: 70% based on 9 votes
Italian form of Clara. Saint Chiara (commonly called Saint Clare in English) was a follower of Saint Francis of Assisi.
Dariush
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: داریوش(Persian)
Pronounced: dawr-YOOSH
Rating: 30% based on 10 votes
Modern Persian form of Dārayavahush (see Darius).
Demyan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Демьян(Russian) Дем'ян(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: dyi-MYAN(Russian) dehm-YAHN(Ukrainian)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of Damian.
Devora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: דְּבוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Personal remark: pronounced DEV-(ə)-rə
Rating: 36% based on 11 votes
Alternate transcription of Hebrew דְּבוֹרָה (see Devorah).
Dieudonnée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: DYUU-DAW-NEH
Personal remark: pronounced DYOO-də-nay
Rating: 46% based on 25 votes
Feminine form of Dieudonné.
Eamon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EH-mən
Rating: 54% based on 13 votes
Variant of Éamonn.
Eilidh
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish Gaelic [1]
Pronounced: EH-li
Personal remark: pronounced AY-lee
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Eilionoir, also taken to be a Gaelic form of Helen.
Eleftheria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ελευθερία(Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Eleftherios.
Eleni
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ελένη(Greek)
Pronounced: eh-LEHN-ee
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Modern Greek form of Helen.
Elettra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-LEHT-tra
Italian form of Electra.
Eleuterio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: eh-lew-TEH-ryo(Spanish)
Spanish and Italian form of Eleutherius.
Elio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: EH-lyo
Rating: 59% based on 16 votes
Italian form of Aelius or Helios.
Eliseo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: eh-lee-ZEH-o(Italian) eh-lee-SEH-o(Spanish)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Italian and Spanish form of Elisha.
Elouan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton, French
Possibly from a Breton word meaning "light". This name was borne by an obscure 6th-century saint who is now venerated mainly in Brittany and Cornwall.
Elowen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Means "elm tree" in Cornish. This is a recently coined Cornish name.
Eluned
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: ehl-IN-ehd, ehl-EEN-ehd
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Derived from Welsh eilun meaning "image, likeness, idol". This was the name of a legendary 5th-century Welsh saint, also known as Eiliwedd, one of the supposed daughters of Brychan Brycheiniog.
Emperatriz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehm-peh-ra-TREETH(European Spanish) ehm-peh-ra-TREES(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 53% based on 10 votes
Means "empress" in Spanish.
Endellion
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Cornish
Rating: 48% based on 28 votes
English form of Endelienta. Known bearers include English artist Endellion Lycett Green (1969-) and Florence Rose Endellion Cameron (2010-), British Prime Minister David Cameron's fourth child, whose second middle name was given in honour of the Cornish village of St Endellion.
Ensio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EHN-see-o
Rating: 34% based on 8 votes
Derived from Finnish ensi meaning "first".
Eseld
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 46% based on 12 votes
Cornish form of Iseult.
Esmeralda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
Esperanza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ehs-peh-RAN-tha(European Spanish) ehs-peh-RAN-sa(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 74% based on 28 votes
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia, which was derived from sperare "to hope".
Esten
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Variant of Øystein.
Fairuza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic (Rare)
Rating: 48% based on 12 votes
Variant of Fayruz.
Faris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Bosnian
Other Scripts: فارس(Arabic)
Pronounced: FA-rees(Arabic)
Rating: 40% based on 8 votes
Means "horseman, knight" in Arabic.
Feia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, West Frisian, East Frisian (Archaic)
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Feie.
Fenna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Frisian
Rating: 45% based on 18 votes
Feminine form of Fen 2.
Fernanda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: fehr-NAN-da(Spanish)
Rating: 47% based on 6 votes
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian feminine form of Ferdinand.
Fiadh
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Modern)
Pronounced: FYEE-ə
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Means "wild, untamed" (modern Irish fia) or "respect" in Irish.
Flutura
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Means "butterfly" in Albanian.
Fortunata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: for-too-NA-ta(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Fortunato.
Francesca Pia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Combination of Francesca and Pia.
Frediano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: freh-DYA-no
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Italian form of the Roman name Frigidianus, which was derived from Latin frigidus "cold". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish bishop who made a pilgrimage to Rome and settled as a hermit on Mount Pisano.
Frida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: FREE-dah(Swedish)
Rating: 83% based on 7 votes
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
Gaioz
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: გაიოზ(Georgian)
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Georgian form of Gaius.
Gauvain
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GO-VEHN(French)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of Gawain used in the works of Chrétien de Troyes.
Gethin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Means "dark-skinned, swarthy" in Welsh.
Ginevra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jee-NEH-vra
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Italian form of Guinevere. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
Gwenaëlle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: GWEH-NA-EHL(French)
Rating: 46% based on 14 votes
Feminine form of Gwenaël.
Hassan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Other Scripts: حسّان(Arabic, Persian, Urdu)
Pronounced: has-SAN(Arabic)
Rating: 42% based on 9 votes
Means "beautifier, improver" in Arabic. Hassan ibn Thabit was a 7th-century poet who was a companion of the Prophet Muhammad. This name is sometimes transcribed as Hasan, though the two names are spelled distinctly in Arabic.
Hedra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: HEH-dra
Derived from Cornish Hedra "October". This is a recent coinage.
Henna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: HEHN-nah
Rating: 38% based on 17 votes
Finnish feminine form of Heinrich (see Henry).
Hinata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 日向, 陽向, 向日葵, etc.(Japanese Kanji) ひなた(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KHEE-NA-TA
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
From Japanese 日向 (hinata) meaning "sunny place", 陽向 (hinata) meaning "toward the sun", or a non-standard reading of 向日葵 (himawari) meaning "sunflower". Other kanji compounds are also possible. Because of the irregular readings, this name is often written using the hiragana writing system.
Ilyas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: إلياس(Arabic)
Pronounced: eel-YAS
Rating: 52% based on 13 votes
Arabic form of Elijah.
Indira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Other Scripts: इन्दिरा(Sanskrit) इन्दिरा, इंदिरा(Hindi) इंदिरा(Marathi) ಇಂದಿರಾ(Kannada) இந்திரா(Tamil)
Pronounced: IN-di-ra(Hindi)
Rating: 64% based on 7 votes
Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).
Inessa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Инесса(Russian) Інесса(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: i-NEHS-sə(Russian)
Personal remark: pronounced i-NYES-ə
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of Inés.
'Isam
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عصام(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘ee-SAM
Rating: 37% based on 19 votes
Means "security, pledge" in Arabic.
Isidro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ee-SEE-dhro
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Spanish variant of Isidore.
Izumi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) いずみ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: EE-ZOO-MEE
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (izumi) meaning "fountain, spring". This name can also be constructed from other combinations of kanji.
Javed
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Urdu
Other Scripts: جاود(Persian) جاوید(Urdu)
Rating: 39% based on 10 votes
Means "eternal" in Persian.
Javier
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kha-BYEHR
Rating: 60% based on 21 votes
Spanish form of Xavier.
Johan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Pronounced: YOO-an(Swedish) YUW-hahn(Norwegian) YO-hahn(Dutch)
Rating: 51% based on 8 votes
Scandinavian and Dutch form of Iohannes (see John).
Johannes
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Pronounced: yo-HA-nəs(German) yo-HAH-nəs(Dutch) yo-HAN-əs(Danish) YO-hahn-nehs(Finnish)
Rating: 65% based on 14 votes
Latin form of Greek Ioannes (see John). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
Judicaël
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: ZHUY-DEE-KA-EHL(French)
French form of the Old Breton name Iudicael, derived from the elements iudd "lord" and hael "generous". This was the name of a 7th-century Breton king, also regarded as a saint.
Kadiatou
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Form of Khadija used in parts of French-influenced western Africa.
Kaleo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Means "sound, voice" from Hawaiian ka "the" and leo "sound, voice".
Katarin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Breton form of Katherine.
Katarzyna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ka-ta-ZHI-na
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Polish form of Katherine.
Kenzo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese, French (Modern)
Other Scripts: 謙三, 健三, 賢三(Japanese Kanji) けんぞう(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KEWN-ZO(Japanese)
Rating: 20% based on 5 votes
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 謙三 or 健三 or 賢三 (see Kenzō). Use of the name in France can probably be attributed to the fashion brand Kenzo, founded in 1970 by the Japanese-French designer Kenzō Takada (1939-).
Kerensa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 60% based on 38 votes
Means "love" in Cornish.
Lazare
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LA-ZAR
French form of Lazarus.
Lefteris
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Λευτέρης(Greek)
Short form of Eleftherios.
Leif
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: LAYF
Personal remark: pronounced LAYF
Rating: 56% based on 36 votes
From the Old Norse name Leifr meaning "descendant, heir". Leif Eriksson was a Norse explorer who reached North America in the early 11th century. He was the son of Erik the Red.
Leilani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: lay-LA-nee
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Means "heavenly flowers" or "royal child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Leocadia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: leh-o-KA-dhya(Spanish)
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκός (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
Líadan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Pronounced: LEE-din
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Possibly from Old Irish líath meaning "grey". According to an Irish tale this was the name of a poet who became a nun, but then missed her lover Cuirithir so much that she died of grief. The name was also borne by a 5th-century saint, the mother of Saint Ciarán the Elder.
Loïc
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: LAW-EEK(French)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Breton form of Louis.
Loredana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Romanian
Rating: 54% based on 18 votes
Used by the French author George Sand for a character in her novel Mattea (1833) and later by the Italian author Luciano Zuccoli in his novel L'amore de Loredana (1908). It was possibly based on the Venetian surname Loredan, which was derived from the place name Loreo.
Lourdes
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: LOOR-dhehs(Spanish) LOR-dhehs(Spanish) LOORD(French) LOORDZ(English)
Personal remark: pronounced LOOR-des
Rating: 38% based on 21 votes
From the name of a French town. It became a popular center of pilgrimage after a young girl from the town had visions of the Virgin Mary in a nearby grotto.
Lucresse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), French (African, Rare), English (Rare, Archaic)
Medieval variant of Lucrèce (see Lucretia), still occasionally found in French-speaking African countries.
Lucrezia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: loo-KREHT-tsya
Rating: 73% based on 6 votes
Italian form of Lucretia.
Ludovic
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: LUY-DAW-VEEK
Rating: 38% based on 6 votes
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of Ludwig. This was the name of an 1833 opera by the French composer Fromental Halévy.
Lumi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: LOO-mee
Rating: 53% based on 18 votes
Means "snow" in Finnish.
Madailéin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Personal remark: pronounced MAD-ə-layn
Rating: 50% based on 21 votes
Irish form of Magdalene.
Maëlys
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MA-EH-LEES
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Maël, possibly influenced by the spelling of Mailys.
Maiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Tupi
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From Tupi maya arya meaning "great-grandmother".
Máire
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: MAH-ryə, MA-ryə
Personal remark: pronounced MAWR-yə
Rating: 51% based on 18 votes
Irish form of Maria (see Mary). The form Muire is used to refer to the Virgin Mary.
Marjolaine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-ZHAW-LEHN
Personal remark: pronounced MAHR-zho-layn
Rating: 60% based on 9 votes
Means "marjoram" in French. Marjoram is a minty herb.
Mayu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 真優, 満夕, etc.(Japanese Kanji) まゆ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: MA-YOO
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" or (ma) meaning "full" combined with (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yu) meaning "evening". This name can also be constructed from other kanji combinations.
Meritxell
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: mə-ree-CHEHL
From the name of a village in Andorra where there is a sanctuary dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The name of the village may derive from Latin meridies meaning "midday".
Miguel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: mee-GHEHL(Spanish) mee-GEHL(European Portuguese) mee-GEW(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Michael. A notable bearer of this name was Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1547-1616), the Spanish novelist and poet who wrote Don Quixote.
Mireille
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch
Pronounced: MEE-RAY(French)
Rating: 79% based on 8 votes
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem Mirèio (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire". It is spelled Mirèlha in classical Occitan orthography. A notable bearer is the French singer Mireille Mathieu (1946-).
Mirèio
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Occitan
Rating: 53% based on 8 votes
Occitan (Mistralian) form of Mireille.
Nadav
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: נָדָב(Hebrew)
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
Hebrew form of Nadab.
Nadezhda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Надежда(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nu-DYEZH-də(Russian)
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Means "hope" in Russian and Bulgarian.
Nafiset
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Circassian
Other Scripts: Нэфисэт(Western Circassian, Eastern Circassian)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Circassian form of Nafisa.
Naiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: nie-A-ra
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
From the Basque name of the Spanish city of Nájera, which is Arabic in origin. In the 12th century there was a reported apparition of the Virgin Mary in a nearby cave.
Nasim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu
Other Scripts: نسيم(Arabic) نسیم(Urdu)
Pronounced: na-SEEM(Arabic)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
Means "breeze" in Arabic.
Nasrin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Bengali
Other Scripts: نسرین(Persian) নাসরীন(Bengali)
Pronounced: nas-REEN(Persian)
Rating: 52% based on 26 votes
Means "wild rose" in Persian.
Navid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian, Arabic
Other Scripts: نوید(Persian) نويد(Arabic)
Pronounced: na-WEED(Arabic)
Rating: 48% based on 13 votes
Means "good news" in Persian.
Navin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam
Other Scripts: नवीन(Hindi, Marathi) ನವೀನ್(Kannada) నవీన్(Telugu) நவீன்(Tamil) നവീൻ(Malayalam)
Rating: 41% based on 10 votes
Means "new" in Sanskrit.
Nayeli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Zapotec (Hispanicized), Spanish (Mexican)
Rating: 60% based on 22 votes
Possibly from Zapotec nadxiie lii meaning "I love you" or nayele' meaning "open".
Nazar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Turkmen, Armenian
Other Scripts: Назар(Russian, Ukrainian) Նազար(Armenian)
Pronounced: nah-ZAHR(Armenian)
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Russian, Ukrainian, Turkmen and Armenian form of Nazarius.
Nedelya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Неделя(Bulgarian)
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Means "Sunday" in Bulgarian.
Nerea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque, Spanish
Pronounced: neh-REH-a
Possibly from Basque nere, a dialectal variant of nire meaning "mine". Alternatively, it could be a feminine form of Nereus. This name arose in Basque-speaking regions of Spain in the first half of the 20th century, though it is now popular throughout the country.
Niamh
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: NYEE-əv(Irish) NYEEV(Irish) NYEE-əw(Irish)
Personal remark: pronounced NEEV
Rating: 64% based on 27 votes
Means "bright" in Irish. She was the daughter of the sea god Manannán mac Lir in Irish legends. She fell in love with the poet Oisín, the son of Fionn mac Cumhaill. It has been used as a given name for people only since the early 20th century.
Nicanor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized), Spanish
Other Scripts: Νικάνωρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: nee-ka-NOR(Spanish)
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
From the Greek name Νικάνωρ (Nikanor), which was derived from νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man". This name was borne by several notable officers from ancient Macedon.
Nikolai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE(Russian)
Rating: 61% based on 9 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see Nikolay).
Nimet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Turkish form of Nimat.
Nizhóní
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Navajo
Rating: 33% based on 7 votes
From Navajo nizhóní meaning "beautiful" [1].
Noelani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: no-eh-LA-nee
Rating: 58% based on 9 votes
Means "heavenly mist" from Hawaiian noe "mist" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Nolwenn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the Breton phrase Noyal Gwenn meaning "holy one from Noyal". This was the epithet of a 6th-century saint and martyr from Brittany.
Nuria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: NOO-rya
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Núria.
Olimpiada
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Олимпиада(Russian) Олімпіада(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: u-lyim-pyi-A-də(Russian)
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of Olympias.
Oona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Finnish
Pronounced: OO-nə(English) O-nah(Finnish)
Rating: 38% based on 12 votes
Anglicized form of Úna, as well as a Finnish form.
Ottavia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ot-TA-vya
Rating: 73% based on 10 votes
Italian form of Octavia.
Perran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Personal remark: nickname Perry
Rating: 38% based on 25 votes
Variant of Piran.
Pherick
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Personal remark: pronounced fə-RIK (Manx)
Rating: 29% based on 22 votes
Manx form of Patrick.
Pia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German, Slovene, Late Roman
Pronounced: PEE-a(Italian, Danish, Swedish, German)
Rating: 28% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of Pius.
Pilar
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pee-LAR
Rating: 53% based on 23 votes
Means "pillar" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María del Pilar, meaning "Mary of the Pillar". According to legend, when Saint James the Greater was in Saragossa in Spain, the Virgin Mary appeared on a pillar.
Purnima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Tamil, Kannada
Other Scripts: पूर्णिमा(Hindi, Marathi) পূর্ণিমা(Bengali) பூர்ணிமா(Tamil) ಪೂರ್ಣಿಮಾ(Kannada)
Rating: 29% based on 19 votes
Means "full moon" in Sanskrit.
Queralt
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: kə-RAL
Rating: 39% based on 18 votes
From the name of a Spanish sanctuary (in Catalonia) that is devoted to the Virgin Mary.
Quetzaly
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Variant of Quetzalli.
Ramon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: rə-MON
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Catalan form of Raymond.
Raoul
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Italian
Pronounced: RA-OOL(French)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Raul
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Estonian
Pronounced: ru-OOL(European Portuguese) ha-OO(Brazilian Portuguese) ra-OOL(Italian) RA-ool(Italian)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Portuguese, Italian, Romanian and Estonian form of Radulf (see Ralph).
Reijo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: RAY-yo
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Finnish form of Gregory.
Remei
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: rə-MAY
Rating: 33% based on 9 votes
Means "remedy" in Catalan, a Catalan equivalent of Remedios.
Roan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Frisian
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of Ronne.
Romilda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
Ronit 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: רוֹנִית(Hebrew)
Rating: 39% based on 12 votes
Strictly feminine form of Ron 2.
Ronja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Finnish
Pronounced: RON-yah(Swedish)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Invented by Swedish children's author Astrid Lindgren, who based it on the middle portion of Juronjaure, the name of a lake in Sweden. Lindgren used it in her 1981 book Ronia the Robber's Daughter (Ronia is the English translation).
Rosenda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ro-SEHN-da
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Rosendo.
Rozenn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Means "rose" in Breton.
Rupinder
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian (Sikh)
Other Scripts: ਰੁਪਿੰਦਰ(Gurmukhi)
Means "greatest beauty" from Sanskrit रूप (rupa) meaning "beauty, form" combined with the name of the Hindu god Indra, used here to mean "greatest".
Ruxandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Romanian form of Roxana.
Saira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: سائرہ(Urdu)
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Possibly means "traveller" in Arabic.
Saoirse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SEER-shə
Rating: 66% based on 26 votes
Means "freedom" in Irish Gaelic. It was first used as a given name in the 20th century.
Saorla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SAYR-la, SEER-la
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant of Saorfhlaith. It means free princess or free noblewoman derived from Irish saor meaning "free" and Irish flaith meaning "princess, nobelwoman".
Sayuri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 小百合, etc.(Japanese Kanji) さゆり(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SA-YOO-REE
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From Japanese (sa) meaning "small" and 百合 (yuri) meaning "lily". This name can also be composed of other kanji combinations.
Senara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Pronounced: ze-NAH-rah
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From the name of the patron saint of Zennor, a village in Cornwall, which is of obscure origin. Conceivably it may be derived from the Breton name Azenor or the old Celtic Senovara. According to local legend Saint Senara was originally Princess Azenor of Brest in Lower Brittany, the mother of Saint Budoc. She is also said to have been a mermaid before her conversion (though even after becoming a Christian, "she continued to pine for the sea"). This name was given to 52 girls born in England and Wales in the years 1916-2005.
Serge
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEHRZH
Rating: 44% based on 8 votes
French form of Sergius.
Sevastian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Севастьян(Russian)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Севастьян (see Sevastyan).
Shahrazad
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian (Rare), Arabic
Other Scripts: شهرزاد(Persian, Arabic)
Pronounced: shah-ra-ZAD(Arabic)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Means "free city" from the Persian elements شهر (shahr) meaning "city" and آزاد (azad) meaning "free". This is the name of the fictional storyteller in The 1001 Nights. She tells a story to her husband the king every night for 1001 nights in order to delay her execution.
Shireen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: شیرین(Persian)
Rating: 44% based on 10 votes
Alternate transcription of Persian شیرین (see Shirin).
Shulamit
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שׁוּלַמִּית(Hebrew)
Modern Hebrew form of Shulammite.
Sigalit
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: סִיגָלִית(Hebrew)
Rating: 39% based on 8 votes
Variant of Sigal.
Silvestra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: seel-VEH-stra(Italian)
Feminine form of Silvester.
Síofra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHEE-frə
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Means "elf, sprite" in Irish. This name was created in the 20th century.
Solenne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: SO-LEN(French) so-LEN(Breton)
Rating: 58% based on 28 votes
Variant of Solène.
Sólja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Faroese
Pronounced: SUUL-ya
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "buttercup flower" in Faroese (genus Ranunculus). The buttercup is the national flower of the Faroe Islands.
Solveig
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Pronounced: SOOL-vie(Norwegian) SOOL-vay(Swedish)
Personal remark: pronounced SOL-vay
Rating: 60% based on 35 votes
From an Old Norse name, which was derived from the elements sól "sun" and veig "strength". This is the name of the heroine in Henrik Ibsen's play Peer Gynt (1876).
Sonja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Соња(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: ZAWN-ya(German) SON-yah(Finnish)
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Form of Sonya in various languages.
Steffan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 59% based on 25 votes
Welsh form of Stephen.
Stellan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 62% based on 25 votes
Meaning unknown, perhaps related to Old Norse stilling "calm", or perhaps of German origin.
Sunniva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 57% based on 33 votes
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
Sylvie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Czech
Pronounced: SEEL-VEE(French) SIL-vi-yeh(Czech)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
French and Czech form of Silvia.
Taisia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Таисия(Russian) Таїсія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: tu-EE-syi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Alternate transcription of Russian Таисия or Ukrainian Таїсія (see Taisiya).
Taliesin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: tal-YEH-sin(Welsh) tal-ee-EHS-in(English)
Rating: 55% based on 8 votes
Means "shining brow", derived from Welsh tal "brow, head" and iesin "shining, radiant". This was the name of a semi-legendary 6th-century Welsh poet and bard, supposedly the author of the collection of poems the Book of Taliesin. He appears briefly in the Welsh legend Culhwch and Olwen and the Second Branch of the Mabinogi. He is the central character in the Tale of Taliesin, a medieval legend recorded in the 16th century, which tells how Ceridwen's servant Gwion Bach was reborn to her as Taliesin; how he becomes the bard for Elffin; and how Taliesin defends Elffin from the machinations of the king Maelgwn Gwynedd.
Taras
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Тарас(Ukrainian, Russian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: tu-RAS(Russian)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Ukrainian, Russian and Belarusian form of the Greek name Ταράσιος (Tarasios), which possibly means "from Taras". Taras was an Italian city, now called Taranto, which was founded by Greek colonists in the 8th century BC and was named for the Greek mythological figure Taras, a son of Poseidon. Saint Tarasios was an 8th-century bishop of Constantinople. It was also borne by the Ukrainian writer and artist Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861).
Taymuraz
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ossetian
Other Scripts: Таймураз(Ossetian)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Ossetian form of Tahmuras.
Tercero
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: tehr-THEH-ro(European Spanish) tehr-SEH-ro(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 29% based on 15 votes
Means "third" in Spanish. This name was traditionally given to the third child born.
Tesni
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 52% based on 17 votes
Means "warmth" in Welsh.
Tiernan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 45% based on 13 votes
Anglicized form of Tighearnán.
Tiomóid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Personal remark: pronounced tim-OHD
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Irish form of Timothy, occurring in some Irish translations of the Bible. It is not commonly used as a given name.
Tsisana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ცისანა(Georgian)
Pronounced: TSEE-SAH-NAH
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Probably derived from Georgian ცის (tsis) meaning "of the sky", the genitive case of ცა (tsa) meaning "sky, heaven". This is also an alternative Georgian word for the forget-me-not flower.
Vadim
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Вадим(Russian)
Pronounced: vu-DYEEM
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Meaning unknown. It is used as a Russian form of Bademus, but it may actually be derived from the Slavic name Vadimir or else from an Old Norse source.
Vaiva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
From Lithuanian vaivorykštė meaning "rainbow".
Valdemar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Finnish
Pronounced: VAHL-deh-mahr(Finnish)
Scandinavian form of Waldemar. This was the name of four kings of Denmark.
Valente
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish (Mexican), Portuguese (Rare)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Valens.
Velia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: VEH-lya
Rating: 76% based on 5 votes
From the Roman family name Velius, which possibly means "concealed" in Latin.
Verdiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Medieval Italian, Venetian
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Contracted form of Veridiana, which itself is a variant form of Viridiana. This was the name of an Italian saint from the 13th century AD.
Verena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Late Roman
Pronounced: veh-REH-na(German)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Possibly related to Latin verus "true". This might also be a Coptic form of the Ptolemaic name Berenice. Saint Verena was a 3rd-century Egyptian-born nurse who went with the Theban Legion to Switzerland. After the legion was massacred she settled near Zurich.
Véronique
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: VEH-RAW-NEEK
Rating: 69% based on 8 votes
French form of Veronica.
Veryan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 40% based on 22 votes
From the name of a Cornish town, which is taken from Sen Veryan meaning "Saint Veryan", a Cornish corruption of Severian, itself a corrupted form of Symphorian (the saint to whom the village church is dedicated).
Vidar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Norse Mythology
Pronounced: VEE-dahr(Swedish)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From Old Norse Víðarr, which was possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, Ragnarök, it is said he will avenge his father's death by slaying the wolf Fenrir.
Viridiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Corsican (Archaic), Italian (Archaic), Galician (Archaic)
Rating: 10% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Viridianus.
Virva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: VEER-vah
Rating: 31% based on 23 votes
Possibly derived from Finnish virvatuli meaning "will o' the wisp". In folklore, will o' the wisp is a floating ball of light that appears over water.
Vissarion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian (Archaic), Greek
Other Scripts: Виссарион(Russian) Βησσαρίων(Greek)
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Russian form and Modern Greek transcription of Bessarion.
Viveca
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, English
Pronounced: VEE-veh-kah(Swedish) VIV-i-kə(English)
Rating: 58% based on 22 votes
Variant of Viveka.
Vivek
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, Malayalam, Bengali
Other Scripts: विवेक(Hindi, Marathi) વિવેક(Gujarati) விவேக்(Tamil) ವಿವೇಕ್(Kannada) వివేక్(Telugu) വിവേക്(Malayalam) বিবেক(Bengali)
Means "wisdom, distinction, discrimination" in Sanskrit.
Willemina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: vi-lə-MEE-nah
Rating: 58% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of Willem.
Winoc
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Breton
Variant of Gwenneg.
Xiomara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: syo-MA-ra
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Possibly a Spanish form of Guiomar.
Yasmina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Spanish (Modern), French (Modern)
Other Scripts: ياسمينة(Arabic)
Pronounced: yas-MEE-nah(Arabic)
Rating: 68% based on 6 votes
Variant of Yasmin.
Yocheved
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יוֹכֶבֶד(Hebrew)
Personal remark: pronounced yo-HEV-ed; yo-KHEV-ed
Rating: 48% based on 21 votes
Hebrew form of Jochebed.
Yohannes
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Eastern African, Amharic
Other Scripts: ዮሐንስ(Amharic)
Rating: 61% based on 7 votes
Amharic form of John.
Yunus Emre
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Pronounced: yoo-NOOS ehm-REH
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Combination of Yunus and Emre, given in reference to the 13th-century poet.
Ziva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זִיוָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Ziv.
Zofia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: ZAW-fya
Rating: 48% based on 6 votes
Polish form of Sophia.
Zviad
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ზვიად(Georgian)
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Derived from Georgian ზვიადი (zviadi) meaning "proud, arrogant".
Zyanya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Zapotec
Rating: 32% based on 9 votes
Possibly means "forever, always" in Zapotec. It appears in the novel Aztec (1980) by the American author Gary Jennings.
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