Dragon_Clarinet's Personal Name List

Aderyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Personal remark: ah-DARE-in
Rating: 48% based on 16 votes
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
Adrasteia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀδράστεια(Ancient Greek)
Personal remark: ad-ra-STAY-uh
Rating: 34% based on 15 votes
Feminine form of Adrastos. In Greek mythology this name was borne by a nymph who fostered the infant Zeus. This was also another name of the goddess Nemesis.
Agrafena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аграфена(Russian)
Pronounced: u-gru-FYEH-nə
Personal remark: ah-grah-FEE_nah
Rating: 26% based on 12 votes
Russian form of Agrippina.
Alethea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-ə-THEE-ə, ə-LEE-thee-ə
Personal remark: I like the spelling Aletheia - al-eh-THEE-ah
Rating: 53% based on 15 votes
Derived from Greek ἀλήθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 16th century.
Anatolia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 36% based on 14 votes
Feminine form of Anatolius. This was the name of a 3rd-century Italian saint and martyr. This is also a place name (from the same Greek origin) referring to the large peninsula that makes up the majority of Turkey.
Andromache
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀνδρομάχη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MA-KEH(Classical Greek)
Personal remark: Also smitten by this.
Rating: 35% based on 15 votes
Derived from the Greek elements ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) and μάχη (mache) meaning "battle". In Greek legend she was the wife of the Trojan hero Hector. After the fall of Troy Neoptolemus killed her son Astyanax and took her as a concubine.
Andromeda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀνδρομέδα, Ἀνδρομέδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MEH-DA(Classical Greek) an-DRAH-mi-də(English)
Rating: 54% based on 19 votes
Derived from Greek ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) combined with one of the related words μέδομαι (medomai) meaning "to be mindful of, to provide for" or μέδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
Annora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 64% based on 17 votes
Medieval English variant of Honora.
Apolline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-PAW-LEEN
Rating: 33% based on 10 votes
French form of Apollonia.
Artemisia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀρτεμισία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 44% based on 13 votes
Feminine form of Artemisios. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
Augusta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, English, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: ow-GOOS-ta(Italian) ə-GUS-tə(English) ow-GUWS-ta(German)
Rating: 60% based on 21 votes
Feminine form of Augustus. It was introduced to Britain when King George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
Aureliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Ancient Roman
Rating: 47% based on 16 votes
Feminine form of Aurelianus.
Aurélie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-REH-LEE
Personal remark: ow-ray-LEE
Rating: 56% based on 13 votes
French feminine form of Aurelius.
Austėja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Personal remark: ow-STAY-ah
Rating: 39% based on 12 votes
Means "to weave" in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of bees.
Avelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized) [1]
Rating: 47% based on 10 votes
Diminutive of Avila.
Aviva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲבִיבָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-VEE-vah
Rating: 62% based on 13 votes
Feminine variant of Aviv.
Bellatrix
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Rating: 45% based on 13 votes
Means "female warrior" in Latin. This is the name of the star that marks the left shoulder of the constellation Orion.
Belphoebe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 25% based on 11 votes
Combination of belle "beautiful" and the name Phoebe. This name was first used by Edmund Spenser in his poem The Faerie Queene (1590).
Camellia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-MEEL-i-ə, kə-MEHL-i-ə
Rating: 48% based on 11 votes
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
Candelaria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kan-deh-LA-rya
Rating: 28% based on 9 votes
Means "Candlemas" in Spanish, ultimately derived from Spanish candela "candle". This name is given in honour of the church festival of Candlemas, which commemorates the presentation of Christ in the temple and the purification of the Virgin Mary.
Chrysanthe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Χρυσάνθη(Ancient Greek)
Personal remark: cris-AN-thee
Rating: 44% based on 11 votes
Feminine form of Chrysanthos.
Delphia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DEHL-fee-ə
Rating: 46% based on 9 votes
Possibly from the name of the Greek city of Delphi, the site of an oracle of Apollo, which is possibly related to Greek δελφύς (delphys) meaning "womb". It was used in the play The Prophetess (1647), in which it belongs to the title prophetess.
Desdemona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: dehz-də-MO-nə(English)
Rating: 45% based on 11 votes
Derived from Greek δυσδαίμων (dysdaimon) meaning "ill-fated". This was the name of the murdered wife of Othello in Shakespeare's play Othello (1603).
Desiderata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 19% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Desideratus.
Doriane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Personal remark: do-ree-AHN
Rating: 43% based on 14 votes
French feminine form of Dorian.
Elowen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 61% based on 9 votes
Means "elm tree" in Cornish. This is a recently coined Cornish name.
Elspeth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: EHLS-peth
Rating: 61% based on 16 votes
Scottish form of Elizabeth.
Enobarbus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Personal remark: Rate this as the name Enobaria- which isn't in the database.
Rating: 28% based on 13 votes
Form of Ahenobarbus used by Shakespeare in his play Antony and Cleopatra (1606).
Eseld
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cornish
Rating: 37% based on 10 votes
Cornish form of Isolde.
Esfir
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Эсфирь(Russian)
Pronounced: is-FYEER
Personal remark: EZ-feer
Rating: 34% based on 9 votes
Russian form of Esther.
Esta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EHS-tə
Rating: 37% based on 11 votes
Diminutive of Esther.
Euphemia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, English (Archaic)
Other Scripts: Εὐφημία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-FEE-mee-ə(English)
Personal remark: yoo-FEEM-ee-ah
Rating: 36% based on 11 votes
Means "to use words of good omen" from Greek εὐφημέω (euphemeo), a derivative of εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and φημί (phemi) meaning "to speak, to declare". Saint Euphemia was an early martyr from Chalcedon.
Evadne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Εὐάδνη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 51% based on 18 votes
From Greek Εὐάδνη (Euadne), from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" possibly combined with Cretan Greek ἀδνός (adnos) meaning "holy". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.
Evangeline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: i-VAN-jə-leen
Personal remark: old favorite.
Rating: 61% based on 13 votes
Means "good news" from Greek εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἄγγελμα (angelma) meaning "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his 1847 epic poem Evangeline [1][2]. It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.
Evelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Lithuanian, Greek, Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Εβελίνα(Greek) Эвелина(Russian) Евелина(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: ehv-ə-LEE-nə(English) eh-veh-LEE-na(Italian, Swedish)
Rating: 59% based on 9 votes
Latinate form of Aveline. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel Evelina (1778). It is often regarded as a variant of the related name Evelyn or an elaboration of Eve.
Fleur
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Pronounced: FLUUR(French, Dutch) FLUR(English)
Rating: 49% based on 10 votes
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels The Forsyte Saga (1922).
Freya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, English (Modern), German
Pronounced: FRAY-ə(English) FREH-ya(German)
Rating: 65% based on 11 votes
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This is the name of a goddess associated with love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claims half of the heroes who are slain in battle and brings them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she is one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.

This is not the usual spelling in any of the Scandinavian languages (in Sweden and Denmark it is Freja and in Norway it is Frøja) but it is the common spelling of the goddess's name in English. In the 2000s it became popular in Britain.

Genoveffa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: jeh-no-VEHF-fa
Rating: 33% based on 10 votes
Italian form of Geneviève.
Giada
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: JA-da
Personal remark: JAH-dah
Rating: 33% based on 9 votes
Italian form of Jade.
Godelieve
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Flemish
Pronounced: kho-də-LEE-və(Dutch)
Personal remark: kho-deh-LEE-veh only for this spelling.
Rating: 28% based on 9 votes
Dutch (Flemish) form of Godeliva.
Godeliva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Personal remark: goh-deh-LEE-vah
Rating: 35% based on 13 votes
Feminine form of Goteleib. This was the name of an 11th-century Flemish saint who was murdered on her husband's orders.
Guinevere
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir(English)
Personal remark: GWEN-ev-eer
Rating: 53% based on 12 votes
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar meaning "white phantom", ultimately from the Old Celtic roots *windos meaning "fair, white, blessed" (modern Welsh gwen) and *sebros meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

Gwendoline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English (British), French
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin(English) GWEHN-DAW-LEEN(French)
Rating: 42% based on 10 votes
Variant of Gwendolen.
Gwenhwyfar
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Personal remark: gwen-HWEE-var / GWEN-hwee-var
Rating: 39% based on 10 votes
Welsh form of Guinevere.
Héloïse
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-LO-EEZ
Rating: 55% based on 10 votes
French form of Eloise.
Ishild
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Hypothetical)
Personal remark: as Ishilda
Rating: 35% based on 10 votes
Germanic name, a hypothetical early form of Isolde.
Ismene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἰσμήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EEZ-MEH-NEH(Classical Greek) is-MEE-nee(English)
Personal remark: is-MEEN-ee
Rating: 52% based on 11 votes
Possibly from Greek ἰσμή (isme) meaning "knowledge". This was the name of the daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta in Greek legend.
Isolda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOL-də(English)
Rating: 47% based on 9 votes
Latinate form of Isolde.
Isotta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ee-ZOT-ta
Rating: 52% based on 11 votes
Italian form of Isolde.
Ixchel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mayan Mythology, Indigenous American, Mayan
Pronounced: eesh-CHEHL(Mayan)
Personal remark: ee-SHEL/EE-shel
Rating: 50% based on 8 votes
Means "rainbow lady" in Mayan. Ixchel was the Maya goddess of the earth, the moon, and medicine. She was often depicted with a snake in her hair and crossbones embroidered on her skirt.
Katelijne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Flemish
Pronounced: ka-tə-LAY-nə
Personal remark: kaht-eh-LIE-nah
Rating: 40% based on 11 votes
Dutch form of Katherine, used especially in Flanders.
Keturah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְטוּרָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ki-TOOR-ə(English) ki-TYOOR-ə(English)
Personal remark: <3 <3 <3
Rating: 47% based on 10 votes
Means "incense" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is Abraham's wife after Sarah dies.
Lavinia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 10 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
Leda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Λήδα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: LEH-DA(Classical Greek) LEE-də(English) LAY-də(English)
Rating: 39% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown. In Greek myth she was the mother of Castor, Pollux, Helen and Clytemnestra by the god Zeus, who came upon her in the form of a swan.
Leocadia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: leh-o-KA-dhya(Spanish)
Personal remark: <3
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Late Latin name that might be derived from the name of the Greek island of Leucadia or from Greek λευκός (leukos) meaning "bright, clear, white" (which is also the root of the island's name). Saint Leocadia was a 3rd-century martyr from Spain.
Lilibeth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 53% based on 9 votes
Diminutive of Elizabeth.
Liora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 65% based on 13 votes
Strictly feminine form of Lior.
Lovisa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: loo-VEE-sah
Rating: 48% based on 8 votes
Swedish feminine form of Louis.
Ludmila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Latvian, Russian
Other Scripts: Людмила(Russian)
Pronounced: LOOD-mi-la(Czech) lyuwd-MYEE-lə(Russian)
Personal remark: lood-MEE-lah
Rating: 39% based on 11 votes
Means "favour of the people" from the Slavic elements lyudu "people" and milu "gracious, dear". Saint Ludmila was a 10th-century duchess of Bohemia, the grandmother of Saint Václav. She was murdered on the orders of her daughter-in-law Drahomíra.

As a Russian name, this is an alternate transcription of Людмила (usually rendered Lyudmila).

Lumi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: LOO-mee
Rating: 59% based on 12 votes
Means "snow" in Finnish.
Mahalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Personal remark: mah-HAL-ee-ah
Rating: 35% based on 8 votes
Variant of Mahala.
Megaera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Μέγαιρα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 41% based on 10 votes
Latinized form of Greek Μέγαιρα (Megaira), which was derived from μεγαίρω (megairo) meaning "to grudge". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ἐρινύες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. The name is used as a word in several European languages to denote a shrewish, ill-tempered woman (for example, French mégère and Italian megera).
Mélisande
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 52% based on 12 votes
French form of Millicent used by Maurice Maeterlinck in his play Pelléas et Mélisande (1893). The play was later adapted by Claude Debussy into an opera (1902).
Melusine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mythology
Personal remark: MAY-loo-zeen
Rating: 23% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown. In European folklore Melusine was a water fairy who turned into a serpent from the waist down every Saturday. She made her husband, Raymond of Poitou, promise that he would never see her on that day, and when he broke his word she left him forever.
Naamah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: נַעֲמָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: NAY-ə-mə(English)
Personal remark: NAY-ah-mah/NAH-ah-mah. Also a second favorite.
Rating: 44% based on 12 votes
Means "pleasant" in Hebrew. This name is borne in the Old Testament by both a daughter of Lamech and a wife of Solomon. Some later Jewish texts give Naamah as the name of Noah's wife, even though she is not named in the Old Testament.
Nimue
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: NIM-oo-ay(English)
Personal remark: NIM-oo-ay
Rating: 51% based on 10 votes
Meaning unknown. In Arthurian legends this is the name of a sorceress, also known as the Lady of the Lake, Vivien, or Niniane. Various versions of the tales have Merlin falling in love with her and becoming imprisoned by her magic. She first appears in the medieval French Lancelot-Grail cycle.
Noelani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: no-eh-LA-nee
Personal remark: second favorite? probably.
Rating: 54% based on 14 votes
Means "heavenly mist" from Hawaiian noe "mist" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Peninnah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: פְּנִנָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: pi-NIN-ə(English) pi-NEE-nə(English)
Personal remark: peh-NEE-nah
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
Means "precious stone, pearl" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the wives of Elkanah, the other being Hannah.
Persephone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Personal remark: all-time favorite.
Rating: 68% based on 22 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek πέρθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
Philomène
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FEE-LAW-MEHN
Rating: 49% based on 14 votes
French form of Philomena.
Raziela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare)
Other Scripts: רָזִיאֵלָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 44% based on 12 votes
Feminine form of Raziel.
Rosemary
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree, ROZ-mehr-ee
Rating: 74% based on 12 votes
Combination of Rose and Mary. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
Roshanara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian (Archaic)
Other Scripts: روشنآرا(Persian)
Rating: 38% based on 8 votes
From Persian روشن (roshan) meaning "light" and آرا (ara) meaning "decorate, adorn". This was the name of the second daughter of the 17th-century Mughal emperor Shah Jahan.
Roxelana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 30% based on 8 votes
From a Turkish nickname meaning "Ruthenian". This referred to the region of Ruthenia, covering Belarus, Ukraine and western Russia. Roxelana (1502-1558), also known by the name Hürrem, was a slave and then concubine of Süleyman the Magnificent, sultan of the Ottoman Empire. She eventually became his wife and produced his heir, Selim II.
Sarangerel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mongolian
Other Scripts: Сарангэрэл(Mongolian Cyrillic)
Pronounced: sah-RAHN-geh-rehl
Rating: 39% based on 12 votes
Means "moonlight" in Mongolian.
Scheherazade
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: shə-HEHR-ə-zahd(English)
Personal remark: I adore this the most. sheh-HAIR-ah-zahd.
Rating: 57% based on 15 votes
Anglicized form of Shahrazad.
Sedna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mythology
Rating: 33% based on 8 votes
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Inuit goddess of the sea, sea animals and the underworld. According to some legends Sedna was originally a beautiful woman thrown into the ocean by her father.
Sepphora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Σεπφώρα(Ancient Greek)
Personal remark: :D I love this too, when. prn. as SEFF-or-ah
Rating: 53% based on 11 votes
Greek form of Zipporah.
Séraphine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-RA-FEEN
Rating: 52% based on 11 votes
French form of Seraphina.
Shahar
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שַׁחַר(Hebrew)
Rating: 25% based on 11 votes
Alternate transcription of Hebrew שַׁחַר (see Shachar).
Sieglinde
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: zeek-LIN-də(German)
Personal remark: zee-GLIN-dah
Rating: 31% based on 9 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and lind "soft, tender, flexible". Sieglinde was the mother of Siegfried in the Germanic saga the Nibelungenlied.
Silvana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: seel-VA-na
Rating: 44% based on 10 votes
Italian feminine form of Silvanus.
Siri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: SEE-ree(Swedish)
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
Short form of Sigrid.
Socorro
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: so-KO-ro
Rating: 39% based on 10 votes
Means "succour, help, relief" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary María del Socorro meaning "Mary of Perpetual Succour".
Sophronia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Σωφρονία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 34% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of Sophronius. Torquato Tasso used it in his epic poem Jerusalem Delivered (1580), in which it is borne by the lover of Olindo.
Sunniva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Personal remark: soo-NEEV-ah
Rating: 55% based on 11 votes
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
Thalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
Other Scripts: Θάλεια(Greek)
Pronounced: THAY-lee-ə(English) thə-LIE-ə(English)
Personal remark: (thah-LIE-ah)
Rating: 64% based on 19 votes
From the Greek name Θάλεια (Thaleia), derived from θάλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites).
Theodosia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδοσία(Greek)
Pronounced: TEH-O-DO-SEE-A(Classical Greek) thee-ə-DO-see-ə(English) thee-ə-DO-shə(English)
Personal remark: Love this too
Rating: 41% based on 10 votes
Feminine form of Theodosius.
Tisiphone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Τισιφόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ti-SIF-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 35% based on 11 votes
Means "avenging murder" in Greek, derived from τίσις (tisis) meaning "vengeance" and φονή (phone) meaning "murder". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ἐρινύες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. She killed Cithaeron with the bite of one of the snakes on her head.
Viveka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 30% based on 10 votes
Swedish form of Wiebke.
Willemina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: vi-lə-MEE-nah
Rating: 24% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Willem.
Xanthe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KSAN-TEH(Classical Greek)
Personal remark: KSAHN-thee
Rating: 46% based on 10 votes
Derived from Greek ξανθός (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
Xene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Ξένη(Ancient Greek)
Personal remark: Rate this as Xenokleia (ksehn-oh-KLEE-ah; since it's not in the database and I love it)
Rating: 31% based on 11 votes
Variant of Xenia. This was occasionally adopted as a monastic name during the Byzantine era.
Zhanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Жанна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian)
Pronounced: ZHAN-nə(Russian)
Rating: 33% based on 9 votes
Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian form of Jeanne.
Zosime
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ζωσίμη(Ancient Greek)
Personal remark: zaw-SIH-mee
Rating: 54% based on 14 votes
Feminine form of Zosimos (see Zosimus).
Zuleika
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: zoo-LAY-kə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 11 votes
Meaning uncertain, possibly of Arabic origin. According to medieval tradition, notably related by the 15th-century Persian poet Jami, this was the name of the biblical Potiphar's wife. She has been a frequent subject of poems and tales.
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