Dragon_Clarinet's Personal Name List

Aaliyah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: عالية(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘A-lee-yah(Arabic) ə-LEE-ə(English) ah-LEE-ə(English)
Rating: 24% based on 8 votes
Feminine form of Aali. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the singer Aaliyah Haughton (1979-2001), who was known simply as Aaliyah.
Abena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Akan
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
Means "born on Tuesday" in Akan.
Acantha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἄκανθα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-KAN-thə(English)
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ἄκανθα (Akantha), which meant "thorn, prickle". In Greek legend she was a nymph loved by Apollo.
Aeliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 29% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of Aelianus.
Aeronwy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 30% based on 6 votes
Extended form of Aeron.
Afanen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh (Rare)
Pronounced: a-VAN-ehn
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
Means "raspberry" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
Agata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Polish, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Swedish
Other Scripts: Агата(Russian, Serbian)
Pronounced: a-GA-ta(Italian, Polish) a-GHA-ta(Spanish) u-GA-tə(Russian)
Personal remark: ah-GAH-tah
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Form of Agatha in various languages.
Agatha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀγαθή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AG-ə-thə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 9 votes
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἀγαθή (Agathe), derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
Aglaia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀγλαΐα(Ancient Greek) Αγλαΐα(Greek)
Pronounced: ə-GLIE-ə(English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "splendour, beauty" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the three Graces or Χάριτες (Charites). This name was also borne by a 4th-century saint from Rome.
Áine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: A-nyə
Rating: 43% based on 6 votes
Means "radiance" in Gaelic. This was the name of the queen of the fairies in Celtic mythology. It is also taken as an Irish form of Anne.
Ainhoa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: IE-no-a(Basque) ie-NO-a(Spanish)
Rating: 31% based on 7 votes
From the name of a town in southwest France where there is a famous image of the Virgin Mary.
Alastríona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: al-as-TREE-na
Rating: 40% based on 7 votes
Feminine form of Alastar.
Alazne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: a-LAS-neh
Rating: 36% based on 7 votes
Means "miracle" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Milagros.
Albertina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Pronounced: al-behr-TEE-na(Italian)
Rating: 83% based on 4 votes
Feminine diminutive of Albert.
Alcyone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀλκυόνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: al-SIE-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Latinized form of Greek Ἀλκυόνη (Alkyone), derived from the word ἀλκυών (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
Aldreda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Variant of Etheldred.
Allegra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: al-LEH-gra(Italian) ə-LEHG-rə(English)
Rating: 54% based on 7 votes
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron (1817-1822).
Allovera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Old Germanic form (possibly) of Elvira.
Aloisia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: a-lo-EE-zee-a
Rating: 42% based on 6 votes
German feminine form of Aloysius.
Alphonsine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AL-FAWN-SEEN
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
French feminine diminutive of Alfonso.
Amabel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 53% based on 6 votes
Medieval feminine form of Amabilis.
Amabilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Amabilis.
Amalasuintha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Old Germanic form of Millicent.
Angelien
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: ahn-zhə-LEEN
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Dutch diminutive of Angela.
Angharad
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Personal remark: ang-HAR-ahd
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Means "more love" in Welsh. In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, Angharad Golden-hand is the lover of Peredur.
Aniela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: a-NYEH-la
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Polish form of Angela.
Annabelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: AN-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Variant of Annabel. It can also be taken as a combination of Anna and Belle.
Anthousa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀνθοῦσα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Ancient Greek form of Anfisa.
Antica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 10% based on 6 votes
Croatian diminutive of Antonia.
Antiope
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀντιόπη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Derived from the Greek elements ἀντί (anti) meaning "against, compared to, like" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "voice". This was the name of several figures in Greek mythology, including a daughter of Ares who was one of the queens of the Amazons. She was kidnapped and married by Theseus.
Aoibheann
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EE-vyən
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
From Old Irish Óebfinn, derived from óeb meaning "beauty, appearance, form" and finn meaning "fair, white". This was the name of the mother of Saint Énna of Aran. It was also borne by the daughter of the 10th-century Irish high king Donnchad Donn.
Aoide
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀοιδή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ay-EE-dee(English)
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Means "song" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the original three muses, the muse of song.
Apollinariya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Аполлинария(Russian)
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Russian feminine form of Apollinaris.
Apollonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Italian
Other Scripts: Ἀπολλωνία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Apollonios. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr from Alexandria.
Apolônia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Pronounced: a-po-LO-nyu
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Brazilian Portuguese form of Apollonia.
Arachne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀράχνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-RA-KNEH(Classical Greek) ə-RAK-nee(English)
Rating: 5% based on 4 votes
Means "spider" in Greek. In Greek myth Arachne was a mortal woman who defeated Athena in a weaving contest. After this Arachne hanged herself, but Athena brought her back to life in the form of a spider.
Araminta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Meaning unknown. This name was (first?) used by William Congreve in his comedy The Old Bachelor (1693) and later by Sir John Vanbrugh in his comedy The Confederacy (1705). This was the real name of abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820-1913), who was born Araminta Ross.
Aria 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Rating: 44% based on 9 votes
Means "song, melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century. It is not common in Italy.
Aristomache
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀριστομάχη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 6% based on 5 votes
Derived from the Greek elements ἄριστος (aristos) meaning "best" and μάχη (mache) meaning "battle".
Asenneth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀσεννέθ(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 25% based on 6 votes
Form of Asenath used in the Greek Old Testament.
Ashtoreth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Semitic Mythology
Other Scripts: עַשְׁתֹרֶת(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 22% based on 6 votes
From עַשְׁתֹרֶת ('Ashtoret), the Hebrew form of the name of a Phoenician goddess of love, war and fertility. Her name is cognate to that of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar.
Astrid
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Pronounced: AS-trid(Swedish, English) AH-stree(Norwegian) A-strit(German) AS-TREED(French)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Modern form of Ástríðr. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking.
Atalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲתַלְיָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 45% based on 6 votes
Modern Hebrew transcription of Athaliah.
Athena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English
Other Scripts: Ἀθηνᾶ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TEH-NA(Classical Greek) ə-THEE-nə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 11 votes
Meaning unknown. Athena was the Greek goddess of wisdom and warfare and the patron goddess of the city of Athens in Greece. It is likely that her name is derived from that of the city, not vice versa. The earliest mention of her seems to be a 15th-century BC Mycenaean Greek inscription from Knossos on Crete.

The daughter of Zeus, she was said to have sprung from his head fully grown after he impregnated and swallowed her mother Metis. Athena is associated with the olive tree and the owl.

Athene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀθήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-TEH-NEH(Classical Greek)
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Variant of Athena.
Aurora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RAW-ra(Italian) ow-RO-ra(Spanish, Latin) ə-RAWR-ə(English) OW-ro-rah(Finnish)
Rating: 70% based on 6 votes
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
Avdotya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Авдотья(Russian)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Russian form of Eudocia.
Averill
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was originally derived from the feminine given name Eoforhild.
Aveza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Old Germanic form of Avis.
Avis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-vis
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
Aviva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֲבִיבָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ah-VEE-vah
Rating: 80% based on 1 vote
Feminine variant of Aviv.
Avril
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare), English (Rare)
Pronounced: A-VREEL(French) AV-ril(English)
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
French form of April.
Axelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-KSEHL
Personal remark: ah-KSEL
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Axel.
Azucena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-thoo-THEH-na(European Spanish) a-soo-SEH-na(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "madonna lily" in Spanish.
Bathsheba
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: בַּת־שֶׁבַע(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: bath-SHEE-bə(English)
Rating: 23% based on 4 votes
Means "daughter of the oath" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a woman married to Uriah the Hittite. King David seduced her and made her pregnant, so he arranged to have her husband killed in battle and then married her. She was the mother of Solomon.
Batsheva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: בַּת־שֶׁבַע(Hebrew)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Hebrew variant of Bathsheba.
Beata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, German, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: beh-A-ta(Polish, German)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
Beatriz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: beh-a-TREETH(European Spanish) beh-a-TREES(Latin American Spanish, Portuguese) beh-a-TREESH(Portuguese)
Personal remark: BEE-uh-triz or BEE-uh-treez
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Beatrix.
Belén
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: beh-LEHN
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is from Hebrew בֵּית־לֶחֶם (Beit-lechem) meaning "house of bread".
Belinha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Portuguese diminutive of Isabel.
Berengaria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Personal remark: bair-en-GAR-ee-ah
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Latinized feminine form of Berengar. This name was borne by a 13th-century queen of Castile.
Bethan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: BETH-an
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Welsh diminutive of Elizabeth.
Blanka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Croatian, Slovene
Pronounced: BLANG-ka(Czech, Slovak, Croatian) BLAN-ka(Polish) BLAWNG-kaw(Hungarian)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Form of Blanche in several languages.
Blodeuyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "flower" in Welsh.
Bluma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: בלומאַ(Yiddish)
Pronounced: BLOO-mah
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From Yiddish בלום (blum) meaning "flower".
Boadicea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Pronounced: bo-di-SEE-ə(English)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Medieval variant of Boudicca, possibly arising from a scribal error.
Bohuslava
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Богуслава(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: BO-hoo-sla-va(Czech) bo-hoo-SLAH-vah(Ukrainian)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Bohuslav.
Branwen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: BRAN-wehn(Welsh)
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh brân "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
Briallen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: bri-A-shehn
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.
Calfuray
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche
Pronounced: kəl-fi-RIE(Mapudungun) kal-foo-RIE(Spanish)
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Means "violet (flower)" in Mapuche.
Callisto 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλλιστώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIS-to(English)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of Kallisto. A moon of Jupiter bears this name.
Calogera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ka-LAW-jeh-ra
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Calogero.
Candida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, English
Pronounced: KAN-di-də(English)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Late Latin name derived from candidus meaning "white". This was the name of several early saints, including a woman supposedly healed by Saint Peter. As an English name, it came into use after George Bernard Shaw's play Candida (1898).
Cassiopeia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κασσιόπεια, Κασσιέπεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kas-ee-ə-PEE-ə(English)
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιόπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιέπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
Célestine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-LEHS-TEEN
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of Caelestinus.
Celestine
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHL-ə-steen
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
English form of Caelestinus. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
Citlali
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Personal remark: cheet-LAHL-ee/seet-LAHL-ee
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "star" in Nahuatl.
Clíodhna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KLEE-u-na(Irish)
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Possibly means "shapely" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish legend this was the name of a beautiful goddess. She fell in love with a mortal named Ciabhan and left the Land of Promise with him, but when she arrived on the other shore she was swept to sea by a great wave.
Clover
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLO-vər
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
Coralie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Either a French form of Koralia, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see Coral).
Cordelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə(English) kawr-DEEL-yə(English)
Personal remark: Put this here since I like the French Cordelie (cor-day-LEE) - rate as Cordelie
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
From Cordeilla, a name appearing in the 12th-century chronicles [1] of Geoffrey of Monmouth, borne by the youngest of the three daughters of King Leir and the only one to remain loyal to her father. Geoffrey possibly based her name on that of Creiddylad, a daughter of Lludd Llaw Eraint in the early Arthurian tale Culhwch and Olwen. This Welsh name is of uncertain meaning.

The spelling was later altered to Cordelia when Geoffrey's story was adapted by others, including Edmund Spenser in his poem The Faerie Queene (1590) and Shakespeare in his tragedy King Lear (1606).

Cosette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Literature
Pronounced: KAW-ZEHT(French)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables (1862). Her real name is Euphrasie, though it is seldom used. In the novel young Cosette is the ward of the cruel Thénardiers until she is retrieved by Jean Valjean.
Cosima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: KAW-zee-ma
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
Italian feminine form of Cosimo.
Csilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: CHEEL-law
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Derived from Hungarian csillag meaning "star". This name was created by the Hungarian author András Dugonics for an 1803 novel and later used and popularized by the poet Mihály Vörösmarty.
Cyneburga
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
Variant of Cyneburg.
Cyriaca
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Cyriacus.
Cyrilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Personal remark: ser-ILL-ah
Rating: 22% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Cyril.
Dagny
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: DAHNG-nuy(Swedish)
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
From the Old Norse name Dagný, which was derived from the elements dagr "day" and nýr "new".
Dahlia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
Danica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Slovak, Macedonian, English
Other Scripts: Даница(Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DA-nee-tsa(Serbian, Croatian) DA-nyee-tsa(Slovak) DAN-i-kə(English)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From a Slavic word meaning "morning star, Venus". This name occurs in Slavic folklore as a personification of the morning star. It has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world since the 1970s.
Delilah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: di-LIE-lə(English)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.
Delphina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of the Latin name Delphinus, which meant "of Delphi". Delphi was a city in ancient Greece, the name of which is possibly related to Greek δελφύς (delphys) meaning "womb". The Blessed Delphina was a 14th-century Provençal nun.
Delyth
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From an elaboration of Welsh del "pretty".
Desideria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: deh-see-DHEH-rya(Spanish)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Desiderio. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.
Despoina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Δέσποινα(Greek)
Pronounced: DHEH-spee-na(Greek)
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Means "mistress, lady" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of the daughter of Demeter and Poseidon. She was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at Eleusis near Athens.
Devika
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: देविका(Hindi)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "little goddess" from Sanskrit देवी (devi) meaning "goddess" and (ka) meaning "little".
Dionysia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Dionysius.
Dolores
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: do-LO-rehs(Spanish) də-LAWR-is(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "sorrows", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary María de los Dolores, meaning "Mary of Sorrows". It has been used in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in America during the 1920s and 30s.
Dominga
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: do-MEENG-ga
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Spanish feminine form of Dominic.
Dulcibella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From Latin dulcis "sweet" and bella "beautiful". The usual medieval spelling of this name was Dowsabel, and the Latinized form Dulcibella was revived in the 18th century.
Dulcinea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Derived from Spanish dulce meaning "sweet". This name was (first?) used by Miguel de Cervantes in his novel Don Quixote (1605), where it belongs to the love interest of the main character, though she never actually appears in the story.
Efigénia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Portuguese form of Iphigeneia.
Efigênia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Brazilian Portuguese form of Iphigeneia.
Eilionoir
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Scottish form of Eleanor.
Eleftheria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ελευθερία(Greek)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Eleftherios.
Elettra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: eh-LEHT-tra
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Italian form of Electra.
Elixabete
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: eh-LEE-sha-beh-teh
Rating: 37% based on 6 votes
Basque form of Elizabeth.
Elvire
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EHL-VEER
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
French form of Elvira.
Enid
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: EH-nid(Welsh)
Rating: 70% based on 5 votes
Derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul" or "life". She is the wife of Geraint in Welsh legend and Arthurian romance.
Ephrath
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶפְרָת(Ancient Hebrew) Ἐφράθ(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
Means "fruitful place" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this name was borne by one of the wives of Caleb. Also in the Bible, it is the name of the place where Rachel was buried.
Erminlinda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Old Germanic form of Ermelinda.
Esmée
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: EHZ-may(English) EHZ-mee(English) ehs-MEH(Dutch)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Esmé.
Esther
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: אֶסְתֵר(Hebrew) Ἐσθήρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHS-tər(English, Dutch) EHS-TEHR(French) ehs-TEHR(Spanish)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess Ishtar. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.

This name has been used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. In America it received a boost in popularity after the birth of Esther Cleveland (1893-1980), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland [1].

Euphrasie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: UU-FRA-ZEE
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
French form of Euphrasia.
Euterpe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὐτέρπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EW-TEHR-PEH(Classical Greek) yoo-TUR-pee(English)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "delight" in Greek, ultimately from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and τέρπω (terpo) meaning "to satisfy, to cheer". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, the muse of music and joy. She was said to have invented the double flute.
Evangelija
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Евангелија(Macedonian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Macedonian feminine form of Evangelos.
Evangeliya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Евангелия(Bulgarian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Bulgarian feminine form of Evangelos.
Everild
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History (Ecclesiastical)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of Eoforhild. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
Fabienne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: FA-BYEHN
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
French feminine form of Fabianus (see Fabian).
Fakhriyya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: فخريّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: fakh-REE-yah
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Fakhri.
Faustine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
French feminine form of Faustinus (see Faustino).
Feliciana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: feh-lee-THYA-na(European Spanish) feh-lee-SYA-na(Latin American Spanish) feh-lee-CHA-na(Italian)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Felicianus (see Feliciano).
Fenella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 50% based on 8 votes
Anglicized form of Fionnuala.
Fernanda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: fehr-NAN-da(Spanish)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian feminine form of Ferdinand.
Fflur
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: FLEER
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Welsh form of Flora.
Fiammetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Derived from Italian fiamma meaning "flame" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Fioralba
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Combination of Italian fiore "flower" and alba "dawn".
Florence
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: FLAWR-əns(English) FLAW-RAHNS(French)
Rating: 90% based on 5 votes
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.

The name can also be given in reference to the city in Italy, as in the case of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910). She was a nurse in British hospitals during the Crimean War and is usually considered the founder of modern nursing.

Francisca
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Pronounced: fran-THEES-ka(European Spanish) fran-SEES-ka(Latin American Spanish) frun-SEESH-ku(Portuguese) frun-SEES-ku(Portuguese)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Franciscus (see Francis).
Freyde
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: פֿריידע(Yiddish)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From Yiddish פֿרייד (freid) meaning "joy".
Gaétane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: GA-EH-TAN
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
French feminine form of Caietanus (see Gaetano).
Gardenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: gahr-DEEN-ee-ə
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
From the name of the tropical flower, which was named for the Scottish naturalist Alexander Garden (1730-1791).
Genevieve
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHN-ə-veev
Rating: 58% based on 6 votes
English form of Geneviève.
Gennadiya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Геннадия(Russian)
Pronounced: gyin-NA-dyi-yə
Personal remark: gee-NAH-dee-ah / gye-NAH-dee-ah; this is cute
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Gennadiy.
Georgiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Romanian
Pronounced: jawr-jee-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of George. This form of the name has been in use in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.
Gormlaith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Personal remark: GOR-um-luh
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Derived from Irish gorm "blue" or "illustrious" and flaith "princess, lady". This was the name of a wife of the 11th-century Irish ruler Brian Boru.
Gráinne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: GRAW-nyə(Irish)
Rating: 34% based on 5 votes
Possibly derived from Gaelic grán meaning "grain". This was the name of an ancient Irish grain goddess. The name also belonged to the fiancée of Fionn mac Cumhail and the lover of Diarmaid in later Irish legend, and it is often associated with gráidh meaning "love".
Grímhildr
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Rating: 12% based on 6 votes
Old Norse cognate of Kriemhild. In the Norse Völsungasaga Grímhildr is the mother of Gunnar and Gudrun, while in the Germanic counterpart the Nibelungenlied Kriemhild is the sister of Günther and she herself has a role equivalent to Gudrun.
Grimhilt
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1], Germanic Mythology
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
Older Germanic form of Kriemhild.
Griselda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Literature
Pronounced: gri-ZEHL-də(English) gree-SEHL-da(Spanish)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
Gunilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: gu-NIL-lah
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
Swedish variant of Gunhild.
Gwawr
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Personal remark: GWOWR. Like the word 'wow', with a 'G' and an 'R' in front of it.
Rating: 46% based on 5 votes
Means "dawn" in Welsh.
Gwendolen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin(English)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.
Hadriana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Hadrianus.
Halldóra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Icelandic feminine form of Haldor.
Hannele
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: HAHN-neh-leh
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Finnish diminutive of Johanna or Hannah.
Hathor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ἅθωρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HATH-awr(English)
Rating: 13% based on 7 votes
Greek form of Egyptian ḥwt-ḥrw (reconstructed as Hut-Heru) meaning "the house of Horus", derived from Egyptian ḥwt "house" combined with the god Horus. In Egyptian mythology she was the goddess of love, often depicted with the head of a cow.
Hatshepsut
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: hat-SHEHP-soot(English)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From Egyptian ḥꜣt-špswt meaning "foremost of noble women". This was the name of a pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. She may have been the first woman to take the title of Pharaoh.
Hefina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Hefin.
Henna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: HEHN-nah
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Finnish feminine form of Heinrich (see Henry).
Hephzibah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: חֶפְצִי־בָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: HEHF-zi-bə(English) HEHP-zi-bə(English)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "my delight is in her" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the wife of King Hezekiah of Judah and the mother of Manasseh.
Hersilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Greek ἕρση (herse) meaning "dew". In Roman legend this was the name of a Sabine woman who became the wife of Romulus.
Hikari
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) ひかり(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: KHEE-KA-REE
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written with the hiragana writing system.
Hildegard
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: HIL-də-gart(German)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
Hildegarde
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: EEL-DU-GARD
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
French form of Hildegard.
Honora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Variant of Honoria. It was brought to England and Ireland by the Normans.
Honoria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Honorius.
Honorine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AW-NAW-REEN
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
French form of Honorina, a feminine form of the Roman name Honorinus, a derivative of Honorius. Saint Honorina was a 4th-century martyr from the Normandy region in France.
Hosanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Pronounced: ho-ZAN-ə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
From the Aramaic religious expression הושע נא (Hosha' na') meaning "deliver us" in Hebrew. In the New Testament this is exclaimed by those around Jesus when he first enters Jerusalem.
Hyacinth 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: HIE-ə-sinth
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the name of the flower (or the precious stone that also bears this name), ultimately from Greek hyakinthos (see Hyacinthus).
Hypatia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ὑπατία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Derived from Greek ὕπατος (hypatos) meaning "highest, supreme". Hypatia of Alexandria was a 5th-century philosopher and mathematician, daughter of the mathematician Theon.
Idonea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Archaic)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
Medieval English name, probably a Latinized form of Iðunn. The spelling may have been influenced by Latin idonea "suitable". It was common in England from the 12th century [1].
Ieva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Latvian
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Lithuanian and Latvian form of Eve. This is also the Lithuanian and Latvian word for a type of cherry tree (species Prunus padus).
Imelda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: ee-MEHL-da
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Irmhild. The Blessed Imelda was a young 14th-century nun from Bologna.
Inanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sumerian Mythology
Other Scripts: 𒀭𒈹(Sumerian Cuneiform)
Pronounced: i-NAH-nə(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Possibly derived from Sumerian nin-an-a(k) meaning "lady of the heavens", from 𒊩𒌆 (nin) meaning "lady" and the genitive form of 𒀭 (an) meaning "heaven, sky". Inanna was the Sumerian goddess of love, fertility and war. She descended into the underworld where the ruler of that place, her sister Ereshkigal, had her killed. The god Enki interceded, and Inanna was allowed to leave the underworld as long as her husband Dumuzi took her place.

Inanna was later conflated with the Semitic (Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian) deity Ishtar.

Inkeri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: EENG-keh-ree
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
Finnish form of Ingrid or Inger.
Iolanthe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: ie-o-LAN-thee(English)
Personal remark: eye-oh-LAHN-thee
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Probably a variant of Yolanda influenced by the Greek words ἰόλη (iole) meaning "violet" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". This name was (first?) used by Gilbert and Sullivan in their comic opera Iolanthe (1882).
Isabelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: EE-ZA-BEHL(French) IZ-ə-behl(English) ee-za-BEH-lə(German) ee-sah-BEHL-lə(Dutch)
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
French form of Isabel.
Iscah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יִסְכָּה(Ancient Hebrew)
Personal remark: EE-skah
Rating: 60% based on 6 votes
From the Hebrew name יִסְכָּה (Yiskah) meaning "to behold". In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's niece, mentioned only briefly. This is the basis of the English name Jessica.
Iseabail
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Scottish form of Isabel.
Iseult
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOOLT(English) i-ZOOLT(English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Medieval variant of Isolde.
Isis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ἶσις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-sis(English)
Rating: 56% based on 11 votes
Greek form of Egyptian ꜣst (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), possibly from st meaning "throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.
Isla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: IE-lə
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Variant of Islay, typically used as a feminine name. It also coincides with the Spanish word isla meaning "island".
Isolde
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: i-SOL-də(English) i-ZOL-də(English) i-SOLD(English) i-ZOLD(English) ee-ZAWL-də(German)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".

In medieval Arthurian legend Isolde was an Irish princess betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. After accidentally drinking a love potion, she became the lover of his knight Tristan, which led to their tragic deaths. The story was popular during the Middle Ages and the name became relatively common in England at that time. It was rare by the 19th century, though some interest was generated by Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (1865).

Iðunn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian [1], Icelandic
Pronounced: I-dhuyn(Icelandic)
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Probably derived from Old Norse "again" and unna "to love". In Norse mythology Iðunn was the goddess of spring and immortality whose responsibility it was to guard the gods' apples of youth.
Ivana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Ивана(Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: I-va-na(Czech) EE-va-na(Slovak)
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Ivan.
Ivonette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Rare)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Ivone.
Izolda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian, Russian, Hungarian, Polish (Rare)
Other Scripts: იზოლდა(Georgian) Изольда(Russian)
Pronounced: ee-ZAWL-da(Polish)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Georgian, Russian, Hungarian and Polish form of Isolde.
Izumi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) いずみ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: EE-ZOO-MEE
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (izumi) meaning "fountain, spring". This name can also be constructed from other combinations of kanji.
Jacintha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: yah-SIN-tah
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of Jacinthe.
Jacobine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian (Archaic), Dutch (Rare)
Pronounced: yah-ko-BEE-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Norwegian and Dutch feminine form of Jacob.
Jezebel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אִיזֶבֶל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JEHZ-ə-behl(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew אִיזֶבֶל ('Izevel), which probably means "where is the prince?", a ritual question spoken in ceremonies honouring Baal. Alternatively, it may mean "not exalted". In the Old Testament Jezebel is the evil wife of Ahab, king of Israel. After she was thrown from a window to her death her body was eaten by dogs, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy.
Jocasta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: Ἰοκάστη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: jo-KAS-tə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Ἰοκάστη (Iokaste), which is of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology she was the mother Oedipus by the Theban king Laius. In a case of tragic mistaken identity, she married her own son.
Johanneke
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: yo-HAHN-nə-kə
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Dutch diminutive of Johanna.
Junia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Junius. This was the name of an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament (there is some debate about whether the name belongs to a man or a woman).
Juniper
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JOON-i-pər
Rating: 93% based on 4 votes
From the English word for the type of tree, derived ultimately from Latin iuniperus.
Kalyani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Bengali, Marathi, Hindi
Other Scripts: कल्याणी(Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi) కల్యాణి(Telugu) கல்யாணி(Tamil) കല്യാണി(Malayalam) ಕಲ್ಯಾಣಿ(Kannada) কল্যাণী(Bengali)
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Means "beautiful, lovely, auspicious" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the Mahabharata this is the name of one of the Krittikas, or Pleiades. It is also another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
Kata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian, Finnish, Croatian
Pronounced: KAW-taw(Hungarian) KAH-tah(Finnish)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Hungarian short form of Katalin, Finnish short form of Katariina and Croatian short form of Katarina.
Katell
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Breton
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Breton form of Katherine.
Katica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian
Pronounced: KAW-tee-tsaw(Hungarian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Croatian, Slovene and Hungarian diminutive of Katherine.
Katida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: ka-TEE-da
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
From Esperanto katido meaning "kitten", ultimately from Latin cattus.
Katja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian
Pronounced: KAT-ya(German) KAHT-yah(Dutch)
Rating: 42% based on 5 votes
Form of Katya in various languages.
Keziah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: קְצִיעָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: kə-ZIE-ə(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
Kinborough
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Rating: 12% based on 6 votes
Middle English form of Cyneburg.
Klavdiya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Клавдия(Russian, Bulgarian) Клавдія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: KLAV-dyi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Russian, Ukrainian and Bulgarian feminine form of Claudius.
Klytië
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Κλυτίη, Κλυτία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Derived from Greek κλυτός (klytos) meaning "famous, noble". In Greek myth Klytië was an ocean nymph who loved the sun god Helios. Her love was not returned, and she pined away staring at him until she was transformed into a heliotrope flower, whose head moves to follow the sun.
Krešimira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian (Rare)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Krešimir.
Kreszentia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: krehs-TSEHN-tsya
Personal remark: For now I pronounce as kres-ZENT-ee-ah
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
German form of Crescentia.
Ksenija
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene, Latvian
Other Scripts: Ксенија(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Form of Xenia in several languages.
Laurel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: LAWR-əl
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
Leandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: leh-AN-dra(Spanish)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Leander.
Leilani
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: lay-LA-nee
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Means "heavenly flowers" or "royal child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Leokadia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: leh-aw-KA-dya
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Polish form of Leocadia.
Leonora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 78% based on 4 votes
Italian short form of Eleanor.
Leonore
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: leh-o-NO-rə
Rating: 68% based on 4 votes
German short form of Eleanor.
Lesedi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Tswana
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Means "light" in Tswana.
Leta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from Latin laetus meaning "glad". Otherwise, it could be a short form of names ending in leta.
Líadan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LEE-din
Rating: 58% based on 5 votes
Means "grey lady" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish legend she was a poetess who became a nun, but then missed her lover Cuirithir so much that she died of grief.
Ligeia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Λιγεία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek λιγύς (ligys) meaning "clear-voiced, shrill, whistling". This was the name of one of the Sirens in Greek legend. It was also used by Edgar Allan Poe in his story Ligeia (1838).
Lileas
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Scottish form of Lillian.
Lilith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Pronounced: LIL-ith(English)
Rating: 60% based on 5 votes
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
Liviana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: lee-VYA-na(Italian)
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name Livius.
Livnat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִבְנַת(Hebrew)
Personal remark: LEEV-naht
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Variant of Livna.
Lourdes
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: LOOR-dhehs(Spanish) LOR-dhehs(Spanish) LOORD(French) LOORDZ(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the name of a French town. It became a popular center of pilgrimage after a young girl from the town had visions of the Virgin Mary in a nearby grotto.
Lucasta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
This name was first used by the poet Richard Lovelace for a collection of poems called Lucasta (1649). The poems were dedicated to Lucasta, a nickname for the woman he loved Lucy Sacheverel, who he called lux casta "pure light".
Lucretia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: loo-KREE-shə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of the Roman family name Lucretius, possibly from Latin lucrum meaning "profit, wealth". In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown. This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain.
Luljeta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Rating: 40% based on 5 votes
Means "flower of life" in Albanian, from lule "flower" and jetë "life".
Lysistrata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Λυσιστράτη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of Lysistrate.
Madelief
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Derived from Dutch madeliefje meaning "daisy".
Maëlle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Breton
Pronounced: MA-EHL(French)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Maël.
Maëlys
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MA-EH-LEES
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Maël, possibly influenced by the spelling of Mailys.
Maeva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tahitian, French
Pronounced: MA-EH-VA(French)
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Means "welcome" in Tahitian. It gained popularity in France during the 1980s.
Maeve
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: MAYV(Irish)
Rating: 62% based on 6 votes
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
Magnolia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: mag-NO-lee-ə
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From the English word magnolia for the flower, which was named for the French botanist Pierre Magnol.
Mahalath
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: מָחֲלַת(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name מָחֲלַת (Machalat) meaning "lyre". In the Old Testament she is the daughter of Ishmael and the wife of Esau.
Małgorzata
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: mow-gaw-ZHA-ta
Personal remark: maw-gawh-ZHAH-tah
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Polish form of Margaret.
Malin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Pronounced: MAH-lin
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
Swedish and Norwegian short form of Magdalene.
Mareike
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Frisian, German
Pronounced: ma-RIE-kə(German)
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Frisian and German diminutive of Maria.
Marguerite
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-GU-REET
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
French form of Margaret. This is also the French word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
Mariamne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
From Μαριάμη (Mariame), the form of Maria used by the historian Josephus when referring to the wife of King Herod.
Marjolaine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MAR-ZHAW-LEHN
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "marjoram" in French. Marjoram is a minty herb.
Marsaili
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: MAR-si-li
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Scottish form of both Marjorie and Marcella.
Megumi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 恵, 愛, etc.(Japanese Kanji) めぐみ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: MEH-GOO-MEE
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (megumi) meaning "favour, benefit" or (megumi) meaning "love, affection", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that have the same reading. It is often written using the hiragana writing system.
Melisende
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval French
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
Old French form of Millicent.
Melpomene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Μελπομένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: MEHL-PO-MEH-NEH(Classical Greek) mehl-PAHM-ə-nee(English)
Rating: 32% based on 5 votes
Derived from Greek μέλπω (melpo) meaning "to sing, to celebrate with song". This was the name of one of the nine Muses in Greek mythology, the muse of tragedy.
Mererid
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Welsh form of Margaret.
Metrodora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Μητροδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 28% based on 4 votes
Derived from Greek μήτηρ (meter) meaning "mother" (genitive μητρός) and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr who was killed with her sisters Menodora and Nymphodora.
Midori
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) みどり(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: MEE-DO-REE
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (midori) meaning "green", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that have the same pronunciation.
Milagros
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: mee-LA-ghros
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "miracles" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de los Milagros, which means "Our Lady of Miracles".
Mireia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan, Spanish
Pronounced: mee-REH-yə(Catalan) mee-REH-ya(Spanish)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Catalan form of Mirèio (see Mireille).
Montserrat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: moon-sə-RAT
Rating: 20% based on 5 votes
From the name of a mountain near Barcelona, the site of a monastery founded in the 10th century. The mountain gets its name from Latin mons serratus meaning "jagged mountain".
Myfanwy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "my woman" from the Welsh prefix my "my" combined with banw "woman".
Mylène
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: MEE-LEHN
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
Combination of Marie and Hélène. It can also be used as a French form of Milena.
Nanaia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: 𒀭𒈾𒈾𒀀(Akkadian Cuneiform)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Greek form of Nanaya.
Nanami
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 七海, 菜々美(Japanese Kanji) ななみ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: NA-NA-MEE
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (nana) meaning "seven" and (mi) meaning "sea". It can also come from (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" duplicated and (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
Nanaya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sumerian Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Other Scripts: 𒀭𒈾𒈾𒀀(Sumerian Cuneiform, Akkadian Cuneiform)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Meaning unknown, possibly related to Inanna. This was the name of a goddess worshipped by the Sumerians and Akkadians. She was later conflated with the goddesses Anahita and Aphrodite.
Natsumi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 夏美, 菜摘, etc.(Japanese Kanji) なつみ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: NA-TSOO-MEE
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (natsu) meaning "summer" and (mi) meaning "beautiful". It can also come from (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsumi) meaning "pick, pluck". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Nausicaa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ναυσικάα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Latinized form of Greek Ναυσικάα (Nausikaa) meaning "burner of ships". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of a daughter of Alcinous who helps Odysseus on his journey home.
Nayeli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Zapotec, Spanish (Mexican)
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Possibly from Zapotec nadxiie lii meaning "I love you" or nayele' meaning "open".
Nedelya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Неделя(Bulgarian)
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Means "Sunday" in Bulgarian.
Nefertari
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: nehf-ər-TAHR-ee(English)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
From Egyptian nfrt-jrj meaning "the most beautiful". This was the name of an Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the favourite wife of Rameses II.
Nelinha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Portuguese diminutive of Manuela.
Nephele
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νεφέλη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NEH-PEH-LEH(Classical Greek) NEHF-ə-lee(English)
Personal remark: NEFF-eh-lee / neh-FELL-ee
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From Greek νέφος (nephos) meaning "cloud". In Greek legend Nephele was created from a cloud by Zeus, who shaped the cloud to look like Hera in order to trick Ixion, a mortal who desired her. Nephele was the mother of the centaurs by Ixion, and was also the mother of Phrixus and Helle by Athamus.
Nieves
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: NYEH-behs
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Means "snows" in Spanish, derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".
Nizhoni
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Navajo
Rating: 28% based on 6 votes
Means "beautiful" from Navajo nizhóní.
Noémie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: NAW-EH-MEE
Rating: 68% based on 5 votes
French form of Naomi 1.
Noemin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Νωεμίν(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Form of Naomi 1 used in the Greek Old Testament.
Noriko
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 典子, 紀子, 法子, etc.(Japanese Kanji) のりこ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: NO-REE-KO
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (nori) meaning "rule, ceremony" or (nori) meaning "chronicle" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Odessa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 43% based on 4 votes
From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of Odysseus.
Odilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1][2]
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Derived from the Germanic element odal meaning "fatherland" or aud meaning "wealth, fortune". Saint Odilia (or Odila) was an 8th-century nun who is considered the patron saint of Alsace. She was apparently born blind but gained sight when she was baptized.
Oksana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ukrainian, Russian
Other Scripts: Оксана(Ukrainian, Russian)
Pronounced: uk-SA-nə(Russian)
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Ukrainian form of Xenia.
Olalla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: o-LA-ya
Rating: 54% based on 5 votes
Spanish variant of Eulalia. This was the name of two 4th-century saints from Spain.
Olivera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Оливера(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Oliver.
Orabela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: o-ra-BEH-la
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Means "golden-beautiful" in Esperanto, ultimately from Latin aurea "gold" and bella "beautiful".
Ottavia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ot-TA-vya
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Italian form of Octavia.
Ottilie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: aw-TEE-lyə
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
German form of Odilia.
Otylia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Pronounced: aw-TI-lya
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Polish form of Odilia.
Pandora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA(Classical Greek) pan-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek πᾶν (pan) meaning "all" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.
Parthenope
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Παρθενόπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pahr-THEHN-ə-pee(English)
Rating: 33% based on 4 votes
Means "maiden's voice", derived from Greek παρθένος (parthenos) meaning "maiden, virgin" and ὄψ (ops) meaning "voice". In Greek legend this is the name of one of the Sirens who enticed Odysseus.
Pernilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Pronounced: peh-NIL-la
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Swedish short form of Petronilla.
Petra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Other Scripts: Петра(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: PEH-tra(German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak) PEH-traw(Hungarian) PEHT-rah(Finnish) PEHT-rə(English)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Peter. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
Petronela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Slovak
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Romanian and Slovak form of Petronilla.
Petronella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Hungarian
Pronounced: PEH-tro-nehl-law(Hungarian)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Dutch, Swedish and Hungarian form of Petronilla.
Petronilla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Late Roman
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
From a Latin name, a diminutive of Petronia, the feminine form of Petronius. This was the name of an obscure 1st-century Roman saint, later believed to be a daughter of Saint Peter.
Pétronille
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: PEH-TRO-NEE
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
French form of Petronilla.
Pherenike
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Φερενίκη(Ancient Greek)
Personal remark: FAIR-ah-NEE-kee / fer-EN-ek-ee
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Ancient Attic Greek form of Berenice.
Philomel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: FIL-ə-mehl(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from Philomela). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
Philomela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Φιλομήλη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: fil-ə-MEE-lə(English)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From Greek Φιλομήλη (Philomele), derived from φίλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend" and μῆλον (melon) meaning "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μέλος (melos) meaning "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.
Philomena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Late Greek
Other Scripts: Φιλομένα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: fil-ə-MEEN-ə(English)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
From Greek φίλος (philos) meaning "friend, lover" and μένος (menos) meaning "mind, strength, force". This was the name of an obscure early saint and martyr. The name came to public attention in 1802 after a tomb seemingly marked with the name Filumena was found in Rome, supposedly belonging to another martyr named Philomena. This may have in fact been a representation of the Greek word φιλομήνη (philomene) meaning "loved".
Polyhymnia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Πολυύμνια(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of Polymnia.
Polyxena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Πολυξένη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: pə-LIK-sin-ə(English)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of Greek Πολυξένη (Polyxene), which was from the word πολύξενος (polyxenos) meaning "entertaining many guests, very hospitable", itself derived from πολύς (polys) meaning "many" and ξένος (xenos) meaning "foreigner, guest". In Greek legend she was a daughter of Priam and Hecuba, beloved by Achilles. After the Trojan War, Achilles' son Neoptolemus sacrificed her.
Pranvera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Pronounced: prahn-VEHR-ah
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Derived from Albanian pranverë meaning "spring", itself from pranë "nearby, close" and verë "summer".
Primula
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-yuw-lə
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From the name of a genus of several species of flowers, including the primrose. It is derived from the Latin word primulus meaning "very first".
Proserpina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: pro-SUR-pin-ə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "to emerge" in Latin. She was the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Persephone.
Psyche
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ψυχή(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PSUY-KEH(Classical Greek) SIE-kee(English)
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Means "the soul", derived from Greek ψύχω (psycho) meaning "to breathe". The Greeks thought that the breath was the soul. In Greek mythology Psyche was a beautiful maiden who was beloved by Eros (or Cupid in Roman mythology). She is the subject of Keats's poem Ode to Psyche (1819).
Ravenna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: rə-VEHN-ə
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Either an elaboration of Raven, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.
Rhiannon
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: ree-AN-awn(Welsh) ree-AN-ən(English)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.

As an English name, it became popular due to the Fleetwood Mac song Rhiannon (1976).

Rohesia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English (Latinized)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of the medieval name Rohese (see Rose).
Romilda
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Italian, Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
Romy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RO-mee(German, English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Rosemarie or Rosemary.
Rosalba
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Italian name meaning "white rose", derived from Latin rosa "rose" and alba "white". A famous bearer was the Venetian painter Rosalba Carriera (1675-1757).
Rosalie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Dutch, English
Pronounced: RAW-ZA-LEE(French) ro-za-LEE(German) RO-zə-lee(English)
Rating: 84% based on 5 votes
French, German and Dutch form of Rosalia. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie Rosalie (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.
Rosamund
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: RO-zə-mənd, RAHZ-ə-mənd
Rating: 90% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hros "horse" and mund "protection". The Normans introduced this name to England. It was subsequently influenced by the Latin phrase rosa munda "pure rose". This was the name of the mistress of Henry II, the king of England in the 12th century. She was possibly murdered by his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.
Rosemarie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree(English) ROZ-mehr-ee(English) RO-zə-ma-ree(German)
Rating: 90% based on 4 votes
Variant of Rosemary.
Roswitha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: raws-VEE-ta
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and swinth "strength". This was the name of a 10th-century nun from Saxony who wrote several notable poems and dramas.
Ruby
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ROO-bee
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 16th century [1].
Ruya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رؤية(Arabic)
Pronounced: ROO-yah
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Means "vision, sight" in Arabic.
Růžena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: ROO-zheh-na
Personal remark: roo-ZHEN-ah; means rose in Czech
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Derived from Czech růže meaning "rose".
Sabina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Сабина(Russian)
Pronounced: sa-BEE-na(Italian, Spanish) sa-BYEE-na(Polish) SA-bi-na(Czech)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "a Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
Saffron
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SAF-rən
Rating: 55% based on 4 votes
From the English word that refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".
Saija
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SIE-yah
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Diminutive of Sari 1.
Sakura
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 桜, 咲良, etc.(Japanese Kanji) さくら(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SA-KOO-RA
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From Japanese (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom", though it is often written using the hiragana writing system. It can also come from (saku) meaning "blossom" and (ra) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable" as well as other kanji combinations.
Sandrine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAHN-DREEN
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
French diminutive of Sandra.
Sanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Finnish
Pronounced: SAHN-nah(Finnish)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Short form of Susanna. It can also be derived from Swedish sann meaning "true".
Sappho
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Σαπφώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SAP-PAW(Classical Greek) SA-fo(English)
Rating: 24% based on 5 votes
Possibly from Greek σάπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Greek poetess from Lesbos.
Saturnina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish
Pronounced: sa-toor-NEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Saturninus. This was the name of a legendary saint who was supposedly martyred in northern France.
Sauda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Means "dark complexion" in Swahili.
Sayen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous American, Mapuche
Personal remark: seye-YEN.
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Means "sweet, lovely" in Mapuche.
Sayuri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 小百合, etc.(Japanese Kanji) さゆり(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SA-YOO-REE
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (sa) meaning "small" and 百合 (yuri) meaning "lily". This name can also be composed of other kanji combinations.
Scheherazade
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: shə-HEHR-ə-zahd(English)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Anglicized form of Shahrazad.
Seetha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tamil
Other Scripts: சீதா, சீதை(Tamil)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Tamil form of Sita. The name of the mythological figures is சீதை, while சீதா is the spelling used for people.
Ségolène
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-GAW-LEHN
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Possibly a French form of Sieglinde.
Semele
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Σεμέλη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: SEH-MEH-LEH(Classical Greek) SEHM-ə-lee(English)
Personal remark: SEM-uh-lee
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly of Phrygian origin. In Greek mythology she was one of the many lovers of Zeus. Hera, being jealous, tricked Semele into asking Zeus to display himself in all his splendour as the god of thunder. When he did, Semele was struck by lightning and died, but not before giving birth to Dionysos.
Senga
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Sometimes explained as an anagram of Agnes, but more likely derived from Gaelic seang "slender".
Senja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SEHN-yah
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Finnish form of Xenia.
Senka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian
Other Scripts: Сенка(Serbian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "shadow" in Serbian and Croatian. It can also be a diminutive of Ksenija.
Sevda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
Means "love, infatuation" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.
Sévérine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 68% based on 6 votes
Variant of Séverine.
Shiphrah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: שִׁפְרָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 26% based on 5 votes
Means "beautiful" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the midwives who disobeys the Pharaoh's order to kill any Hebrew boys they deliver.
Sibylla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, German
Pronounced: zee-BI-la(German)
Personal remark: sih-BILL-ah
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Latinate form of Sibyl.
Sidonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Georgian
Other Scripts: სიდონია(Georgian)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Sidonius. This is the name of a legendary saint from Georgia. She and her father Abiathar were supposedly converted by Saint Nino from Judaism to Christianity.
Sidonie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEE-DAW-NEE
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
French feminine form of Sidonius.
Sigalit
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: סִיגָלִית(Hebrew)
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Variant of Sigal.
Silvestra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: seel-VEH-stra(Italian)
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Silvester.
Sinikka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SEE-neek-kah
Rating: 28% based on 5 votes
Elaborated form of Sini.
Siriporn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Thai
Other Scripts: ศิริพร(Thai)
Pronounced: see-ree-PAWN
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Derived from Thai ศิริ (sir) meaning "glory, splendour" and พร (phon) meaning "blessing".
Smiljana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Смиљана(Serbian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From Serbo-Croatian word smilje, a type of plant, known as catsfoot or everlasting in English (genus Antennaria).
Snezhana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Снежана(Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Russian, Bulgarian and Macedonian cognate of Snježana.
Solange
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LAHNZH
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
French form of the Late Latin name Sollemnia, which was derived from Latin sollemnis "religious". This was the name of a French shepherdess who became a saint after she was killed by her master.
Sollemnia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Latin form of Solange.
Solveig
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
Pronounced: SOOL-vie(Norwegian) SOOL-vay(Swedish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From an Old Norse name, which was derived from the elements sól "sun" and veig "strength". This is the name of the heroine in Henrik Ibsen's play Peer Gynt (1876).
Sostrate
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Σωστράτη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 27% based on 3 votes
Means "safe army" from Greek σῶς (sos) meaning "safe, whole, unwounded" and στρατός (stratos) meaning "army".
Sotiria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Σωτηρία(Greek)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Sotirios.
Sperantia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Latin form of Esperanza.
Spomenka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Personal remark: spoh-MAYN-kah
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
From Croatian spomenak meaning "forget-me-not flower".
Spyridoula
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Σπυριδούλα(Greek)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Spyridon.
Subira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "patience" in Swahili.
Suvi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: SOO-vee
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "summer" in Finnish.
Suzume
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese (Rare)
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji) すずめ(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: SOO-ZOO-MEH
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Japanese (suzume) meaning "sparrow", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that are pronounced the same way.
Swanhilda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of Swanhild.
Synnöve
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Swedish form of Sunniva.
Tabitha
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ταβιθά(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: TAB-i-thə(English)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show Bewitched, in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.
Tamar
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: תָּמָר(Hebrew) თამარ(Georgian)
Pronounced: TAHM-ahr(English) TAY-mahr(English)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "date palm" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament Tamar was the daughter-in-law of Judah and later his wife. This was also the name of a daughter of King David. She was raped by her half-brother Amnon, leading to his murder by her brother Absalom. The name was borne by a 12th-century ruling queen of Georgia who presided over the kingdom at the peak of its power.
Tanith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars. She was particularly associated with the city of Carthage, being the consort of Ba'al Hammon.
Tasoula
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Τασούλα(Greek)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Greek diminutive of Anastasia.
Tatienne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
French form of Tatiana.
Tellervo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish Mythology
Pronounced: TEHL-lehr-vo(Finnish)
Rating: 55% based on 6 votes
Meaning unknown. Tellervo was a Finnish forest goddess. She is variously described as either the wife or daughter of Tapio.
Teodosija
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Теодосија(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Serbian and Macedonian form of Theodosia.
Tereza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Portuguese (Brazilian), Romanian
Other Scripts: Тереза(Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: TEH-reh-za(Czech) teh-REHZ-a(Romanian)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Form of Theresa in various languages.
Thema
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Akan
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "queen" in Akan.
Therasia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Earliest recorded form of Theresa.
Theudelinda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Old Germanic form of Dietlinde.
Thulile
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Zulu
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "quiet, peaceful" in Zulu.
Tímea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: TEE-meh-aw
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
Created by the Hungarian author Mór Jókai for a character in his novel The Golden Man (1873). The name is apparently based on the Greek word εὐθυμία (euthymia) meaning "good spirits, cheerfulness".
Timothea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1], Greek
Other Scripts: Τιμοθέα(Greek)
Rating: 77% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Timothy.
Tirzah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: תִּרְצָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: TIR-zə(English)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name תִּרְצָה (Tirtzah) meaning "favourable". Tirzah is the name of one of the daughters of Zelophehad in the Old Testament. It also occurs in the Old Testament as a place name, the early residence of the kings of the northern kingdom.
Tovah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טוֹבָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Alternate transcription of Hebrew טוֹבָה (see Tova 1).
Trendafilka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Трендафилка(Macedonian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Derived from Macedonian трендафил (trendafil) meaning "eglantine, sweet briar".
Ulyssa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: yoo-LIS-ə
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Ulysses.
Unnr
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Derived from Old Norse unnr "to wave, to billow" or unna "to love".
Upasana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: उपासना(Hindi)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "worship, devotion" in Sanskrit.
Ustinya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Устинья(Russian)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Russian variant form of Iustina (see Justina).
Valda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Latvian
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Valdis.
Valeria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: va-LEH-rya(Italian) ba-LEH-rya(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
Feminine form of Valerius. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
Valeriana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 50% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Valerianus (see Valerian).
Vangelija
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Macedonian
Other Scripts: Вангелија(Macedonian)
Rating: 18% based on 4 votes
Short form of Evangelija.
Vasilisa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Василиса(Russian)
Pronounced: və-syi-LYEE-sə
Personal remark: vahs-ih-LEES-ah
Rating: 30% based on 5 votes
Russian feminine form of Basil 1.
Verna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: VUR-nə
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Vernon, sometimes associated with the Latin word vernus "spring". It has been in use since the 19th century.
Violetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Russian, Hungarian
Other Scripts: Виолетта(Russian)
Pronounced: vyo-LEHT-ta(Italian) vyi-u-LYEHT-tə(Russian) VEE-o-leht-taw(Hungarian)
Rating: 36% based on 5 votes
Italian, Russian and Hungarian form of Violet.
Višnja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Вишња(Serbian)
Pronounced: VEESH-nya
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "sour cherry" in Croatian and Serbian.
Viviette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Diminutive of Vivienne. William John Locke used this name for the title character in his novel Viviette (1910).
Vjekoslava
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Vjekoslav.
Wilhelmine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: vil-hehl-MEE-nə
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
German feminine form of Wilhelm.
Ximena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khee-MEH-na
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Ximeno. This was the name of the wife of El Cid.
Yesenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: jyeh-SEH-nya, yeh-SEH-nya
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
From Jessenia, the genus name of a variety of palm trees found in South America. As a given name, it was popularized by the writer Yolanda Vargas Dulché in the 1970 Mexican telenovela Yesenia and the 1971 film adaptation [1].
Yevgeniya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Евгения(Russian)
Pronounced: yiv-GYEH-nyi-yə, iv-GYEH-nyi-yə
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Russian form of Eugenia.
Yvonne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: EE-VAWN(French) i-VAHN(English) ee-VAWN(German) ee-VAW-nə(Dutch)
Rating: 64% based on 5 votes
French feminine form of Yvon. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
Zénaïde
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: ZEH-NA-EED
Rating: 56% based on 5 votes
French form of Zenaida.
Zenobia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek [1]
Other Scripts: Ζηνοβία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ZDEH-NO-BEE-A(Classical Greek) zə-NO-bee-ə(English)
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Means "life of Zeus", derived from Greek Ζηνός (Zenos) meaning "of Zeus" and βίος (bios) meaning "life". This was the name of a 3rd-century queen of Palmyra. After claiming the title Queen of the East and expanding her realm into Roman territory she was defeated by Emperor Aurelian. Her Greek name was used as an approximation of her native Aramaic name.
Zinnia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ZIN-ee-ə
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
From the name of the flower, which was itself named for the German botanist Johann Zinn.
Zinoviya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian (Rare), Ukrainian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Зиновия(Russian) Зіновія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: zyi-NO-vyi-yə(Russian)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Russian and Ukrainian form of Zenobia.
Zita 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian, Latvian
Pronounced: DZEE-ta(Italian) TSEE-ta(German) ZI-ta(Czech) ZEE-ta(Slovak) zyi-TU(Lithuanian)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.
Živa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slavic Mythology, Slovene
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "living, alive" in Slavic. This was the name of a Slavic goddess associated with life, fertility and spring.
Ziva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זִיוָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Ziv.
Zivit
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: זִיוִית(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of Ziv.
Zorica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Зорица(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Serbian, Croatian and Macedonian diminutive of Zora.
Zsuzsanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: ZHOO-zhawn-naw
Rating: 30% based on 4 votes
Hungarian form of Susanna.
Zuri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "beautiful" in Swahili.
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