Lady_Skywalker's Personal Name List

ADALINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AD-ə-lien
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of ADELINA.
ADALLAND
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Rating: 30% based on 1 vote
Means "noble land", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with land "land."
ADELILA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
AGATHANGELOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀγαθάγγελος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Means "bearer of good news", derived from Greek ἀγαθός (agathos) meaning "good" and ἄγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger, angel". Saint Agathangelus of Rome was a 4th-century deacon who was martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian.
AIDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən(English)
Rating: 60% based on 1 vote
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable den suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AINARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque, Spanish
Pronounced: ie-NA-ra(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 1 vote
Variant of ENARA.
AIVAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Estonian
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Estonian form of IVAR.
ALEXANDERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British, Rare), Scottish (Rare, Archaic)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of ALEXANDER.
ALEXANDREINA
Usage: Romanian (Rare)
Pronounced: ah-legs-AHN-dray-nah
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
ALEXANDRETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British, Rare, Archaic), Scottish (Rare, Archaic)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Combination of ALEXANDRA with the suffix -etta.
ALEXISTRATOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀλεξίστρατος(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Derived from the Greek verb ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend" as well as "to help" combined with the Greek noun στρατός (stratos) meaning "army".
ALVEREY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Rating: 20% based on 4 votes
Medieval form of AUBREY or AVERY.
ALVERY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Anglo-Norman (Anglicized, Rare, Archaic)
Pronounced: al-ver-ee
Rating: 13% based on 4 votes
Norman French form of Alverad
AMALASUINTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic [1]
Rating: 40% based on 1 vote
Old Germanic form of MILLICENT.
ANDREINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Feminine form of ANDREA (1).
ANDRIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Ανδριάνα(Greek) Андриана(Bulgarian)
Feminine form of ANDREAS (Greek) or ANDREY (Bulgarian).
ANGELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Ангелина(Russian) Αγγελίνα(Greek)
Pronounced: ang-jeh-LEE-na(Italian) an-jə-LEE-nə(English) un-gyi-LYEE-nə(Russian) ang-kheh-LEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).
ANGELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: AHN-ZHU-LEEN, AHN-ZHLEEN
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
French diminutive of ANGELA.
ANGELIQUE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Rating: 10% based on 1 vote
Dutch form of ANGÉLIQUE.
ANGELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: ANG-jeh-lo
Italian form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ARAN (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
From the name of the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland.
ARAWN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the god of the underworld, called Annwfn, in Welsh mythology.
AREIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀρεία(Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek ἀρεία (areia) meaning "warlike, martial", literally "of Ares, devoted to Ares", the feminine form of ἄρειος (areios) (see AREIOS). This was an epithet of the goddesses Aphrodite and Athena. In some Greek myths this name was also borne by the mother of Miletus, founder of the ancient city of Miletus.
ARIOCH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Judeo-Christian Legend, Hebrew
Pronounced: A´rEok(Biblical English, Judeo-Christian Legend, Hebrew)
Rating: 3% based on 3 votes
Meaning: "a fierce lion" or "lion-like" and "venerable".

This was the name of two biblical men, Arioch was a king of Ellasar who was allied with Chedorlaomer (Gen. 14:1,9) and Captain of Nebuchadnezzar's guard (Dan. 2:14-15, 24-25).

Originally appears in the Book of Genesis chap. 14 as the "King of Ellasar", part of the confederation of kings who did battle with the kings of Sodom and Gomorrah and with Abraham in the vale of Siddim.

ARRAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
From the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland in the Firth of Clyde.
ARTEMISIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀρτεμισία(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
ASELYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Әселя(Kazakh) Аселя(Kyrgyz)
Variant of ASEL.
AUSTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "south" in Latin (descended from an Indo-European root meaning "dawn", making it related to the English word east). Auster was the Roman god of the south wind.
AVA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-və
Rating: 40% based on 4 votes
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990). This name became very popular throughout the English-speaking world in the early 21st century, entering the top ten for girls in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.
AVERICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Pronounced: AV-rik
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Manx form of AIFRIC, from Gaelic aith-bhric or ath-breac meaning "somewhat dappled, speckled". According to 'An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language' (1896) by Alexander MacBain, the old Gaelic feminine name Affric belonged to a water nymph in local folklore who gave her name to the river Affric (which itself gave its name to the Scottish glen and loch Affric).
AVONLEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
Created by Lucy Maud Montgomery as the setting for her novel Anne of Green Gables (1908). She may have based the name on the Arthurian island of AVALON, though it also resembles the river name AVON and leah "woodland, clearing".
BERNADETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: BEHR-NA-DEHT(French) bər-nə-DEHT(English)
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.
BOADICEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Pronounced: bo-di-SEE-ə(English)
Medieval variant of BOUDICCA, possibly arising from a scribal error.
BOHDAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Polish
Other Scripts: Богдан(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: BOH-dan(Czech) BAWH-dan(Slovak) bogh-DAHN(Ukrainian)
Czech, Slovak and Ukrainian form of BOGDAN, as well as a Polish variant.
BOUDICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Pronounced: BOO-di-kə(English)
Variant of BOUDICCA.
BRANGEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Irish
Rating: 8% based on 4 votes
Derived from the Archaic or Primitive Irish ᚁᚏᚐᚅᚑᚌᚓᚅᚔ (Branogeni) meaning "raven clan".
BRENYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American)
Pronounced: Bren-ya(American English)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
BRIDGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BRIJ-ər
From an English surname that originally indicated a person who lived near or worked on a bridge.
CAELIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Roman family name that was derived from Latin caelum meaning "heaven".
CAELUM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: KIE-loom(Latin) KAY-ləm(English)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
The name of a faint constellation in the southern sky, which is from Latin caelum meaning "heaven, sky" (compare CAELIUS) or (allegedly) "burin" (a tool for engraving on copper or other metals).
CAESONIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of CAESONIUS. This name was borne by Milonia Caesonia, the last wife of the Roman emperor Caligula.
CAIRISTÌONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Scottish form of CHRISTINA.
CAISIDE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Irish
Old Irish byname meaning "curly haired", from Irish Gaelic cas.
CARASYNTHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
Carasynthia "Cara" Dune is a Human female Alderaanian who served in the Rebel Alliance as a shock trooper, and who later became a mercenary in the Star Wars Disney+ series The Mandalorian.
CASPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Pronounced: KAHS-pər(Dutch) KAHS-pehr(Swedish) KAS-bu(Danish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Dutch and Scandinavian form of JASPER. This is the name of a friendly ghost in an American series of cartoons and comic books (beginning 1945).
CECILY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SEHS-ə-lee
Rating: 90% based on 1 vote
English form of CECILIA. This was the usual English form during the Middle Ages.
CHRISTIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Late Roman
Pronounced: kris-tee-AN-ə(English) kris-TYAN-ə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, French
Pronounced: kris-TYA-nə(German) KREES-TYAN(French)
German and French feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTOFOROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Χριστόφορος(Greek)
Modern Greek form of CHRISTOPHER.
CLAUDENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Portuguese elaborated from CLAUDIA.
CLAUDETTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Elaboration of CLAUDETTA.
CORBELIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
CORBY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
CORTLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KORT-lan
Variant of COURTLAND.
CULLY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: CUL-ee(Popular Culture)
Transferred use of the surname Cully.

Cully Barnaby is the daughter of D.C.I. Tom Barnaby in the 'Midsomer Murders' novels and TV show. From the town of Cully in Switzerland, which is derived from the Roman family name Coclius, of unknown meaning.

DAGGEIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Icelandic combination of dagr "day" and geirr "spear".
DANIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: DA-NYEHL(French) dan-YEHL(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
French feminine form of DANIEL. It has been commonly used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
DARLEY
Usage: English
Personal note: F
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "person from Darley", Derbyshire ("glade frequented by deer").
DULCELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval French (Latinized), Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of DOUCELINE (compare DULCELINUS).
DULCIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DUL-see
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From Latin dulcis meaning "sweet". It was used in the Middle Ages in the spellings Dowse and Duce, and was recoined in the 19th century.
DULCINEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Derived from Spanish dulce meaning "sweet". This name was (first?) used by Miguel de Cervantes in his novel Don Quixote (1605), where it belongs to the love interest of the main character, though she never actually appears in the story.
ELBY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: EL-bee
English form of ÆLFWIG.
ELENITSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ελενίτσα(Greek)
Diminutive of ELENI.
ELENOA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Fijian, Tongan
EMERIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Shorter form of EMERENTIA.

According to "'Ancient Magnificence': St Andrews in the Middle Ages", this name belonged to one of the three consecrated virgins, along with Saint TRIDUANA, who accompanied Saint REGULUS to Scotland with the bones of Saint ANDREW.

EMILINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various (Rare), History
ERET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Sami
Sami form of ERIK.
ESMÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British), Dutch
Pronounced: EHZ-may(English) EHZ-mee(English) ehs-MEH(Dutch)
Feminine form of ESMÉ.
ETHLYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: eth-lin
Contracted form of ETHELYN.
EVERELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British, Rare)
Pronounced: Everelda(British English)
Variant of EVERILD.
FREDERIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, Flemish, Latvian (Rare), Slovak, Swedish (Rare)
Feminine form of FREDERIK.
GALIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval German, Medieval English
Medieval German and English form of Galianus / Galienus. As a German name, it was recorded in German-speaking Switzerland in the 1400s.
GARANWYN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Derived from garan meaning "heron" and gwynn meaning "white".
HESTHER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Old Swedish
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Old Swedish variant of HESTER.
HILDERIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic, History
Derived from Old Norse hildr "battle" combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler." Hilderic was king of the Vandals and the Alans in the 6th century AD.
HRAFN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Pronounced: RAPN(Icelandic)
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
ILEANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ee-LYA-na(Romanian)
Possibly a Romanian variant of ELENA. In Romanian folklore this is the name of a princess kidnapped by monsters and rescued by a heroic knight.
ISALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
The name of the wives of Józef Boruwłaski, Daniel Lambert, and Ignace Nau.
ISLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Brazilian (Rare), Medieval German (Rare)
As a medieval German name, some academics consider this name to be derived from a Latin dative form of ISLA.
JUSTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, Dutch, German
Pronounced: ZHUYS-TEEN(French) jus-TEEN(English)
French form of Iustina (see JUSTINA). This is the name of the heroine in the novel Justine (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
KALLIXENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Καλλιξένα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of KALLIXENOS.
KASHMALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Pashto, Urdu, Pakistani
Other Scripts: کشمالہ(Urdu) کشماله(Pashto)
Means "basilica flower" in Pashto.
KATELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Basque adaption of CATELINE.
KATELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), French (Rare), French (Quebec, Rare), French (Swiss, Rare), Walloon (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Variant of CATELINE.
KATIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: ka-TEE-da
From Esperanto katido meaning "kitten", ultimately from Latin cattus.
KATLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Feminine form of KETIL.
KENDAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KEHN-dəl
From a surname that was a variant of KENDALL.
KENDALL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEHN-dəl
From a surname that comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KENNEDY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Irish
Pronounced: KEHN-ə-dee(English)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG". The name is often given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963).
KESTON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KES-tən
Derived from the English surname of Keston, of which the meaning is a bit uncertain. The surname probably derives its name from the parish of Keston, which is nowadays a suburban area in London. In turn, the parish is said to have derived its name from Anglo-Saxon Cysse stan meaning "the stone of Cyssa". Cyssa (which is also found spelled as CISSA) is an Anglo-Saxon masculine given name of uncertain meaning. So, in short: the parish had originally been named after a man named Cyssa.

However, there is one other possible etymology for the surname: one source claims that it was derived from an Old French form of the given name CHRISTIAN, which had been introduced to England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. This seems possible in theory, if only for the visual similarities between Keston and Christian.

With that said, known bearers of Keston as a given name include the British poet Keston Sutherland (b. 1976), the Trinidadian sprint athlete Keston Bledman (b. 1988) and the Guyanese-Sint Maartener cricketer Keston Dornick (b. 1988).

KIPPER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Old English for "male salmon".
KORIOLAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Polish, Serbian
Other Scripts: Кориолан(Serbian)
Croatian, Polish and Serbian form of CORIOLANUS.
LÉLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
French form of LAELIA.
LIANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Afrikaans
Pronounced: lee-AHN-ee(English)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
LUCILIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
English form of LUCILIANUS.
LUCINIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
MAËLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of MAËL.
MAGDALEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAG-də-lən
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Variant of MAGDALENE.
MAGGIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAG-ee
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARLOW
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAWR-lo
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Variant of MARLOWE.
MARLOWE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MAHR-lo
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English playwright Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593).
MAXIMILIANUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman form of MAXIMILIAN.
MAXIMILIENNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: MAK-SEE-MEE-LYEHN
French feminine form of MAXIMILIAN.
MENNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic (Egyptian)
Other Scripts: منّة(Arabic)
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
Means "favour, grace" in Arabic.
MERIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
The name of the main character in the Disney/Pixar movie Brave (2012) about a medieval Scottish princess. The meaning of her name is unexplained, though it could be based on the Spanish city of Mérida, derived from Latin Emerita Augusta meaning "veterans of AUGUSTUS", so named because it was founded by the emperor Augustus as a colony for his veterans.
MEROË
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Literature
Pronounced: MER-o-ee(English) MER-o-ay(English)
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
The name of a witch in Lucius Apuleius's 2nd-century Latin novel 'The Golden Ass', who murders a man named Socrates with her accomplice Panthia. It was probably taken from the name of an ancient city on the Nile.

In the English-speaking world, Meroë and its variant Meroe have been used occasionally since the 19th century.

MILEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Serbian, Macedonian
Other Scripts: Милева(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MIRONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish (Rare), Romanian
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Miron.
MYRIANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek (Rare), Greek (Cypriot, Rare)
Other Scripts: Μυριάνθη(Greek)
Rating: 0% based on 3 votes
The first element of this name is derived from Greek μυριάς (myrias) meaning "ten thousand", which is ultimately derived from Greek μυρίος (myrios) meaning "countless, numberless, infinite". Also compare the English word myriad. The second element is derived from Greek ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". As such, the meaning of this name is basically "ten thousand flowers" or "countless of flowers".
NAOMHÁN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Means "little saint", derived from Irish naomh "saint" combined with a diminutive suffix.
NATALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese
Diminutive of NATALIA.
NAVERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Pakistani
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
NEVAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: NEHV-an
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.
NIKOLAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Николай(Russian, Bulgarian)
Pronounced: nyi-ku-LIE(Russian)
Alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Николай (see NIKOLAY).
NIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Pronounced: NIKS(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Variant spelling of NYX.
NIX
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Germanic Mythology
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
This is the name of masculine shapeshifting water spirits in Germanic mythology, who apparently derive their name from Proto-Germanic nikwus or nikwis(i) "wash". See also NIXE for the female counterpart(s).
NOLANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Either derived from the flower of the same name or else intended as a feminine form of NOLAN.
NYX
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νύξ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NUYKS(Classical Greek) NIKS(English)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Means "night" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the night, the daughter of Khaos and the wife of Erebos.
ÓINN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from óa-sk ("to be frightened"). In Norse mythology this is the name of a dwarf and a kenning for "snake".
OLLISTER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Manx cognate of ALASDAIR.
ORIANTHI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek (Rare)
Other Scripts: Οριάνθη(Greek)
Probably derived from the Greek noun ὄρος (oros) meaning "mountain, hill" (compare ORESTES) combined with the Greek noun ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". Also compare the similar-looking name ORINTHIA, which can even be an anagram of Orianthi, if you move the letters around a bit.

This name is best known for being the name of the Australian singer-songwriter Orianthi Panagaris (b. 1985), who is of Greek descent.

ORIELLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (British)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of ORIA.
ORIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
"My light is God."
PALESA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Southern African, Sotho
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "flower" in Sotho.
PUSHMATAHA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Choctaw
Pronounced: puwsh-mə-TAH-hah(English)
Meaning uncertain, though scholars agree that it suggests connotations of "ending"; possible meanings include "the warrior's seat is finished", "he has won all the honors of his race", and, from Apushamatahahubi, "a messenger of death" (literally "one whose rifle, tomahawk, or bow is alike fatal in war or hunting"). This was the name of a Choctaw leader who was highly regarded for his skill in both war and diplomacy.
QAIYAAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Inuit
Pronounced: KI-yawn(Inuktitut)
QUETZALLI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Native American, Nahuatl
Means "feather, precious thing" in Nahuatl.
QUINNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare)
Feminine elaboration of QUINN.
ROSANIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Folklore
Probably an elaboration of ROSE. This is the name of a princess in the fairy tale 'Ricdin-Ricdon' by Marie-Jeanne L'Héritier. It was also used by the Comte de Caylus for the titular princess in his fairy tale 'Rosanie' (usually known in English as 'Rosanella').
ROXINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: South American (Rare), American (Rare, ?)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Variant of ROXANA. It may have been modified on MAXINA/REXINA.
ROZELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
RUAIDHRÍ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ROR-ee
Means "red king" from Irish ruadh "red" combined with "king". This was the name of the last high king of Ireland, reigning in the 12th century.
SABINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Сабина(Russian)
Pronounced: sa-BEE-na(Italian, Spanish) sa-BYEE-na(Polish) SA-bi-na(Czech)
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "a Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
SABINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German, Danish
Pronounced: SA-BEEN(French) za-BEE-nə(German)
French, German and Danish form of SABINA.
SADIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Persian form of SIDRA.
SARAHILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German saro "armor" combined with Old Norse hildr "battle."
SARAID
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Means "excellent" in Irish Gaelic.
SÁRIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Hungarian diminutive of SARAH.
SHIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שִׁירָה(Hebrew)
Means "singing" in Hebrew.
SIDONIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEE-DAW-NEE
French feminine form of SIDONIUS.
SIGI
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: German
Diminutive of SIEGFRIED, SIEGLINDE, and other Germanic names beginning with the element sigu meaning "victory".
STONE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: STON
From the English vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English stan.
STRYKER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Of uncertain origin. Possibly a transferred use of the surname STRYKER. Alternately, from the Norwegian words stryker meaning "stretcher" or from stryke (“use a bow”) +‎ -er or from stryker, indefinite plural strykere, meaning a string player (musician who plays a string instrument).
SVETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Света(Russian)
Short form of SVETLANA.
SYLVANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Combination of SYLVESTER and ANDERS
TESNI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Means "warmth from the sun" in Welsh.
THEODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεοδώρα(Greek)
Pronounced: thee-ə-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THEONAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Θεωνᾶς(Ancient Greek)
Possibly a variant of THEON. This belonged to a 3rd-century patriarch of Alexandria who is venerated as a saint as well as others.
ÞÓRKETILL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian [1]
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Old Norse form of TORKEL.
ÞORSTEINÍNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Rare)
Feminine coinage derived from ÞORSTEINN plus the ending 'ína'.
ÚLFUR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic form of ULF.
ULLR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Germanic Mythology
Ullr is the name of an old Norse god. In the Edda, he's a son of SIF and a stepson of THOR.

His name derives from Gothic wulþus "glory".

ULRIC
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: UWL-rik
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf ruler". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of ULRICH.
ULRICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Ancient Germanic [1]
Pronounced: UWL-rikh(German)
From the Germanic name Odalric meaning "prosperity and power", from the element odal "heritage" combined with ric "ruler, mighty". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Hulderic. This was the name of two German saints. Another famous bearer was Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), also known as Huldrych, the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland.
VALERIY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Other Scripts: Валерий(Russian) Валерій(Ukrainian) Валерый(Belarusian)
Pronounced: vu-LYEH-ryee(Russian)
Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian form of VALERIUS.
VALTÝR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Combination of Old Norse valr "the slain (in Valhalla)" and tívar "gods".
VANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American, Brazilian
Pronounced: VAN-der
Probably a contraction of the two words van der "from the" occurring as part of Dutch surnames like van der Waal promoted to a given name.
VASILIY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Василий(Russian)
Pronounced: vu-SYEE-lyee
Russian form of BASIL (1).
VATNARR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Germanic name elements vatn "water, waters, river, brook, tears" and herr "army". Vatnarr was the name of a legendary Norwegian king.
VEIGAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic combination of veig "power", "strength" and herr "army".
VIDAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Pronounced: VEE-dahr(Swedish)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
From the Old Norse Víðarr, which is possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, he will avenge his father's death.
VIGGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: VEE-go(Danish) VIG-go(Swedish)
Short form of names containing the Old Norse element víg "war".
VIGNIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic younger form of VÍGNIR.
VÍGR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian
From Old Norse vígr meaning "in fighting condition, able to fight".
VÍGÞÓR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic name with the combination of víg "battle, fight" and þórr "thunder".
VINDKALDR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Means "wind-frozen". SVIPDAGR uses this as an alias when he goes to woo MENGLǪÐ.
VINJAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Either derived from of Old Norse vinr "friend" and herr "army" or based on place names that contains the Old Norse element vin "meadow, pasture".
VÍÐARR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Old Norse form of VIDAR.
VIÐBJÖRN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse viðr "tree" combined with Old Norse björn "bear".
VIÐFASTR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Germanic name elements viðr "forest, wood, tree" and fastr "firmly, fast".
WALELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Cherokee (Rare)
Pronounced: Wa-lay-la
From Cherokee wa le lua meaning "hummingbird".
WILHELMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, English
Pronounced: vil-hehl-MEE-na(Dutch, German) wil-ə-MEEN-ə(English) wil-hehl-MEEN-ə(English)
Dutch and German feminine form of WILHELM. This name was borne by a queen of the Netherlands (1880-1962).
WILLAMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
A feminine form of WILLIAM or a contraction of WILHELMINA.
WILLEMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: vi-lə-MEE-nah
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Feminine form of WILLEM.
WILLOBY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of WILLOUGHBY.
WILLORY
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Transferred use of the rare surname Willory.
XANTHEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: ZAN-thee-ə
Variant of XANTHIA.
XENANDROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξένανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Means "foreign man", derived from Greek ξενος (xenos) "foreign, strange" combined with Greek ανδρος (andros) "of a man".
XENODORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξενοδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Means "foreign gift" or "gift from/to a guest", derived from Greek ξενος (xenos) meaning "foreign, strange; guest" combined with δωρον (doron) meaning "gift".
XIAMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Aramaic
Pronounced: zee-ah-MAH-ra(Aramaic)
Means "joyful deer" in Aramaic.
XINNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
A variation of Zinnia. Possibly a variation of Xinia or Xenia.
XYLON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: ξύλον(Greek)
Pronounced: zigh-lawn like silon but with z sound
Derived from Greek xylon "timber".
YLENIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Variant of ILENIA.
ZARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Urdu, Malay
Other Scripts: Зарина(Kazakh) زرینہ(Urdu)
From Persian زرین (zarin) meaning "golden". According to the 5th-century BC Greek historian Ctesias, this was the name of a Scythian queen.
ZEINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: زينة(Arabic)
Variant transcription of ZAYNA.
ZERINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bosnian
Bosnian form of ZARINA.
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