jfifles's Personal Name List

AALIYAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: عالية(Arabic)
Pronounced: ‘A-lee-yah(Arabic) ə-LEE-ə(English) ah-LEE-ə(English)
Feminine form of AALI. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the singer Aaliyah Haughton (1979-2001), who was known simply as Aaliyah.
ABDERRAMÃO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Rare)
Portuguese form of ABD AL-RAHMAN.
ABDULAZIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino, Maranao, Maguindanao, Indonesian
Maranao, Maguindanao and Indonesian form of ABD AL-AZIZ.
ABDULMASIH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: عبد المسيح(Arabic)
Means "servant of the Messiah" in Arabic.
ABRAHAMINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish (Rare)
Feminine form of ABRAHAM.
ACE (1)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AYS
From the English word meaning "highest rank". More commonly a nickname, it is occasionally used as a given name.
ADIPUTRA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
From Indonesian adi meaning "first" (of Sanskrit origin) combined with putra meaning "son, prince".
ADITYAS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Means "of ADITI", referring to the offspring of the Hindu goddess.
ADÔNIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of ADONIS.
ADONIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἄδωνις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-DAW-NEES(Classical Greek) ə-DAHN-is(English) ə-DO-nis(English)
From Phoenician adon meaning "lord". In Greek myth Adonis was a handsome young shepherd killed while hunting a wild boar. The anemone flower is said to have sprung from his blood. Because he was loved by Aphrodite, Zeus allowed him to be restored to life for part of each year. The Greeks borrowed this character from Semitic traditions, originally Sumerian (see DUMUZI).
ÆGIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Means "sea, ocean" in Old Norse. Ægir was the Norse god of the sea, whom sailors both worshipped and feared, for they believed he would occasionally appear on the surface to take ships, men and cargo alike, with him to his hall at the bottom of the ocean.
AIRLANGGA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦄꦲꦶꦂꦭꦁꦒ(Javanese)
Pronounced: a-ir-LANG-ga(Indonesian)
Means "jumping water" or "crossing water", from Indonesian air meaning "water" combined with Sanskrit लङ्घन (langhana) meaning "passing over, jumping, crossing". This was the name of the only raja of the 11th century kingdom of Kahuripan in present-day East Java.
ALADINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ALADDIN.
ALANIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-LAN-is
Feminine form of ALAN. Canadian musician Alanis Morissette (1974-) was named after her father Alan. Her parents apparently decided to use this particular spelling after seeing this word in a Greek newspaper.
ALCÂNTARA
Usage: Portuguese
Pronounced: owk-UN-ta-ru(Brazilian Portuguese) alk-UN-tu-ru(European Portuguese)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 1164)
Portuguese cognate of ALCÁNTARA.
ALEMÃO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "German" in Portuguese.
ALEXIEL
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ah-lek-see-EL
Combination of the name ALEXIS with EL or ELLE.
ALEXZ
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: alEKS, A-likz
Variant of ALEX.
ALIX
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-LEEKS
Medieval French variant of ALICE.
ALKAID
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Filipino, Astronomy
Means "the leader", derived from Arabic قائد بنات نعش qā'id bināt naʿsh, meaning "leader of the daughters of the bier". This is the traditional name of the star Eta Ursae Majoris in the constellation Ursa Major.
AMORE
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Italian
Italian form of AMOR.
AMORÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Afrikaans (Modern)
Afrikaans form of AMORE.
ANACÃ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Derived from anacã, which is the (Brazilian) Portuguese name for an Amazonian bird that is known as the red-fan parrot in English.

A known recent bearer of this name is the son (born in October 2016) of the South African supermodel Candice Swanepoel (b. 1988) and her partner Hermann Nicoli Rosa (b. 1982), a Brazilian male model.

ANGELOPOULOS
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Αγγελόπουλος(Greek)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 1190)
From the personal name ANGELOS or a shortened form of the personal name EVANGELOS + the patronymic ending -poulos.
ANGGRAENI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: ang-GRIE-nee
Variant of ANGGRAINI.
ANGGRAINI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian Mythology, Javanese
Pronounced: ang-GRIE-nee(Indonesian)
Derived from Javanese anggara meaning "Tuesday", ultimately from Sanskrit अङ्गार (angara). In the Javanese version of the Hindu epic Mahabharata, this is the name of a princess and the wife of Ekalavya.
ANNAVIEVE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Blend of ANNA and GENEVIEVE.
APHRAH
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, English (Puritan)
Pronounced: AH-frah(English)
From the biblical place Aphrah in the Book of Micah, meaning "dust." This name was used by Puritans, but has since become rare.
APOLLOGENES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀπολλογένης(Ancient Greek)
Derived from the name of the god APOLLO combined with Greek γενης (genes) meaning "born". This name was borne by an eponymous archon of Athens, who lived in the 1st century BC.
APOLLOKRATES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀπολλοκράτης(Ancient Greek)
Derived from the name of the god APOLLO combined with Greek κρατος (kratos) "power."
AQNES
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare)
Indonesian form of AGNES.
AQUARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: uh-KWAR-ee-uh
Feminine form of AQUARIUS.
ARCANGELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Means "archangel" in Italian.
ARCHANGE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
French cognate of ARCANGELO.
ARÍA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Modern, Rare)
Icelandic form of Aria.
ARIADNI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Other Scripts: Αριάδνη(Greek)
Modern Greek transcription of ARIADNE.
ARIADNIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French, Scottish
Alternate spelling of ARIADNE
ARIMATEIA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare), Biblical Portuguese
Portuguese form of the biblical place name ARIMATHEA, given in reference to Joseph of Arimathea (José de Arimateia in Portuguese), a disciple of Jesus.
ARJAY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Phonetic spelling of the initials RJ.
ARMENÍA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Modern, Rare)
Icelandic form of ARMENIA.
ARTEMIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Mexican), Italian (Tuscan, Rare), Sicilian, Polish
Italian and Spanish feminine form of ARTEMIO, Sicilian feminine form of ARTEMIU and Polish feminine form of ARTEMIUSZ.
ARYA (1)
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Persian, Indian, Hindi, Malayalam
Other Scripts: آریا(Persian) आर्य, आर्या(Hindi) ആര്യ, ആര്യാ(Malayalam)
From an old Indo-Iranian root meaning "Aryan, noble". In India, this is a transcription of both the masculine form आर्य and the feminine form आर्या. In Iran it is only a masculine name.
ASENACA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Fijian
Fijian form of ASENATH.
ASENATH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אָסְנַת(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: AS-ə-nath(English)
Means "devoted to the goddess NEITH" in Ancient Egyptian. In the Old Testament this is the name of Joseph's Egyptian wife. She was the mother of Manasseh and Ephraim.
ATENODORO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Mexican, Rare), Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Spanish and Portuguese form of ATHENODORUS.
ATMOJO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦄꦠ꧀ꦩꦺꦴꦗꦺꦴ(Javanese)
Pronounced: at-MO-jo(Indonesian)
From Sanskrit आत्मज (atmaja) meaning "son, child", ultimately from आत्मा (atma) meaning "soul, spirit".
ATRÉJU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Created by German author Michael Ende for the hero of his fantasy novel 'Die unendliche Geschichte' (1979; English: 'The Neverending Story'). The character is a boy warrior whose name is explained as meaning "son of all" in his fictional native language, given to him because he was raised by all of the members of his village after being orphaned as a newborn.
ATREYU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature (Anglicized)
Pronounced: ə-TRAY-oo
Anglicized variant of ATRÉJU, which was created by German author Michael Ende for the hero of his fantasy novel 'Die unendliche Geschichte' (1979; English: 'The Neverending Story'). The character is a boy warrior whose name is explained as meaning "son of all" in his fictional native language, given to him because he was raised by all of the members of his village after being orphaned as a newborn.

Current usage is influenced by the name of a Californian metal-core band named after the hero in 'The neverending story'.

AURORALYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Combination of AURORA and LYN.
AVANCEÑA
Usage: Filipino
Pronounced: A-ban-seh-nya(Tagalog)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 21601)
Hispanicised form of Arabic اِبْن سِينَا‎ (ibn sīnā) meaning "son of Sina". This was the Arabic name for Avicenna (980-1037), a Persian polymath.
AZARIA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English (Modern)
Other Scripts: עֲזַרְיָה(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of AZARIAH (masculine), as well as a feminine variant in the English-speaking world.
BAGATSING
Usage: Filipino
Filipinized form of Bhagat Singh, a combination of Sanskrit भगत (bhagat) meaning "devotee, follower" combined with सिंह (siṃhá) meaning "lion". A notable bearer was RAMON Bagatsing (1916-2006), the 19th Mayor of Manila who was of Indian descent.
BAHRI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Turkish, Indonesian, Albanian
Other Scripts: بحري(Arabic)
Pronounced: BAH-ree(Arabic, Indonesian) BAKH-ree(Turkish)
Means "maritime, nautical, marine" in Arabic, a derivative of بحر (bahr) meaning "sea".
BAPHOMET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend, Popular Culture
Pronounced: ba-fo-met
Probably from a medieval corruption of MAHOMET. This appears in the Inquisition of the Knights Templar as the name of an alleged Muslim or pagan idol. In the 19th century it became associated with a Western occult symbol drawn by Eliphas Lévi, a "Sabbatic Goat" image depicting a demonic horned god.
BARTHOLOMEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, English
Dutch and English feminine form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BASTÍAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic, Spanish
Icelandic and Spanish form of BASTIAN.
BATMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese, Popular Culture
From a Jawi rendering of पत्मन् (patman), meaning "path" in Sanskrit. A notable bearer of this name is Batman bin-SUPARMAN, a Singaporean man imprisoned for drugs, who was rumored to be named after the DC comics superhero.

Batman is the superhero name of billionaire BRUCE WAYNE, of DC's Batman line of comics. He is a regular man who, upon the murder of his parents as a child, decided to use his money to become a vigilante hero and bring justice to his corrupt hometown of Gotham. His name Batman comes from the fact his costume resembles a bat.

Alternatively, Batman may come from the surname Bateman, meaning "servant of BARTHOLOMEW".

BEAUTY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Popular Culture, South African
Pronounced: BYOO-tee(English)
From the English word "beauty", ultimately derived from Latin bellus, "beautiful".

In some variations of the fairytale "Beauty and the Beast", the character of BELLE is occasionally referred to as Beauty. In American author Bill Willingham's popular comic series 'Fables', published by DC comics imprint Vertigo, the two protagonists of 'Beauty and the Beast' are married and most commonly go by the names Beauty and Beast, respectively.

BENNEDICT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian, Rare), English (Canadian, Rare)
Variant of BENEDICT.
BENONI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: בֶּן־אוֹנִי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: Ben-o-nee(Biblical English) Ben-o-ni(Biblical English)
From the Hebrew name בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow". This was the original name of BENJAMIN ("son of the right hand"), whose father, Jacob, renamed him in Genesis 35:18 (the name Benoni having been given by his mother, Rachel).
BENÓNÝ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic form of BENONI.
BETHNE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian, Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: BETH-ə-nee(Australian English)
Variation of BETHANY influenced by DAPHNE.
BETTYJANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American)
Pronounced: be-tee-JAYN(American English)
Combination of BETTY and JANE.
BEYONCÉ
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture, English (Rare)
Variant of the surname BEYINCÉ.

It was popularized by singer Beyoncé Knowles whose given name comes from her mother's maiden name which is Beyincé.

BIANCAMARIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: BYANG-ka-ma-REE-a
Combination of BIANCA and MARIA. A notable bearer of this name is Biancamaria Furgeri, an Italian musician, and Biancamaria Frabotta, an Italian writer.
BILLIEJO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (South), English (Rare)
Combination of BILLIE and JO. Also, see its male counterpart: BILLYJOE.
BOBBYJOE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (South, Rare), English (British, Rare)
Combination of BOBBY and JOE. BOBBIJO is the feminine counterpart.
BOCORNY
Usage: Brazilian (Latinized, Rare)
Brazilian corrupted form of POKORNY.
BODHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: BO-dee
From a term referring to enlightenment in Buddhism, derived from Sanskrit बोधि (bodhi).
BODHISATTVA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Theology
Sanskrit, "enlightened" (bodhi) "being" (sattva)
BONES
Usage: English
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 582)
Derives from bon, "good" in Old French.
BONIFASIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Indonesian variant of BONIFACE
BORUCHEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish
Combination of BARUCH and ISRAEL and variants alike, meaning Bless Israel. Common nickname upon Jews with these two names.
BOTROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Coptic
Other Scripts: بطرس(Arabic)
Pronounced: BOOT-roos(Arabic)
Alternate transcription of Arabic بطرس (see BUTRUS).
BOUTROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Coptic
Other Scripts: بطرس(Arabic)
Pronounced: BOOT-roos(Arabic)
Alternate transcription of Arabic بطرس (see BUTRUS).
BRAGANÇA
Usage: Portuguese
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 16506)
From the city of Bragança in Portugal. It's also the name of the Royal House that ruled Portugal from 1640 to 1910.
BRHIANNON
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian, Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: bree-AN-ən(English)
Extremely rare variant of BRIANA with the spelling of RHIANNON (See also BRIHANNA).
BRUNELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Afrikaans, Italian
Variant form of BRUNILDA, which is the Italian form of BRÜNHILD. This name is also frequently used in South Africa.
BUBBA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Popular Culture
Pronounced: BUB-ə
From the nickname, a Southern U.S. corruption (nursery form?) of the word brother. This is a derogatory slang term meaning "Southern white hick", originally used in the Southern states to indicate "brother".
BULEUËN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Acehnese
Means "moon, month" in Acehnese.
BURGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch (Rare), Afrikaans (Rare), West Frisian (Archaic)
Pronounced: BUR-khər(Dutch) BUR-gər(Dutch)
Dutch, Afrikaans and West Frisian form of the ancient Germanic name BURGHAR.

This given name is very rare in the Netherlands nowadays and is likely to remain so, since burger is also a regular word in Dutch. It usually means "citizen", but it can also be a short form of the word hamburger meaning "hamburger". Interestingly, in both cases, the word is etymologically related to the name. Also compare BIRGER.

A known bearer of this name is the South African shot putter Burger Lambrechts (b. 1973).

BUTRUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Coptic
Other Scripts: بطرس(Arabic)
Pronounced: BOOT-roos(Arabic)
Arabic form of PETER.
CADENCE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KAY-dəns
From an English word meaning "rhythm, flow". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
CADENZA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Means "conclusion of a movement in music" in Italian (literally "a falling"). A cadenza is an ornamental passage near the close of a song or solo, as in an opera. This is sometimes seen as an Italianate variant of CADENCE. The name can also be recalled from the character in the 2017 Disney movie "Beauty and the Beast" in which he is transformed into a harpsichord.
CANAAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: כְּנַעַן(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-nən(English)
Meaning unknown. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Ham. He is said to be the ancestor of the Canaanite people.
CANDRANINGSIH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Combination of Indonesian candra meaning "moon" and the given name NINGSIH.
CANGUSSU
Usage: Brazilian
The surname Cangussu has its origins in the Tupi-Guarani language and is a variation of Akangu’su, which means 'Jaguar'.
CASPIEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian)
Pronounced: KAS-pi-En(Australian English)
CASPIAN
CELESTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Dutch (Rare), English (American, Rare), Italian (Archaic), Spanish (Rare), Swedish (Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: sə-LES-tee-ah(Dutch) sə-LEST-ee-ə(American English)
Variant spelling of CAELESTIA, which is the feminine form of CAELESTIUS.

Known bearers of this name include a daughter of the American mathematician and religious leader Orson Pratt (1811-1881) and the American abolitionist and philanthropist Laura Spelman Rockefeller (1839-1915), who carried the name as a middle name and was affectionately referred to as Cettie because of it.

In popular culture, this name is best known for being the name of princess Celestia, who is a character in the animated children's television series "My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic".

CELESTIAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: sə-LES-chəl(American English) sə-LES-tee-əl(American English)
Derived from the English adjective celestial meaning "of the sky, heavenly", which is ultimately derived from the Latin adjective caelestis meaning "of the heavens" (see CAELESTIS).

The use of Celestial as a given name probably started out of religious reasons, though it is also possible that its first use was inspired by the similar (and etymologically related) given names CELESTE and CELESTIA.

CELESTIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian, Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: seh-less-tee-ELL(Australian English)
Likely an elaboration of CELESTE influenced by the word celestial.
CELESTITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: se-lay-STEE-tah(Latin American Spanish)
Means "celestite" in Spanish. Also known as celestine, celestite is a colourless, orange or blue mineral with orthorhombic crystals, so named from Latin caelestis "heavenly, pertaining to the sky" (compare CAELESTIS) after its usual pale sky-blue shade.
CHALCOMEDUSA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Mother of LAERTES. Her name, chalcos ("copper") and medousa ("guardian" or "protectress"), identifies her as the protector of Bronze Age metal-working technology.
CHAOS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), English (Rare)
Pronounced: KAY-os(Greek Mythology) KAY-ahs(English)
From the English word meaning "gaping void," ultimately from the Greek khaos "abyss, that which gapes wide open, is vast and empty." In Hesiod's 'Theogeny,' Chaos is the primeval emptiness of the Universe, who gave birth to Gaea (Mother Earth), Tartarus (embodiment of the underworld), Eros (god of love), Erebus (embodiment of silence), and Nyx (embodiment of night).
CHARLESTON
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: African American, Portuguese (Brazilian), American
Transferred use of the surname CHARLESTON.
CHESCALEIGH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Blend of FRANCHESCA and LEIGH. A notable bearer of this name is Francesca Leigh Ramsey.
CHICKA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian, Rare)
Variant of CHICK or a nickname for CHARLES.
CHIQUITA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare), African American
Pronounced: shi-KWEE-də(African American)
Means "little girl" in Spanish, from the Spanish chica "girl" combined with the diminutive suffix ita.

Chiquita Brands International Inc. is an American producer and distributor of bananas and other produce.

CHIQUITTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ShI-kE-tA
Variant of CHIQUITA.
CHRISELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Afrikaans, South African, Filipino
Presumably a variant of GRISELDA, influenced by names beginning with "Chris-", such as CHRISTINE.
CHRISMANSYAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare)
Pronounced: khrees-MAN-shah
In the case of Indonesian singer Chrismansyah "Chrisye" Rahadi (1949-2007), who was born as CHRISTIAN Rahadi, it is composed of the first part of his birth name, Chris- combined with the Indonesian suffix -syah derived from the Persian title شاه (šâh). Chrisye changed his name in 1982 when he formally converted from Christianity to Islam.
CHRISTMAS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-məs
From the name of the holiday, which means "Christ festival".
CHRISTOPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, German (Rare, Archaic), English
Pronounced: KREES-TO-FEEN(French) KRIS-to-FEE-nə(German) KRIS-tə-feen(English)
French and German feminine form of CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISZETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Afrikaans
Pronounced: Kris-et
Compound name of CHRISTINE and SUZETTE.
CHRYSALIS
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Filipino (Rare)
Pronounced: KRIS-ə-lis(English)
From the word referring to the pupa of a butterfly or moth or the cocoon where the pupa is enclosed inside, derived via Latin from Ancient Greek χρυσαλλίς (khrusallís), from χρυσός (khrusós) meaning "gold."

A My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic villain bears this name.

CHRYSOLOGOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Χρυσολόγος(Ancient Greek)
Means "word of gold", derived from Greek χρυσος (chrysos) "gold" combined with Greek λόγος (logos) "(spoken) word, speech".
CLOVER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLO-vər
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
COCO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: KO-ko(English)
Diminutive of names beginning with Co, influenced by the word cocoa. However, this was not the case for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (real name Gabrielle), whose nickname came from the name of a song she performed while working as a cabaret singer.
COETZEE
Usage: Afrikaans
Pronounced: Kort-zeer
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 15288)
COJUANGCO
Usage: Filipino
Pronounced: khaw-HWUNG-ko(Tagalog)
From Hokkien 許寰哥 (Khó͘ Hoân-ko), which was the nickname of Co Yu Hwan (許玉寰), a Chinese migrant who arrived in the Philippines in the 19th century. This is the name of a prominent political and business family in the Philippines.
CONDOLEEZZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: kawn-də-LEE-zə(English)
In the case of the former American Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice (1954-) it is derived from the Italian musical term con dolcezza meaning "with sweetness".
CONFÚCIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Portuguese form of CONFUCIUS.

A notable bearer of this name is Confúcio Moura, a Brazilian politician.

CONFUCIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CONFUCIUS.
COREANO
Usage: Filipino, Spanish, Portuguese
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 30831)
Means "Korean" in Spanish and Portuguese, possibly an ethnic name or regional name for someone from Korea or who had connections with Korea.
CREEDENCE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (American)
Variant of CREDENCE. This spelling likely influenced by the American rock band, Creedence Clearwater Revival.
CRIZELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino (Rare), South African (Rare), American (Hispanic, Rare, ?)
Variant of CHRISELDA.
DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DALLAS
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DAL-əs
From a surname that could either be of Old English origin meaning "valley house" or of Scottish Gaelic origin meaning "meadow dwelling". A city in Texas bears this name, probably in honour of American Vice President George M. Dallas (1792-1864).
DA LUA
Usage: Portuguese
Means "of the moon" in Portuguese.
DANNII
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Variant of DANNI. A notable bearer is Australian singer Dannii Minogue (1971-).
DARUSSALAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Derived from Arabic دار السلام (dar as-salam) meaning "abode of peace", used as an epithet for various places.
DASHIELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare), Filipino (Rare)
Feminine form of DASHIELL.
DATUIMAM
Usage: Filipino, Maranao
From Maranao datoʼ meaning "chieftain, leader" combined with Arabic إِمَام (ʾimām) meaning "leader". It is used as a title for religious leaders.
DAVEED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: da-VEED
Variant of DAVID.
DAYTONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: day-TON-ə, DAYT-nə?
Possibly from the name of Daytona Beach, a coastal city in northeastern Florida (U.S.), which was founded in 1870 by Mathias Day, Jr. It could also be thought of as a feminine variant of DAYTON.
DENIM
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
From the English word denim, a type of fabric, derived from the French phrase serge de Nimes, indicating that the serge (fabric) was from the town of Nîmes.
DENMARK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American), Filipino
Name borne by Denmark Vesey, freed slave.

The name Denmark comes from the state Denmark who ruled Vesey's birth place St. Thomas in the 19th century.

DE SOUSA
Usage: Portuguese
Pronounced: jee SO-zu
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 850)
Variant of DE SOUZA.
DE SOUZA
Usage: Portuguese
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 1748)
Means "of Sousa" in Portuguese, referring to the River Sousa flowing through northern Portugal. The word Sousa itself is derived from the Latin saxa, saxum meaning "stone, rock". The surname is more commonly used in Brazil and Portuguese-speaking African countries today.
DEVILLE
Usage: French
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 1006)
French surname meaning, 'The Village', from French De- 'the' and Ville- 'Village'.
DIABLO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: dee-AH-blo
Means "devil" in Spanish. Diablo Cody is the pen name of American writer Brook Busey (1978-).
DIOSCORUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of DIOSKOROS. Bearers of this name include two Coptic Popes of Alexandria (5th and 6th century AD) and the Egyptian poet Flavius Dioscorus of Aphrodito (6th century AD).
DIOSKOROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Διόσκορος(Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek Διός (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" combined with the Greek noun κόρος (koros) meaning "son, boy, lad."
DISCO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian)
Pronounced: dis-co(Australian English)
From the French word discothèque (French for "library of phonograph records", but it was subsequently used as a term for nightclubs in Paris), on the pattern of bibliothèque ‘library. Borne by Disco Norris, the son of surfer Justin Norris, of which the name was chosen by his siblings.
DISNEY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Transferred use of a surname DISNEY.
DISNEY
Usage: English
Pronounced: DIZ-nee
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 343)
Means "from Isigny", referring to the town of Isigny in Normandy. This surname was borne by the American animator and filmmaker Walt Disney (1901-1966).
DJANGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani, Popular Culture
Pronounced: JANG-go(English) Dee-jan-go(Romani, Popular Culture) de-Jang-o(Romani, Popular Culture)
Means "to awake" in Romani, the traditional language of the ethnic group commonly referred to as gypsies. It can also be interpreted as a Romani form of Jean.


Was used in a spagetti western starring the magnificent Franco Nero.

D'LLOYD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: Duh-LOID
A modern variant of LLOYD.
DORALICE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, Theatre, Italian, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Name used by the poets Boiardo and Ariosto in their Orlando poems (1495 and 1532), where it belongs to a Saracen princess. Boiardo perhaps intended it to mean "gift of the dawn" from Greek δῶρον (doron) "gift" and λύκη (lyke) "dawn", or he may have formed it from a contraction of DORA and ALICE. This name was subsequently used by the Italian writer Giovanni Francesco Straparola in his collection of fairy tales The Facetious Nights of Straparola (1550), and was also used for characters in multiple operas, including John Dryden's Marriage à la mode (1673) and Antonio Salieri's Il ricco d'un giorno (1784). More recently it was employed by the Brazilian musician Dorival Caymmi in his song Doralice, which was covered by João Gilberto in 1960. A known bearer is Brazilian footballer Doralice Santos (1963-).
DUMUZI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Sumerian Mythology
Other Scripts: 𒀭𒌉𒍣(Sumerian Cuneiform)
From Sumerian 𒌉 (dumu) meaning "son, child" and 𒍣 (zid) meaning "true, loyal". This was the name of a Sumerian god of shepherds and vegetation, the husband of Inanna. He was said to spend half of each year in the underworld, resulting in the yearly cycle of seasons. He was known to the Semitic peoples of Mesopotamia as Tammuz.
EIICHI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 影一, 営一, 叡一, 影壱, 影市, 映井智, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: E:-EE-CHEE
From Japanese 影 (ei) meaning "light" combined with 一 (ichi) meaning "one". Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.

A famous bearer is Eiichi Goto, a Japanese computer scientist, the builder of one of the first general-purpose computers in Japan.

EINHORN
Usage: German
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 72)
Derived from German Einhorn (Middle High German einhorn) "unicorn", denoting someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a unicorn.
ELAGABALUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Semitic Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of an Arabic name, derived from إله (ilah) meaning "god" and جبل (jabal) meaning "mountain". This was the name of a sun god worshipped in Emesa, in the Roman province of Syria. A 3rd-century Roman emperor, who served as a priest of this god in his youth in Syria, is known to history by the name Elagabalus. After ruling for four years he was assassinated at the age of 18, in part because he promoted the god to the head of the Roman pantheon.
ELLALUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Combination of Ella and LUNA.
ELOAH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Theology, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Other Scripts: אלוהּ(Ancient Hebrew)
A variant of ELAH or a singular form of ELOHIM, typically occurring only in poetry and prose. This unusual singular form of Elohim is used in six places for heathen deities (cf. 2 Chronicles 32:15; Daniel 11:37, 38). The normal Elohim form is also used in the plural to refer to multiple entities other than God, either for gods or images (Exodus 9:1, 12:12, 20:3; and so forth) or for one god (Exodus 32:1; Genesis 31:30, 32; and elsewhere). In the great majority of cases both are used as names of the One God of Israel.
ELVIRAWATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
From the given name ELVIRA combined with the feminine suffix -wati meaning "woman".
ENGELBRECHT
Usage: Afrikaans
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 596)
The name Engelbrecht has multiple translations, including "Angle Glorious" and "Bright Angel".
ENZO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: EHN-tso
The meaning of this name is uncertain. In some cases it seems to be an old Italian form of HEINZ, though in other cases it could be a variant of the Germanic name ANZO. In modern times it is also used as a short form of names ending in enzo, such as VINCENZO or LORENZO.
ETHIOPIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American, English
Pronounced: ee-thi-O-pi-ə(African American) e-thee-o-p-a(English)
From the name of the African country. From Greek Αιθιοπια (Aithiopia), derived from αιθω (aitho) meaning "to burn" and ωψ (ops) meaning "face", referring to the skin colour of the inhabitants.
EVACHRISTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish (Rare)
Combination of EVA and CHRISTINA. More commonly spelled with a hyphen, Eva-Christina.
FANTASHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare), English (Modern, Rare), Fijian (Rare)
Variant of FANTASIA, influenced by TASHA.
FANTASIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: fan-TAY-see-uh(American English)
Directly taken from the Italian word for "fantasy".

A known bearer is the American Idol winner Fantasia Burino.

FARAON
Usage: Filipino (Modern)
Pronounced: pha-RA-on or pa-RA-on
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 21586)
The Tagalog word for "Pharaoh".
FÉVRIER
Usage: French
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 30167)
Meaning, "February."
FITZGERALD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American, Rare), Haitian Creole
Transferred use of the surname FITZGERALD. This was the middle name of President John F. Kennedy.
FRANCESCOLI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Modern, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: fran-sehs-KO-lee(Latin American Spanish) frun-sehs-KAW-lee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Transferred use of the surname Francescoli, named in honour of former Uruguayan football player Enzo Francescoli (1961-).
FRANCHESCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Variant of FRANCESCA (Italian pronunciation with Spanish spelling rules).
FRANKENSTEIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: FRAYN-ken-STIEN
Frankenstein is the name of a monster with bolts in the area where you would put ears, and sometimes thought of as having green skin. The name originated from VICTOR Frankenstein, the protagonist in 'Frankenstein', by MARY Shelley.
FRANZ XAVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Combination of FRANZ and XAVER, in honour of Saint Francis Xavier.
FREYR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Pronounced: FRAYR(English, Icelandic)
Means "lord" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse god. He may have originally been called Yngvi, with the name Freyr being his title. Freyr presided over fertility, sunlight and rain, and was the husband of the frost giantess Gerd. With his twin sister Freya and father Njord he was one of the group of deities called the Vanir.
GAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαῖα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A(Classical Greek) GIE-ə(English) GAY-ə(English) GA-ya(Italian)
From the Greek word γαῖα (gaia), a parallel form of γῆ (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GALATEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian
Other Scripts: Γαλατεια, Γαλάτεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ga-la-TE-a; ga-la-TAY-a(Italian)
Latinized form of GALATEIA.
GALAXIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various (Modern, Rare)
Elaboration of GALAXY in the style of ALEXIA.
GALAXY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: GAL-əks-ee(American English)
From the English word galaxy, "a collection of star systems", ultimately from from Ancient Greek γαλαξίας (galaxías, "Milky Way"), from γάλα (gála, "milk").
GANONDORF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian), Japanese
Pronounced: Gah-Non-Dorf(Australian English)
A name from the Legend of Zelda Series, Mainly the last boss of the game.
GARFUNKEL
Usage: Jewish, Yiddish
Other Scripts: גאָרפֿינקל‎(Hebrew, Yiddish)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 7058)
From גאָרפֿינקל‎ (gorfinkl), "carbuncle" in Yiddish, which in turns derives from German Karfunkel. A notable bearer of this surname is Art Garfunkel.

Carbuncle is an archaic term for a number of red gemstones, usually red garnet.

GATCHALIAN
Usage: Filipino, Tagalog
Pronounced: gat-CHA-lyan(Tagalog)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 6354)
From a Hispanicised spelling of Gat Sa Li-Han, a Chinese title meaning "lord of Li-Han". It was used by the rulers of Li-Han, an ancient Philippine state that was located in the present-day city of Malolos.
GEISHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare), Spanish (Caribbean, Modern, Rare)
From the Japanese word geisha "geisha".
GENESIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JEHN-ə-sis
Means "birth, origin" in Greek. This is the name of the first book of the Old Testament in the Bible. It tells of the creation of the world, the expulsion of Adam and Eve, Noah and the great flood, and the three patriarchs.
GENTOO
Usage: Indian, Telugu, Portuguese
It is a Telugu name, most likely meaning "Gentile". It was first used by the Portuguese.
GERGES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Coptic
Coptic form of Georgios (see GEORGE).
GIANGIORGIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Combination of GIAN and GIORGIO.
GIOVANNO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Brazilian (Rare), English (Australian, Rare)
Variant form of GIOVANNI.
GIRLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Malaysian
GOETTEMS
Usage: German, Brazilian
Brazilian adaptation of the German surname Goedems; altered for easier comprehension by the Portuguese-speaking population of Brazil. All members of the Goettems family in Brazil are descendants of Johann Goedems, born in Oberlöstern, Saarland, on September 17, 1798.
GURU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian
Other Scripts: गुरु(Sanskrit)
Pronounced: goo-ṘOO:(Hindi)
Derived from Sanskrit गुरु (guru) meaning "instructor, teacher, tutor" (noun) or "grave, heavy" (adjective).
GUSTI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Balinese
From a title meaning "leader" in Balinese.
GWENOG
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Old Welsh diminutive of GWEN. This was the name of an obscure early Welsh saint. It was mentioned in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books as the name of a witch, Gwenog Jones.
GYATSO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Tibetan
Other Scripts: རྒྱ་མཚོ(Tibetan)
From Tibetan རྒྱ་མཚོ (rgya-mtsho) meaning "ocean". This is one of the given names of the current Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).
HADDAD
Usage: Arabic, Persian
Other Scripts: حداد(Arabic, Persian)
Pronounced: ha-DAD(Arabic)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 189)
Means "blacksmith, ironsmith" in Arabic, ultimately from Syriac ܚܕܕܐ (hadado).
HADJI
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Tausug, Maranao
Other Scripts: حاجي(Arabic)
Pronounced: HA-jee(Arabic)
Arabic alternate transcription of HAJI as well as the Tausug and Maranao form. It is occasionally used as a feminine name in the Philippines.
HAMENGKUBUWONO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese, Indonesian
Means "guardian of the world" in Javanese. It comes from the current ruling royal house of the Yogyakarta Sultanate in Indonesia
HANANNIHAH
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Mormon (Rare)
Pronounced: ha-nən-NIE-HAH
From the land of Hanannihah mentioned in the Book of Moses. A possibility of origin is being derived from HANNAH.
HANS-GÜNTHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Combination of HANS and GÜNTHER.
HANSJÖRG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Combination of HANS and JÖRG.
HANS-JÜRGEN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Combination of HANS and JÜRGEN.
HANSOTTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, German (Swiss)
Combination of HANS and OTTO.
HARRÝ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic form of HARRY.
HELIOGABAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian (Rare)
Croatian form of Heliogabalus.
HERACLEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare), Spanish (Mexican, Rare), Filipino (Rare), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: ῾Ηράκλεια(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of HERAKLEIA, the feminine form of HERAKLEIOS.
HERCULINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, English (American)
Feminine form of HERCULES.
HERZL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew (Rare), Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: הֵרצְל, הערצל(Hebrew, Yiddish)
Pronounced: Herəzəl(Hebrew) Hɛrtsəl(Hebrew, Yiddish)
Herzl is originally a Yiddish given name. Currently it is both given and surname for both Hebrew-speaking and Yiddish-speaking Jews. The most famous Herzl is Benyamin Ze'ev "Theodor" Herzl, a Hungarian journalist who founded Modern Zionism.
HESTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἑστία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHS-TEE-A(Classical Greek) HEHS-tee-ə(English)
Derived from Greek ἑστία (hestia) meaning "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.
HIROSHIMA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Hispanic, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
From the city in Japan derived from 広島, meaning "Broad Island" in Japanese. It is not used as a given name in Japan itself.
HLÉR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "ocean, sea". This is another name for ÆGIR.
IDUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish (Archaic), Norwegian (Archaic), Dutch, Hungarian (Rare)
Latinate form of IÐUNN.
IESHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Variant of AISHA. It was popularized by the song Iesha (1991) by Another Bad Creation [1].
ILÍTIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Portuguese form of ILITHYIA.
INDÍANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic variant of INDIANA.
INDIANAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian, Rare)
Variant of INDIANA.
INDRAWATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Indonesian form of Sanskrit इंद्रावती (Indravati), which is derived from the name of the Hindu deity INDRA combined with the Sanskrit suffix -vati meaning "woman" (see WATI).
INGRITH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English
Medieval English form of INGRÍÐR.

A character from Maleficent: Mistress of Evil has this name.

IRAWATI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: ee-ra-WA-tee
Indonesian form of IRAVATI, though it may also be considered the feminine form of IRAWAN.
IRELAND
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: IER-lənd
From the name of the European island country, derived from Irish Gaelic Éire, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
IRISH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, Filipino
Pronounced: IE-rish(English) Iry-ish(Filipino)
Means a person from Ireland or of Irish descent.
IRLANDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: eer-LAN-da(Spanish, Italian) eer-LUN-du(European Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese)
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of IRELAND.
ISIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Ἶσις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: IE-sis(English)
Greek form of Egyptian ꜣst (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), possibly from st meaning "throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.
ITYOPPYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Amharic (Rare)
Other Scripts: ኢትዮጵያ(Amharic)
Rare Amharic form of ETHIOPIA.
ÍULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Greek variation of JULIA and Ioula.
JACQSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Modern, Rare)
Variant of JACKSON (the spelling influenced by that of JACQUES).
JAHANSOUZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: جهانسوز(Persian)
Iranian form of the older Persian given name Jahansuz, which means "the burning of the world". It was derived from Persian جهان (jahân) meaning "world, universe" combined with Persian سوز (suz) meaning "burning" (ultimately from the Persian intransitive verb سوختن (sukhtan) or (suxtan) "to burn, to be burnt").
JAÏRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch, French
Dutch and French form of JAIRO. A famous bearer of this name is Dutch footballer Jaïro Riedewald.
JAJUAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: jah-WAHN
Combination of the prefix Ja- and the name Juan.
JAJUANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: jah-WAH-na
Feminine equivalent of JAJUAN
JAMAL AD-DIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: جمال الدين(Arabic)
Means "beauty of the faith (Islam)" derived from Arabic جمال (jamāl) meaning "beauty" and الدين‎‎ (al-dīn) "the religion, the faith".
JAMIROQUAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: jə-MIR-o-kwie
In the case of the band of the same name, which influenced first name usage in the 1990s and 2000s, they conceived it as a combination of jam and iroquai (the latter of the two is based on the Native American confederacy, the Iroquois).
JANAÍNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian), Tupi, Afro-American Mythology
Pronounced: zhahn-ah-EE-nah(Brazilian Portuguese)
From Tupi îandá una, referring to a type of black bird. This is also another name of the Yoruba goddess Yemaja, e.g. in the Afro-Brazilian cult of Candomblé, used as a given name in Brazil.
JANGO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Portuguese form of DJANGO.
JANNATUL FERDOUS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bengali
Other Scripts: জান্নাতুল ফেরদৌস(Bengali)
From the Arabic phrase جنّات الفردوس (jannat al-firdaws) meaning "gardens of paradise".
JARETH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: JAR-əth(English)
Probably a blend of JARED and GARETH. This was the name of the Goblin King, played by David Bowie, in the movie Labyrinth (1986).
JAYLUIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Caribbean (Rare), Spanish (Caribbean)
Pronounced: JAY-loo-is(Caribbean) JAY-luis(Caribbean Spanish)
Blend of JAY (1) and LUIS.
JAZZLYNN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of JAZLYN.
JEFFERSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHF-ər-sən
From an English surname meaning "son of JEFFREY". It is usually given in honour of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), the third president of the United States and the primary author of the Declaration of Independence.
JENAIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino
Probably a variant of either JUNAIDAH (also found spelled as Jonaida and Junaida) or ZENAIDA.
JENNICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: JEHN-i-kə
Combination of JENNIFER and JESSICA.
JERMAJESTY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: JER-maj-est-ee
A combination of the name JERMAINE and the English word majesty. Possibly inspired by the style of address "your majesty."
JERONICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Filipino (Rare)
Elaboration of JERRI, influenced by VERONICA.
JESSÉ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
French form of JESSE.
JESSICAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JES-i-kə
Variant of JESSICA.
Famous bearer: Australian swimmer Jessicah Schipper
JESSIE (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JEHS-ee
Variant of JESSE.
JÉSULA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Haitian Creole
Means "Jesus is Here" in Haitian Creole
JILCS
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Filipino (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: JEELKS
The name Jilcs is an acronym for the words Jesus Is Lord Christ Saviour (or Jesus Is Lord Christian School)

Jesus is Lord Church is an Evangelical Charismatic Christian movement in the Philippines.

JIMANDRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian)
Pronounced: JIM-An-Druh(Australian English)
A Combination of Jim and Timandra.
JIMBO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JIM-bo
Diminutive of JAMES. Perhaps it developed from JIM-boy.
JIMOTHY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: JIM-ə-thee(American English)
Combination of the names JIM and TIMOTHY.
JOHANN BAPTIST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Combination of JOHANN and BAPTIST, in honour of Saint John the Baptist.
JOHNCHRIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Filipino
Combination of JOHN and CHRIS.
JOKER
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Filipino
Probably derived from the name of the playing card.

The name is borne by the Philipine politician Joker Arroyo who has a daughter (!) with the same given name.

JONATHENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: South African, American
Pronounced: john-AFEENAH(South African) john-AFEENA(American) john-ATEENA(American)
Feminine form of JONATHAN, possibly influenced by ATHENA.
JUBILATION
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture, English (Puritan, Rare)
Pronounced: joo-bil-LAY-shun(Popular Culture)
From Old French jubilacion meaning "jubilation, rejoicing" and directly from the Latin jubilationem (nominative jubilatio, noun of action from past participle stem of jubilare, meaning "to shout or sing out joyfully."

Jubilation Lee is the name of X-Men mutant protagonist JUBILEE.

JUBILEE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Popular Culture
Other Scripts: ἰώβηλος(Greek)
Pronounced: JOO-BU-LEE(English) JOO-BI-LEE(English)
Derives from Ancient Greek ἰωβηλαῖος (iōbēlaîos, “of a jubilee”), from ἰώβηλος (iṓbēlos, “jubilee”), from Hebrew יובל (yobēl/yovēl, “ram, ram's horn; jubilee” in reference to the year of jubilee). New research indicates the term itself is proposed to have Proto-Indo-European roots. Specifically, this interpretation proposed that Latin jūbilaeus is from iūbilō (“I shout for joy”), and that this verb, as well as Middle Irish ilach (“victory cry”), English yowl, and Ancient Greek ἰύζω (iúzō, “shout”), derived from Proto-Indo-European yu- (“shout for joy”). In this interpretation, the Hebrew term is instead a borrowing from an Indo-European language, hence ultimately of Proto-Indo-European origin.

May also refer to African-American folk songs known as Jubilees.

In popular culture, Jubilee is the 'mutant' name (a contraction of JUBILATION LEE), one of the protagonists of Marvel's X-Men line of comics.

JURJUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: جرجس(Arabic)
Arabic form of GEORGE.
KAFKA
Usage: Czech
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 1392)
Derived from Czech kavka "jackdaw".
KAISER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
German form of the Roman title Caesar (see CAESAR). It is not used as a given name in Germany itself.
KAMARUZAMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Malay
Other Scripts: قمر الزمان(Malay Jawi)
Means "moon of time" from Arabic قمَر (qamar) meaning "moon" combined with زمان (zaman) meaning "time, age".
KAMARUZZAMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: قمر الزمان(Malay Jawi)
Variant of KAMARUZAMAN.
KANYE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American, Igbo, Ewe, Yoruba, Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele
From the name of the town in Botswana.

If this name is "Igbo", that would be a separate origin from the town in Botswana. The Igbo live in Nigeria, over three thousand miles from southern Botswana where Kanye is located. The ethnic group originally living in Kanye are the Ngwaketse, a subgroup of the Tswana. The Tswana speak a Bantu language, while the Igbo language is a Volta-Niger language.

Kanye also means "next in line to the chieftaincy" in Yoruba, "to give honor, tribute" in Igbo, "together" or "togetherness" in the Nguni languages (Ndebele, Xhosa, Zulu) of South Africa, and “disgust” in the Ewe language of Ghana/Togo.

KARLGUSTAV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish (Rare)
Very rare combination of KARL and GUSTAV. More commonly spelled with a hyphen, Karl-Gustav, or with a space between the names, Karl Gustav.
KASSZANDROSZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Hungarian masculine form of CASSANDRA.
KAYRO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch (Rare), English (Modern, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Pronounced: KIE-ro(Dutch)
Variant spelling of CAIRO.
KENTAVIOUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
An invented name, a combination of KENT and the suffix -avious.
KENZO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Japanese, French (Modern)
Other Scripts: 謙三, 健三, 賢三(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: KEWN-ZO(Japanese)
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 謙三 or 健三 or 賢三 (see KENZŌ). Use of the name in France can probably be attributed to the fashion brand Kenzo, founded in 1970 by the Japanese-French designer Kenzō Takada (1939-).
KÉPLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of KEPLER.
KEPLER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Means "maker of cloaks and hoods", from the traditionally German occupational surname. From the Middle High German kappe meaning 'hooded cloak'.

Rose in prominence as a first name following the rise of German mathematician, astronomer, and astrologer Johannes Kepler.

KIRKPATRICK
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Transferred use of the surname KIRKPATRICK. It is borne by author Kirkpatrick Hill.
KIRKPATRICK
Usage: English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 115)
Habitational name from various places so called from the dedication of their church to St. Patrick. See KIRK.
KLEÓPATRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic form of CLEOPATRA.
KLEOPÁTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian
Pronounced: kleh-oh-PAAT-rah
Cognate of CLEOPATRA, meaning "glory of the father".
KOBE (2)
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
From the name of the city in Japan. The parents of basketball player Kobe Bryant (1978-2020) chose this name after seeing Kobe beef (which is from the Japanese city) on a menu.
KRISTOFFERSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino, Caribbean
Transferred use of the surname KRISTOFFERSON.
KVIRINUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Faroese
Faroese form of QUIRINUS.
KWAMAINE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern)
A blend of KWAME with JERMAINE.

The name debut in 1989 was inspired by the rapper Kwamé Holland.

KYMBERLY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: KIM-bər-lee
Variant of KIMBERLY.
LACSON
Usage: Filipino
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 3947)
From Min Nan 六孫 (la̍k-sun) or 六孙 (la̍k-sun) meaning "sixth grandchild".
LARANJEIRA
Usage: Portuguese
It means "orange tree".
LAXAMANA
Usage: Filipino, Pampangan, Tagalog
Pronounced: lak-sa-MA-na(Tagalog)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 16024)
Derived from Malay laksamana meaning "admiral, officer", ultimately from Sanskrit लक्ष्मण (lakṣmaṇa).
LAXMINARAYAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism
Variant of LAKSHMINARAYAN.
LENGGOGENI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Minangkabau
Meaning unknown. This is the name of a figure in Minangkabau folklore.
LINCOLNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: lin-KOL-nee-a
Feminization of Lincoln, also a place name in Virginia, USA.
LOCKHART
Usage: Scottish, German
Pronounced: lock-heart(Scottish) luk-heart(German)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 66)
Scottish: of uncertain origin, probably from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements loc ‘lock’, ‘bolt’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. English: occupational name for a herdsman in charge of a sheep or cattlefold, from Old English loc ‘enclosure’, ‘fold’ + hierde ‘herd(er)’.
LUISMARY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean)
Pronounced: lweez-MA-ree(Spanish)
Feminine form of LUISMAR, used mostly in Venezuela.
LUQMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Malay, Urdu, Indonesian
Other Scripts: لقمان(Arabic, Malay Jawi, Urdu)
Pronounced: look-MAN(Arabic)
From the name of the 31st chapter (surah) of the Qur'an, named after a figure who is mentioned several times in Islamic scripture. The meaning of his name is not known; it has been suggested to mean "wise" (possibly in reference to his status as a wise man and sage), though it may actually have Sanskrit roots with a similar origin to the names LAKSHMANA or LAKSHMI.
LUXENBERG
Usage: German, Jewish, Luxembourgish, Belgian, French, Walloon
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 2732)
Habitational name from various places named Luxenberg, Luxemberg, Luxenburg, or Luxembourg, including the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
LÝRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Modern, Rare)
Icelandic form of LYRA.
MACCABEE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Aramaic (Anglicized), Mormon
The name of an ancient Jewish warrior, Judah Maccabee, meaning "the hammer".

His deeds are described in the deuterocanonical books 1 Maccabees to 4 Maccabees (which are considered canonical to more or less extent in some Christian denominitions).

MADEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (South, Rare), Filipino (Rare), Popular Culture
In the case of the Tyler Perry character, the name was taken from a phrase (madea or madear) used in the American south meaning "mother dear". It may also be a variant spelling of MEDEA.
MAGNETO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Magneto is the 'mutant' name of an antagonist, and sometimes protagonist, of Marvel's X-Men line of comics. His real name is Max Eisenhardt, and he's used the alias of Erik Lehnsherr many times, though he is more frequently known simply as Magneto. His mutant name is a reference to his mutant ability: magnetic manipulation. He is the father of POLARIS, Scarlet Witch, and QUICKSILVER. He is portrayed by actors Sir Ian McKellan (older Magneto) and Michael Fassbender (younger Magneto) in Fox's X-Men film series.
MAHADEWI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Indonesian form of MAHADEVI.
MAJESTY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (American, Modern)
Pronounced: Ma-jes-ty(American English)
From the Latin maiestas, meaning "greatness".
MALAKAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of MALACHI.
MARIALUISA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Modern, Rare), American (Hispanic, Modern, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Combination of MARIA and LUISA in it's full form. Its contracted form is MARISA.
MARIANGELI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean), Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic), Filipino
Pronounced: mah-ṙee-ang-KHEH-lee(Latin American Spanish)
Either a diminutive of MARIANGELICA or MARIANGELA, or else a variant of MARIANGELY. This name is more common in Latin America and the Philippines than in Spain.
MARIANGELICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian
Blend of MARIA and ANGELICA.
MARIANGELY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean), Spanish (Latin American)
Combination of MARIA and ANGELY.
MÁRIÓ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Hungarian form of MARIO.
MARIO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, German, Croatian
Pronounced: MA-ryo(Italian, Spanish, German)
Italian and Spanish form of MARIUS. Famous bearers include American racecar driver Mario Andretti (1940-) and Canadian hockey player Mario Lemieux (1965-).
MARIQUEEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino, English (American)
Pronounced: MER-ee-kween(Filipino, American English) MAR-ee-kween(Filipino, American English)
Possibly a combination of the name MARY and queen, most likely a reference to the Virgin Mary, who in Roman Catholicism is given the title "Mary, Queen of Heaven" for being the 'Queen Mother' of JESUS.

The most notable user of the name is Mariqueen Maandig Reznor (née Maandig; 1981-) a Filipino-American musician and singer-songwriter who is the frontwoman and vocalist for the band How to Destroy Angels, former member of the band West Indian Girl, and wife of Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor.

MARVELINO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare)
Pronounced: MAHR-vul-li-no(English) mar-veh-LI-no(Indonesian)
From the English word meaning "miracle" and/or "wonderful story or legend", derived from Old French merveille "a wonder", from Latin mirabilia "wonderful things", which is the neuter plural form of mirabilis "strange or wonderful, admirable, amazing", from mirari "to wonder at", from mirus "wonderful" (the word "smile" shares this root). The verb ("to marvel") is attested from c.1300.
MARXLENIN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean), Spanish (Latin American)
A revolutionary name used in Cuba formed from the surname of the German philosopher KARL MARX and from the name of the Russian revolutionist VLADIMIR LENIN.
MARYJOSEPHINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Combination of MARY and JOSEPHINE.
MAXANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Modern, Rare)
Probably a blend of any name starting with Max- (such as MAXIMILIAN) with any name ending in -ander (such as ALEXANDER).
MAXIMILIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Swedish (Modern), Portuguese, Spanish
Probably a combination of MAXIMILIAN and WILLIAM.
MAXIMILLIAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Variant of MAXIMILIAM.
MCCOOL
Usage: Scottish (Anglicized), Northern Irish (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 326)
Scottish and northern Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic MAC DHUBHGHAILL (see MCDOWELL).
Scottish and northern Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Gille Chomhghaill (Scottish), Mac Giolla Comhghaill ‘son of the servant of (Saint) COMHGHALL’, a personal name, possibly an intensive of gall ‘stranger’, borne by an early Irish saint.
Irish, possibly an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cumhaill ‘son of Cumhall’, a byname meaning ‘champion’. Fionn Mac Cumhaill is the name of a famous hero in traditional Irish literature.
MCKITTRICK
Usage: Scottish
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 840)
From Gaelic, "son of Shitrig", a personal name adapted from Old Norse Sigtryggr, literally "victory-true".
MCMANUS
Usage: Irish
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 68)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Maghnuis meaning "son of MÁGHNUS".
MEDIADORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Filipino (Rare)
Pronounced: meh-dhya-DHO-ra(Spanish) mi-dhyu-DHO-ru(European Portuguese) meh-jee-a-DO-ru(Brazilian Portuguese)
From the title of the Virgin Mary, referring to her intercessory role as a mediator in the salvific redemption by her son Jesus Christ (compare English Mediatrix, French Médiatrice and Spanish/Portuguese Mediatriz alongside Portuguese Medianeira).
MENZIES
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian)
Transferred use of the surname MENZIES.
MERLINDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian), Filipino, Caribbean
Pronounced: mur-LEEN-da(Australian English) mer-LEEN-da(Filipino, Caribbean)
Feminine form of MERLIN.
MESSIAS
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 141107)
Derived from the given name MESSIAS
METALLICA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: mə-TAL-i-kə
The name of a popular rock band, from the English word metallic. A Swedish couple gave this name to their daughter in 2007.
MICHELANGELO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mee-keh-LAN-jeh-lo(Italian) mie-kə-LAN-jə-lo(English)
Combination of MICHAEL and ANGELO, referring to the archangel Michael. The Renaissance painter and sculptor Michelangelo Buonarroti, from Florence, was the man who created such great works of art as the statue of David and the mural on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. This name was also borne by the Baroque artist Michelangelo Merisi, better known as Caravaggio.
MILADY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American), Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: mi-LAY-dee(English) mee-LAY-dhee(Spanish)
From the word, now used in historical or humorous contexts, referring to an English noblewoman or gentlewoman, the form of address to such a person or a lady. It came partly from a colloquial pronunciation of my Lady and partly from French milady (from my Lady).
MILEIDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: mee-LAY-dhee(Spanish)
Variant of MILADY.
MÍSTICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Modern, Rare), Spanish (Latin American, Modern, Rare)
Means "mystical" in Portuguese and Spanish. Occasionally used as a given name.
MITSOU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Quebec, Modern, Rare)
Apparently this is a Francophone spelling of a Japanese name, MITSU which means light and/or honey. A famous bearer is French Canadian Pop singer/actress Mitsou Gélinas.
MOEGAMMAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Afrikaans (Rare)
Form of MUHAMMAD used in Afrikaans translations of the Qur'an.
MOIRAI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Other Scripts: Μοῖραι(Greek)
MOPANTOKOBOGO
Usage: Zulu
From Zulu meaning "big man".
MOZART
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: ˈmoːˌtsaʁt(English)
Transferred use of the German surname MOZART, most likely in honour of the Austrian composer WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART.
NABI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Urdu, Bengali, Persian
Other Scripts: نبي(Arabic) نبی(Urdu, Persian) নবী(Bengali)
Pronounced: na-bee(Arabic)
Means "prophet" in Arabic.
NAHASH
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Jewish, Ancient Hebrew
Other Scripts: נָחָשׁ(Hebrew)
Pronounced: NAH-hahsh(Jewish)
Means "snake" in Hebrew, from the vocabulary noun נָחָשׁ (nachash or nāḥāš).

This name also nearly coincides with - and, without niqqudot (diacritical vowel markings), is indeed identical to - the Hebrew vocabulary noun נַחַשׁ (nachash or náḥaš) "magic, spell, enchantment".

NAJM AL-DIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: نجم الدين‎(Arabic)
Means "star of the religion" in Arabic.
NARCEDALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Mexican, Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: Nar-ceh-dah-lee-ah(Mexican Spanish)
Allegeldly a combination of NARCISSA and the DAHLIA.

It is also an anagram of CANDELARIA.

NASIRUDDIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Malay, Bengali
Other Scripts: ناصر الدين, نصیر الدین(Arabic) ناصرالدين(Malay Jawi) নাসিরউদ্দীন(Bengali)
Variant transcription of NASIR AL-DIN.
NIRWAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: neer-WAN
Derived from Indonesian nirwana meaning "heaven" or "enlightenment, liberation", ultimately from Sanskrit निर्वाण (nirvana).
NORKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Pronounced: NOR-ka(Spanish)
Seemingly derived from Russian норка (norka), referring to mink (both the animal and fur).
NORN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
OCÉAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: O-SE-AHN
French form of OKEANOS via its latinized form OCEANUS. Also compare the French noun océan meaning "ocean".
OCIREMA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
AMERICO spelled backwards.
OCTANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian (Archaic)
Combination of Latin oct- "eight" and Greek -ander "man" given to children born in October or to the eighth child of the family.
OCTAVIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Luxembourgish
Pronounced: AWK-TAH-VEE(French)
French form of OCTAVIA.
OKTYABRIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Soviet, Russian
Other Scripts: Октябрин(Russian)
Derived from Russian октябрь (oktyabr) meaning "October". This name was created by Communist parents who were eager to reject traditional names, and was used in order to commemorate the October Revolution of 1917 and the creation of the (now former) Soviet state in 1922.
ORANGE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: O-rinj
First found as a girl's name in medieval times, in the forms Orenge and Orengia. The etymology is uncertain, and may be after the place in France named Orange. This is a corruption of Arausio, the name of a Celtic water god whose name meant "temple (of the forehead)". Later it was conflated with the name of the fruit, which comes from the Sanskrit for "orange tree", naranga. The word was used to describe the fruit's colour in the 16th century.

Orange can be used as a surname, which may be derived from the medieval female name, or directly from the French place name. First used with the modern spelling in the 17th century, apparently due to William, Prince of Orange, who later became William III. His title is from the French place name.

ORANJE
Usage: Dutch
means "orange" in Dutch, in reference to the Dutch Royal Family
ORION
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὠρίων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) o-RIE-ən(English)
Meaning uncertain, but possibly related to Greek ὅριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
ÖSTERREICHER
Usage: German, German (Austrian)
Means "One from Austria", "the Austrian".
OUYANG
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 欧阳(Chinese)
Pronounced: O-YAHNG
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 7607)
From Chinese 歐 (ōu) referring to Mount Sheng in present-day Huzhou, China, combined with 陽 (yáng) meaning "southern face (of a mountain)". The name supposedly originated with a prince of the Yue state that settled in the area surrounding the mountain. This is one of the most common compound Chinese surnames.
PACIFICUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman, South African
Means "peacemaker" in Latin. From the Latin pāx 'peace' and faciō 'I do, make'.

Noted bearers are Pacificus, a disciple of St. FRANCIS of Assisi, born probably near Ascoli, Italy, in the second half of the twelfth century; St. Pacificus (PACIFICO) of San Severino (1653 – 1721), an Italian Roman Catholic Saint; and Pacificus of Verona (c.776 – 844 AD), a 9th-century Carolingian Italian religious leader, notable for his tenure as the archdeacon of Verona from 803 until his death in 844, as well as the historiographical debate over the validity of the many achievements ascribed to him.

PACQUIAO
Usage: Cebuano, Filipino
Hispanicized variant form of PAQUIAO. A famous bearer of this surname is the Filipino world champion professional boxer Manny Pacquiao (b. 1978).
PAQUIAO
Usage: Filipino (Hispanicized), Cebuano (Hispanicized)
Hispanicized form of the Cebuano surname Pakyaw (also found spelled as Pakiaw and Pakaw), which is derived from Cebuano pakyaw meaning "wholesale" or "to buy or pay in bulk".
PARASCEVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: ?
Form of PARASKEVE.
PARZIVAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Variant form of PARSIFAL.
PAULMICHAEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Combination of PAUL and MICHAEL.
PEÑAFRANCIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino
Pronounced: peh-nya-FRAN-sya(Latin American Spanish) peh-nya-FRAN-thya(European Spanish)
Taken from the Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de Peñafrancia/Nuestra Señora de la Peña de Francia and La Virgen de la Peña de Francia, meaning "The Virgin of the Rock of France" and "Our Lady of the Rock of France" respectively, venerated in Naga City though originating from the image enshrined in Salamanca, Spain.
PENNYLANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino (Rare), English
Likely given in reference to the Beatles' song PENNY LANE.
PESSACH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish
Pronounced: peh-sahkh
Name of a holiday, the original Jewish version of Passover. It is commonly given to babies born on, or close to Pessach.

The verb "pasàch" (Hebrew: פָּסַח) is first mentioned in the Torah account of the Exodus from Egypt (Exodus 12:23), and there is some debate about its exact meaning: the commonly-held assumption that it means "he passed over", in reference to God "passing over" the houses of the Israelites during the final plague of the Ten Plagues of Egypt, stems from the translation provided in the Septuagint (παρελευσεται in Exodus 12:23, and εσκεπασεν in Exodus 12:27). Judging from other instances of the verb, and instances of parallelism, a more faithful translation may be "he hovered over, guarding."

PESSEGUEIRO
Usage: Portuguese
Means "peach tree" in Portuguese, ultimately from Latin persicum. It indicated a person who lived near or worked with peach trees.
PETRICHOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Canadian)
The earthy scent produced when rain falls on dry soil. The word is constructed from Greek petra (πέτρα), meaning "stone", and īchōr (ἰχώρ), the fluid that flows in the veins of the gods in Greek mythology.

It was used as a given name for a girl in the Canadian province Alberta in 2016.

PHÈDRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Quebec)
French form of PHAEDRA.
PHILLIPPA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British, Rare), English (Australian, Rare)
Feminine form of PHILLIP.
PILIANG
Usage: Minangkabau
Probably derived from Indonesian pili meaning "a lot, many" and hyang meaning "god, deity" or the phrase pili hyang meaning "the god, the deity" (most likely referring to the Hindu-influenced gods that were worshiped before the arrival of Islam in the Indonesian archipelago). This is the name of a Minangkabau suku (tribe).
PINKI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian
Feminine form of PINKY or variant of PINKIE.
PINKIE
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PING-kee
Diminutive of PINK. Borne by a character of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic.
PITALOKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sundanese
Pronounced: pitaloka
the name of a sundanese princess in the past
POLYHYMNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Πολυύμνια(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of POLYMNIA.
POLYMNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πολύμνια, Πολυύμνια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PO-LUYM-NEE-A(Classical Greek)
Means "abounding in song", derived from Greek πολύς (polys) meaning "much" and ὕμνος (hymnos) meaning "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.
POTIPHAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English (African, Rare)
Other Scripts: פּוֹטִיפַר(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: PAHT-ə-fər(Biblical English)
From Egyptian p-di-p-r' meaning "he whom Ra gave", composed of the definite article p- "the one" combined with di "whom he gave" and r', the name of the supreme god RA. In the Old Testament, Potiphar is a wealthy Egyptian who purchases Joseph as a slave.
PRIMROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PRIM-roz
From the English word for the flower, ultimately deriving from Latin prima rosa "first rose".
PRINCEWILL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Transferred use of surname PRINCEWILL
PROPHET
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
From the English word prophet, ultimately from Ancient Greek προφήτης prophḗtēs "one who speaks for a god".
PUTROË
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Acehnese
Means "daughter" in Acehnese.
QAMARJAMOL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Uzbek
Derived from Uzbek qamar meaning "moon" and jamol meaning "beauty".
QIRIN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
A chimerical creature from East Asian mythology (Chinese/pinyin: qílín, Japanese kirin).
QUARESMA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Means "Lent", the liturgical time, in Portuguese.
QUEEN
Usage: English
Pronounced: KWEEN
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 98)
From a given name that was derived from Old English cwen meaning "queen, woman". In some occurrences it may have been a nickname.
QUETZALA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Mexican, Rare)
QUETZALXOCHITL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Nahuatl
Means "feather flower" or "precious flower" in Nahuatl, from Nahuatl quetzalli "feather" or "precious" and xochitl "flower".
QUIAMBAO
Usage: Filipino
Pronounced: kyam-BOW(Tagalog) KYUM-bow(Tagalog)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 6358)
Possibly from Hokkien 欠賺 (khiàm-báu) meaning "owed money, lacking money" or 鹹賺 (kiâm-báu) meaning "stingy with money".
QUICKSILVER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Quicksilver is the 'mutant' name of a protagonist, and sometimes antagonist, of Marvel's line of X-Men and Avengers comics. His real name is Pietro Maximoff, and he is the son of MAGNETO. His mutant name is a reference to his ability of moving and thinking at superhuman speeds, and the fact he is typically depicted with silver hair. He is portrayed by actors Evan Peters in Fox's X-Men film series, and Aaron Taylor-Johnson in Disney's The Avengers film series.

This is also the super-hero name of DC comics protagonist Max Mercury, who is also capable of super-human speed. He is sometimes known as MERCURY.

QUIETA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian (Rare), Romanian (Rare), English (Rare), German (Swiss, Rare), Caribbean (Rare)
Derived from Latin quietus, -a, -um "quiet". This was the name of a saint.
QUILLIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (South, Rare)
QUINTILIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Italian (Archaic), Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Feminine form of Quintilianus (see QUINTILIAN).
QUIRINUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Late Roman
Pronounced: kwee-REE-noos(Latin) kwi-RIE-nəs(English)
Possibly derived from the Sabine word quiris meaning "spear". Quirinus was a Sabine and Roman god, sometimes identified with Romulus. He declined in importance after the early Republican era. The name was also borne by several early saints.
RACQUEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: rə-KEHL
Variant of RAQUEL.
RACQUELLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: RA-kell
Variant of RACQUEL.
RAIFÉAL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Irish form of RAPHAEL
RAMADHANI
Usage: Eastern African, Swahili
From the given name RAMADAN.
RAMANATHAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Tamil, Malayalam
Other Scripts: இராமநாதன்(Tamil) രാമനാഥൻ(Malayalam)
Means "protector of Rama", derived from Sanskrit नाथ (nāthá) meaning "protector, possessor, owner" combined with the name of the Hindu god RAMA (1).
RARITY
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Popular Culture
Pronounced: RER-i-tee(English)
From the English word, rarity, "a thing that is rare, especially one having particular value as a result". A My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic character bears this name.
RASUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Avar
Other Scripts: رسول(Arabic) Расул(Avar)
Pronounced: ra-SOOL(Arabic)
Means "prophet, messenger" in Arabic.
RATNACANDRA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Combination of RATNA and CANDRA, derived from रत्नचन्द्र (rathnachandra), "jewel of the moon" or "shining treasure" in Sanskrit.
RATNASARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: rat-na-SA-ree
From Indonesian ratna meaning "jewel" and sari meaning "essence".
REXY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian, Filipino
Diminutive of REX.
RIDGECIANO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Dutch (Surinamese, Rare)
Combination of RIDGE with a given name that ends in -ciano, such as LUCIANO and MARCIANO.

A notable bearer of this name is the Dutch professional soccer player Ridgeciano Haps (b. 1993), who is of Surinamese descent.

RIZAL
Usage: Filipino, Tagalog, Cebuano
Pronounced: ree-SAL(Spanish) ree-ZAL(Tagalog)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 53417)
From Spanish ricial meaning "green field" or "rice field". A notable bearer was José Rizal (1861-1896), a Filipino nationalist and national hero.
RIZALDY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino
Pronounced: ri-ZAL-dee
Variant of Rizal Day, the Philippine national holiday (held on December 30th) commemorating the life and works of national hero José Rizal.
This name is mainly given to children born on or around that holiday or Rizal's birth (June 19th).
ROBINHOOD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino
Combination of ROBIN and HOOD. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. A notable bearer of this name is Robinhood Ferdinand "Robin" Cariño Padilla, a Filipino movie actor and director.
ROMÊNIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Either a variant of ROMÂNIA or directly derived from Romênia, the Brazilian Portuguese name for the European country of Romania.
ROXXANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino, English (American)
Pronounced: rok-SAHN(Filipino) rahk-SAN(American English)
Variant of ROXANNE.
RUFIO
Usage: Spanish (Mexican)
SAIF AL-ISLAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Arabic (Rare)
Other Scripts: سيف الإسلام(Arabic)
Means "sword of Islam", derived from Arabic سَيْف (sayf) meaning "sword, sabre" combined with الْإِسْلَام (al-ʾislām) "Islam". A known bearer is Saif al-Islam Gaddafi (1972-), who is a son of former Libyan revolutionary Muammar Gaddafi (1942-2011).
SALIBA
Usage: Arabic, Maltese
Other Scripts: صليب(Arabic)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 1486)
Means "crucifix, cross" in Arabic, a reference to the crucifixion of JESUS CHRIST in Christianity. The Saliba are a predominantly Christian family based in Lebanon, the Levant, and Malta.
SAMANTHA
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Sinhalese
Variant of SAMAN.
SANTANA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Spanish, Popular Culture
Pronounced: SAN-tan-ah
From the traditionally Spanish habitation surname derived from any of the numerous places named Santa ANA.

Its usage may be due to popular Mexican-American musician Carlos Santana, founder of the Latin rock band Santana. On the Fox television show 'Glee', one of the protagonists is named Santana Lopez, portrayed by actress Naya Rivera.

SARIPADA
Usage: Filipino, Maranao
Means "chief" in Maranao, ultimately from Sanskrit श्रीपाद (śrī́pā́da) meaning "holy foot" (see SALIPADA).
SASKIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German
Pronounced: SAHS-kee-a:(Dutch) ZAS-kya(German)
From the Germanic element sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SCARLETROSE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Combination of SCARLET and ROSE.
SCHWERTFUEHRER
Usage: German (Austrian)
Pronounced: Sh-vairt-fyer-er(Austrian German)
Sword leader; military general or other leadership position
SENDAYDIEGO
Usage: Filipino
Pronounced: sehn-die-DYE-go
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 145200)
Possibly from Japanese 仙台 (Sendai), the name of a city in Japan, combined with the given name DIEGO.
SEPHIROTH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: סְפִירוֹת(Hebrew)
Pronounced: Seh-FI-roth
Sephiroth is named for the סְפִירוֹת Səphīrōth (medieval Hebrew form of Sephirot). Sephiroth is a plural noun in Hebrew; the singular is Sephirah (also spelled Sefira). The Sephiroth are described in the Kabbalah as the manifestations of God that allow Him to manifest in the physical and metaphysical universes.
SEQUOIA
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sə-KWOI-ə
From the name of huge trees that grow in California. The tree got its name from the 19th-century Cherokee scholar Sequoyah (also known as George Guess), the inventor of the Cherokee writing system.
SERAPHIM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Greek, English (Puritan)
Other Scripts: שׂרף(Hebrew)
Pronounced: SER-ə-fim(English)
Directly from the biblical word seraphim which meant "fiery ones" from Hebrew and referred to an order of angels described in the Book of Isaiah (see SERAPHINA). A famous bearer of the name was Saint Seraphim of Sarov, a 19th-century Russian mystic, in whose case his name was an anglicization of his actual name SERAFIM.
SHAH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: شاهنشاه(Persian)
Persian term for a monarch. The most famous bearer of this name was Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the last Shah of Iran.
SHANIQUA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
Pronounced: shə-NEE-kwə(English)
Combination of the popular name elements Shan and qua.
SHEM-TOV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish
Pronounced: shehm-tohv
Hebrew for "(having a) good name", meaning famous for a good reputation.
SHIVSHAKTI
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indian
Other Scripts: शिवशक्ति(Hindi)
Means "auspicious power" in Sanskrit. A notable bearer of this name is Shivshakti Sachdev, an Indian TV actress.
SIMPSON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SIMP-son
Transferred use of the surname SIMPSON.
SIOBHAN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Anglicised form of SIOBHÁN.
SIOUXSIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: SOO-zee(British English)
Variant of SUSIE.
SIWA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Dutch
SLEIPNIR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse sleipr "slippery" (in relation to "bog, marsh"). In Norse mythology, Loki's son Sleipnir was Odin's eight-legged horse.
SNAPE
Usage: English (British), Scottish
Pronounced: SNAYP(British English, Scottish)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 2485)
An old, now rare surname, with various origins in Suffolk and Yorkshire in England and Lanarkshire in Scotland. This is also the name of Severus Snape, a character from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter book series.
SOLEIL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: SAW-LAY(French)
Means "sun" in French. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.
SOLLEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian, Rare)
Pronounced: So lay(Australian English)
Variant of SOLEIL.
STARGAZER
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
From the English word stargazer "one who stargazes" or "a daydreamer".
STARGIRL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern), Popular Culture, Literature
Pronounced: star-gurl(English)
Stargirl is the superhero name of DC comics superheroine, Courtney Elizabeth Whitmore. 'Stargirl' is also the title of American author Jerry Spinelli's young adult novel published in 2000, the title referring to the main character, Susan "Stargirl" Caraway.
STUBBS
Usage: German
Pronounced: ŚȚŮBBS
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 59)
SUKANTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bengali, Javanese
Other Scripts: সুকান্ত(Bengali)
Pronounced: soo-KAN-to(Indonesian)
Bengali alternate transcription of SUKANTA as well as the Javanese form.
SUNSET
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
From the English word "sunset" referring to the setting of the sun at the end of the day.
SUPARMAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦱꦸꦥꦂꦩꦤ꧀(Javanese)
Pronounced: soo-PAR-man(Indonesian)
From the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with परम (parama) meaning "absolute, ultimate".
SURYANINGSIH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Derived from Indonesian surya meaning "sun" (of Sanskrit origin) combined with the given name NINGSIH.
SYAFII
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: sha-fee-EE
Derived from Arabic شَافِعِيّ (šāfiʿiyy) referring the Shafi'i (or Shafei) school (madhhab) of Sunni Islam. The sect was named in honour of its founder, an Arab scholar named Abu Abdullah Muhammad ibn Idris al-Shafi'i.
SYAHNAZ
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: شهناز(Malay Jawi)
Indonesian and Malay form of SHAHNAZ.
SYLVANDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Combination of SYLVESTER and ANDERS
TAFARI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Eastern African (Rare), Amharic (Rare)
Other Scripts: ተፈሪ(Amharic)
Possibly means "he who inspires awe" in Amharic. This name was borne by Lij Tafari Makonnen (1892-1975), also known as Haile Selassie, the last emperor of Ethiopia. Rastafarians (Ras Tafari meaning "king Tafari") revere him as the earthly incarnation of God.
TALLULAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: tə-LOO-lə
Popularly claimed to mean "leaping waters" in the Choctaw language, it may actually mean "town" in the Creek language. This is the name of waterfalls in Georgia. It was borne by American actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968), who was named after her grandmother, who may have been named after the waterfalls.
TALULLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
From the Gaelic name Tuilelaith, which was derived from Irish tuile "abundance" and flaith "princess".
TAMMUZ
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, Semitic Mythology
Other Scripts: תַּמּוּז(Ancient Hebrew)
Semitic form of DUMUZI. The name of the god appears in the Book of Ezekiel in the Old Testament.
TANITHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch (Rare), English (Rare), Afrikaans (Rare)
Pronounced: tah-NEE-tah(Dutch)
Variant of TANITH.
TANIUSCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean, Rare), Central American (Rare)
Pronounced: ta-NYOOS-ka(Spanish)
Variant of TANIUSKA.
TANIUSKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean), Central American
Pronounced: ta-NYOOS-ka(Spanish)
Form of TANYUSHKA (compare Katiuska). It is mostly used in Venezuela and Nicaragua.
TANNENBAUM
Usage: Jewish, German
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 794)
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) topographic name or Jewish ornamental name from German Tannenbaum ‘fir tree’, ‘pine tree’.
TATLONGHARI
Usage: Filipino, Tagalog
Pronounced: tat-long-HA-ree(Tagalog)
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 29664)
From Tagalog Tatlong Hari literally meaning "three kings", referring to the biblical Magi or the Epiphany (the appearance of Jesus to the Magi).
TAVIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare)
Short form of OCTAVIUS.
TAWADROS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Coptic (Arabized)
Other Scripts: تواضروس(Arabic)
Coptic form of THEODORE.
TEMBANG
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare)
Pronounced: TəMBUNG
Means "song" in Javanese.
TETRA
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare), English
From the Greek prefix tetra- meaning, “four.”
THANOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Θάνος(Greek)
Diminutive of ATHANASIOS.
THELONIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various
Latinized form of Tielo (see TILO). A famous bearer was jazz musician Thelonious Monk (1917-1982).
THORBURN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: THAWR-bərn
From a Scottish and English surname that was derived from the Norse name Þórbjǫrn (see TORBJÖRN).
THORMOT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Manx
Manx form of Scottish TORMOD.
TODRUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish
Yiddish form of THEODORE. This name was originally used to translate NATHAN and JONATHAN.
TONATIUH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Nahuatl, Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Pronounced: To-na-TEW(Nahuatl)
Means "sun" in Nahuatl. This is the name of the Aztec sun god.
TORCUIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Scottish form of Þórketill (see TORKEL).
TORQUIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish
Anglicized form of TORCUIL.
TRÚMANN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic (Modern, Rare)
Icelandic form of TRUMAN.
TSARIHANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Pronounced: zär-ree-AN-nah
Tsarihanna is of African American origins and means "Beautiful/Favored/Graceful Empress/Queen". Tsari is shorten from the Russian and Bulgarian words Tsarina and Tsaritsa, both meaning "Empress." The name Hannah is of Hebrew origin. The meaning of Hannah is "favor or grace" and is urbanely synonymous to "beautiful."
TSUKIYOMI
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 月読(Japanese Kanji)
Tsuki (moon; month) Yomi (bow) Tsukiyo (moonlit night). In Japan it is considered the Moon God
TWYLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TWIE-lə
Variant of TWILA.
USMAIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean)
Commonly used by Cubans and Cuban-American immigrants, this name is inspired by the U.S. Mail service.
VALCHIRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Italian cognate of VALKYRIE. (Cf. VALQUÍRIA.)
VALDINEI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Anglicized, Rare)
Pronounced: val-dee-NEI(Brazilian Portuguese)
Originally Waltdisney, a homenage to WALT DISNEY (WALTER ELIAS DISNEY).
VALKYRIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: VAL-ki-ree(English)
Means "chooser of the slain", derived from Old Norse valr "the slain" and kyrja "chooser". In Norse myth the Valkyries were maidens who led heroes killed in battle to Valhalla.
VALKYRJA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse valkyrja meaning "chooser of the slain" (see VALKYRIE).
VALQUÍRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese
Portuguese form of VALKYRIE.
VALQUIRIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: val-KEE-ṙya
Spanish form of VALKYRIE.
VALTÝR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Combination of Old Norse valr "the slain (in Valhalla)" and tívar "gods".
VANDERLEI
Usage: Brazilian
It derives from the Dutch surname Van der Leij/Ley. The surname arrived in Brazil by Kaspar Nieuwhoff Van Der Leij by 1630, a cavalry captain from the Dutch army.
VASILICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Feminine form of VASILE.
VILLASENOR
Usage: Spanish
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 666)
Habitational name, apparently a Castilianized spelling of Galician Vilseñor, from any of three places in Lugo province named Vilaseñor.
VIRGINÍA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic form of VIRGINIA.
VLAD
Usage: Romanian
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 13173)
Derived from the given name VLAD.
VOLKAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Turkish
Means "volcano" in Turkish.
VOLTAIRE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, Popular Culture
Pen name of François Marie Arouet. 1694-1778.
French philosopher and writer whose works epitomize the Age of Enlightenment, often attacking injustice and intolerance. He wrote Candide (1759) and the Philosophical Dictionary (1764).
VOORHEES
Usage: Dutch
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 377)
Habitational name from a place in Drenthe called Voorhees.
WANDERLEY
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian)
Pronounced: VAHN-dərr-lay(Brazilian Portuguese)
Variant of VANDERLEY.
WEINGARTNER
Usage: German
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (down 916)
Derived from German weingärtner meaning "wine maker, vintner", which itself is derived from German weingarten meaning "vineyard". The latter is a composite word consisting of German wein "wine" combined with German garten "garden". A known bearer of this surname was Felix Weingartner (1863-1942), an Austrian conductor, composer and pianist.
WEISZ
Usage: Jewish
Popularity: the United States: no ranking (up 912)
Hungarian spelling of WEISS.
WIDIYANTO
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦮꦶꦢꦶꦪꦤ꧀ꦠꦺꦴ(Javanese)
Pronounced: wee-dee-YAN-to(Indonesian)
From Javanese widya meaning "knowledge, wisdom", ultimately from Sanskrit विद्या (vidya).
WILHELMINAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: South African (Rare), English (Rare)
Variant of WILHELMINA.
WISCONSIN
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: American
Pronounced: Wis-cohn-sihn
Unisex name based of the American state.
WOUTERSZ
Usage: English (Australian)
Variant of WOUTERS
WULANDARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦮꦸꦭꦤ꧀ꦢꦫꦶ(Javanese)
Pronounced: woo-lan-DA-ree(Indonesian)
Derived from Javanese wulan meaning "moon".
WYLDSTYLE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Wyldstyle is the female protagonist in "The LEGO movie". The name is derived from "wild style" with literal meaning.
WYSZENIEGA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish
Derived from the Slavic name elements wysze "higher" and niega "delight".
XANATOS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture, Greek
Pronounced: Zan-ə-Tohs(Popular Culture)
Variant of THANATOS.
XAVERIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian, Dutch
Pronounced: ksah:-VI:-rhee-us(Dutch)
Latinized form of XAVIER.
XENOPHILIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: ZEE-no-fill-ee-us
Variant form of XENOPHILUS. This particular form seems to not ever have been borne by someone in real life, so this is best suited for the Literature category, as the name has been used by British author J.K. Rowling in her "Harry Potter" books, which feature a character named Xenophilius Lovegood.
XENOPHILUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of XENOPHILOS. This was the name of a Pythagorean philosopher and musician, who lived in the first half of the 4th century BC.
XERAZADE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Portuguese form of SHEHERAZADE.
XIOMARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: syo-MA-ra
Possibly a Spanish form of GUIOMAR.
XIUHXOCHITL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Nahuatl
Means "turquoise flower" in Nahuatl, from Nahuatl xiuhuitl, "turquoise" and xochitl, "flower".
XYNTHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: KSUYN-tee-ah
Modern variant of CYNTHIA.

Xynthia is the name of a notable cyclone in 2010 in Western Europe.

YGGDRASIL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Possibly means "ODIN's gallows", referring to how Odin hanged himself from it to gain knowledge of the runes. In Norse mythology this is the name of the mythical tree that connects the Realms.
YOGI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: Yo-gee
Famous bearer is "Yogi" Berra. He was given the nickname Yogi by a childhood friend who thought that he looked like an Indian Yogi he had seen in a movie.
YOGI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Indonesian
Other Scripts: योगी(Hindi)
Pronounced: YO-gee(Indonesian)
Denotes a practitioner of yoga (a set of Hindu and Buddhist disciplines centred around spiritual insight and tranquility), ultimately from Sanskrit युनक्ति (yunákti) meaning "to connect, to join".
YOGIE
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: YO-gee
Variant of YOGI.
YOM-TOV
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Jewish
Other Scripts: יוֹם־טוֹב(Hebrew)
Pronounced: yohm-tohv
Means "good day, holiday" in Hebrew. It is often given to babies born on a holiday.
YORELVIS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
An elaboration of ELVIS.
YOUNGHUSBAND
Usage: English
YUDELKIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean)
YUMILEIDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
Pronounced: jyoo-mee-LAY-dhee(Spanish) yoo-mee-LAY-dhee(Spanish)
From English You MILADY.

One bearer of a variant of this name is Cuban shot putter Yumileidi (Yumisleidis) Cumbá (1975-).

YUNISLEIDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
Combination of YUNI and LEIDY.
YURISLEIDY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
Combination of Yuris and LEIDY.
YVONNI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek (Rare)
Other Scripts: Υβόννη(Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VO-nee
Greek form of YVONNE.
ZAGREU
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Catalan, Portuguese
Catalan and Portuguese form of ZAGREUS.
ZAGREUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ζαγρεύς(Ancient Greek)
Possibly derived from Greek ζαγρεύς (zagreus), which was a term used to refer to a hunter that catches live animals. The term would technically mean "great hunter", as it was derived from the Greek prefix ζα (za) meaning "very" combined with Greek αγρεύς (agreus) meaning "hunter". Another possibility for the name Zagreus could be that it was derived from Greek ζάγρη (zagre) meaning "barefoot". In Greek mythology, Zagreus was an obscure deity who was apparently identified with the god DIONYSUS.
ZAMZAM
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Arabic, Somali, Indonesian
Other Scripts: زمزم(Arabic)
Pronounced: zam-zam(Arabic)
From the name of a well located in Mecca probably meaning "abundant water" or "stop flowing" in Arabic. According to Islamic tradition, the well was created by ALLAH for HAJAR and her son ISMAIL while they were lost in the desert in search of water.
It is used as a masculine name in Indonesia but is feminine elsewhere.
ZARAHEMLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mormon
Pronounced: ZAYR-ə-him-lə
According to The Book of Mormon, Zarahemla was a city in ancient America, named after a man who was an ancestor of the prophet AMMON and a descendant of MULEK. In modern times, Zarahemla is most commonly used as a feminine name among Spanish-speaking and Filipino Mormons.
ZENDAYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American, Shona
Pronounced: zehn-DAY-ə(African American)
Variant of TENDAI. A famous bearer is Zendaya Coleman (1996-) (mononymously known as Zendaya) an American actress, singer, and dancer.
ZERUBBABEL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English (Puritan)
Other Scripts: זְרֻבָּבֶל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: zeh-ru-BAH-bel(Biblical English)
Possibly means "conceived and born in Babylon" from a contraction of either Assyrian-Babylonian Zəru Bābel "seed of Babylon" or Hebrew זְרוּעַ בָּבֶל (Zərua‘ Bāvel) "the one sown of Babylon". In the Old Testament he led the first group of Jews out of captivity in Babylon in the first year of the Persian king Cyrus.
ZUL
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Malay, Indonesian
Other Scripts: ذول(Malay Jawi)
Derived from Arabic ذُو (ḏū) meaning "possessor (of), owner (of)". It it typically used as the first element of compound names such as ZULKIFLI, ZULFIQAR, or ZULKARNAIN.
ZURISADAI
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Pronounced: thoo-ree-sa-DHIE(European Spanish) soo-ree-sa-DHIE(Latin American Spanish) zoo-ree-su-DHIE(European Portuguese) zoo-ree-sa-DIE(Brazilian Portuguese)
Spanish and Portuguese form of ZURISHADDAI. It is unisex, though predominantly feminine, in Latin America.
ZURISHADDAI
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical Hebrew, Biblical
Other Scripts: צוּרְישַׁדָּי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ͭuw-REE-sha-DIE(Biblical Hebrew, Biblical English)
Means "rock of the Almighty", Shaddai being another name of God. In the Old Testament, he was the father of Shelumiel, the Prince of the Tribe of Simeon.
ZYNTHIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, American (Rare), Spanish (Mexican, Rare)
Pronounced: TSUYN-tee-a(German) ZIN-thee-ə(American)
Germanised spelling of CYNTHIA.

As a given name mostly used in the Americas.

ZYRUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino
Probably a variant of CYRUS.
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