jfifles's Personal Name List

Aberycusgentylis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Obscure
Aberycusgentylis Balthropp, baptized 25 January 1648 in Iver, Buckinghamshire, England, was named in honour of the Italian-born Oxford professor and jurist Alberico Gentili (1552-1608) via the Latinized form of his name: Albericus Gentilis.
Abrahamina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish (Rare)
Feminine form of Abraham.
Abrahamine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian (Rare)
Variant of Abrahamina.
Achishalom
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hebrew (Modern, Rare)
Other Scripts: אחישלום, אחי-שלום(Hebrew)
Pronounced: Ah-hee-shah-lohm, ah-khee-shah-LOM
Combination of the names Achi and Shalom, meaning "my brother is a peace" or "my brother will bring peace" in Hebrew.
Adityawarman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History, Indonesian (Rare)
Derived from Sanskrit आदित्यवर्मन् (adityavarman) meaning "protection of Aditya" or "protection of the sun", from the name of the Hindu god Aditya combined with Sanskrit वर्मन् (varman) meaning "armour, protection, shield". This was the name of a 14th-century Sumatran king who founded the Pagaruyung Kingdom.
Adolfia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Jamaican Patois (Rare), Malagasy (Rare)
Feminine form of Adolf.
Adonai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Theology
Other Scripts: אֲדֹנָי(Ancient Hebrew)
Means "my lord" in Hebrew. This was the title used to refer to the God of the Israelites, Yahweh, whose name was forbidden to be spoken.
Aegyptus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αἴγυπτος(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of the Greek Aigyptos (Αἴγυπτος), derived from Amarna Hikuptah, which corresponds to Egyptian Ha(t)-ka-ptah "temple of the soul of Ptah". Historically one of the names of Memphis, it was taken by the Greeks to be the name of the whole country.

In Greek myth Aegyptus, a descendent of Io and Neilus, was the twin and enemy of Danaus, king of Argos. Aegyptus had 50 sons who all but one were slain by forty-nine of the fifty daughters of Danaus (the exceptions being Lynceus and Hypermnestra who married instead). He is said to have fled to Egypt, where he ruled as the eponym king.

Æsir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Icelandic masculine form of Æsa. This is the name of a character in Norse mythology.
Ahuitzotl
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Aztec
From āhuitzōtl, "otter" in Nahuatl.

Borne by a ruler of the Aztecs from 1468 to 1502.

Albania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: al-BAY-nee-ə
From the name of the country in the Balkans, as well as various other places, perhaps ultimately from a pre-Indo-European word *alb meaning "hill" or from the Indo-European root *alb "white" (see Albus).

It can also be used as an elaboration of Alba (the Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland) or a feminine form of Alban.

Alemania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American, American (Hispanic)
Alemania is an alternate Latin name for Germany (and the Spanish name of the country).

The name is not used in Germany itself and will probably be questioned by the registrar because some popular football clubs bear this name, e.g. Alemannia Aachen.

Alpha
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-fə
From the name of the first letter in the Greek alphabet, Α.
Ambarwati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: am-bar-WA-tee
From Indonesian ambar meaning "amber", ultimately from Arabic عنبر ('anbar), or Sanskrit अम्बर (ambara) meaning "garment, sky" combined with the feminine suffix -wati.
Anat 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology
Possibly derived from a Semitic root meaning "water spring". Anat was a goddess of fertility, hunting and war worshipped by the Semitic peoples of the Levant. She was the sister and consort of the god Hadad.
Anawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: a-na-WA-tee
Combination of the name Ana and the feminine suffix -wati.
Anggara
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦲꦁꦒꦫ(Javanese)
Pronounced: ang-GA-ra(Indonesian)
Means "Tuesday" in Javanese, ultimately from Sanskrit अङ्गार (angara).
Artemon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀρτέμων(Ancient Greek)
From an ancient Greek name that was derived from the name of the Greek goddess Artemis.
Asenaca
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Fijian
Fijian form of Asenath.
Atréju
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Created by German author Michael Ende for the hero of his fantasy novel 'Die unendliche Geschichte' (1979; English: 'The Neverending Story'). The character is a boy warrior whose name is explained as meaning "son of all" in his fictional native language, given to him because he was raised by all of the members of his village after being orphaned as a newborn.
Atreyu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature (Anglicized)
Pronounced: ə-TRAY-oo
Anglicized variant of Atréju, which was created by German author Michael Ende for the hero of his fantasy novel 'Die unendliche Geschichte' (1979; English: 'The Neverending Story'). The character is a boy warrior whose name is explained as meaning "son of all" in his fictional native language, given to him because he was raised by all of the members of his village after being orphaned as a newborn.

Current usage is influenced by the name of a Californian metal-core band named after the hero in 'The neverending story'.

Austria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare), Filipino (Rare), Spanish (Latin American, Rare)
From the name of the European country.
Avamira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Combination of Ava and Mira.
Avigalina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean)
Pronounced: ah-bee-gah-LEE-nah(Caribbean Spanish)
Elaborated form of Avigail.
Aztlan
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Nahuatl (?), American (Hispanic, Rare), Mexican (Rare)
Pronounced: As-tl-an(Nahuatl)
Aztlan is the mythical homeland of the Aztec peoples. In their language (Nahuatl), the roots of Aztlan are the two words: aztatl tlan(tli) meaning "heron" and "place of". The homeland was said to have many heron birds and may have been translated to 'place of white-ness' or even 'brightness' (as used by some Chicanos) because of the large population of the white feathered birds living there. No one knows for sure where this land was exactly. Many Chicanos have said the whole Southwest portion of the United states or the areas that use to be considered Mexico's territory is in fact Aztlan during the times of the Chicano movement.
Azul
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Filipino, Apache
Pronounced: a-THOOL(European Spanish) a-SOOL(Latin American Spanish) u-ZOOL(European Portuguese) a-ZOO(Brazilian Portuguese)
From Spanish and Portuguese azul meaning "blue."

A famous bearer was Azul, the ninth and last wife of Geronimo (Apache leader) married in 1907 who was close to her husband until his death in 1909 at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Badr-un-nissa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: بدرالنساء بیگم(Persian)
The name of a Mughal princess meaning "full moon amongst women".
Beethoven
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: Beethoven
Transferred use of the surname Beethoven.
Bethlehem
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend, English (American, Rare), Biblical, Ethiopian (Rare), English (British)
Pronounced: beth-LEH-hem(Judeo-Christian Legend, Biblical English) BETH-le-hem(American English)
From the two Hebrew words bayta "house" and lachem "bread". Bethlehem is the name of a Palestinian city. In the Bible, it is the place where Jesus was born.
Bintanath
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Means "daughter of Anat" in Egyptian.

She was the daughter of Ramses II and Isetnofret, later becoming a Great Royal Wife of her father following the death of Nefertari.

Bjarndís
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic
Combination of the Old Norse name elements bjǫrn "bear" and dís "goddess; woman, lady; sister" or dis "wise woman, seeress; woman, virgin".
Blancanieves
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Means "Snow White" in Spanish.
Bolivia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Hispanic, Rare)
From the name of the country in South America. The country got its name from the surname Bolívar, in honour of the revolutionary Simón Bolívar.
Brhiannon
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Australian, Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: bree-AN-ən(English)
Extremely rare variant of Briana with the spelling of Rhiannon (See also Brihanna).
Brihaspati
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Bengali, Hindi
Other Scripts: बृहस्पति(Sanskrit, Hindi) বৃহস্পতি(Bengali)
From Sanskrit बृहस्पति (bṛhaspati) meaning "Jupiter (the planet)" or "Thursday". This is the name of a Hindu deity of piety and religious devotion who is often identified with the planet Jupiter.
Brookelynne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: BRUWK-lən
Variant of Brooklyn.
Bulgaria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Bessarabian)
Vernacular form of Pulcheria.
Catira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean)
Means "blonde" in the Cumanagota dialect, a Carib language most common to the native peoples of Venezuela. It is now a name and slang for a blonde-haired person in Venezuela.
Chakravarti
Usage: Indian, Marathi, Hindi
Other Scripts: चक्रवर्ती(Marathi, Hindi)
Derived from Sanskrit चक्रवर्तिन् (chakravartin) meaning "world-ruler, emperor, monarch" (literally "wheel-turner" or "one who's wheels are turning"), from चक्र (chakra) meaning "wheel, circle" and वर्तिन् (vartin) meaning "abiding, moving, turning". In Hinduism this term refers to a ideal, benevolent monarch who rules the entire world. This was also a title adopted by Indian emperors, metaphorically used to describe a ruler whose chariot's wheels rolled without hindrance.
Clairdelune
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino (Rare)
Pronounced: CLĒR-DĒH-LOON
Means "moonlight" in french, this name is common but also rare in the island country of the Philippines.
Cokorda
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Balinese
Other Scripts: ᬘᭀᬓᭀᬃᬤ(Balinese)
From a title derived from Balinese cokor meaning "foot, leg" combined either with ida, a pronoun for a revered person or deity, or Sanskrit देव (deva) meaning "god".
Colorado
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Likely given in reference to the state of Colorado in the United States. The state was named for the Colorado River, which Spanish explorers named the Río Colorado for the ruddy (in Spanish, colorado, or 'colored red') silt the river carried from the mountains.
Cseresznye
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hungarian (Modern, Rare)
Directly taken from Hungarian cseresznye "cherry".
D'Almeida
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Indian (Christian)
Variant of Almeida more commonly used by Indian Christians.
Darwinawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Combination of Darwina and Wati
Dayanghirang
Usage: Filipino, Tagalog
Pronounced: da-yang-hee-RANG(Tagalog)
Means "chosen lady", derived from Tagalog dayang meaning "lady, princess, girl" and hirang "choice, selection".
D'brickashaw
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: də-BRIK-ə-shaw
In the case of former American football player D'Brickashaw Ferguson (1983-), it is inspired by de Bricassart, the surname of a character in the 1977 novel and 1983 television miniseries 'The Thorn Birds'. The character, Irish priest Father Ralph de Bricassart, claims his surname is of Norman origin, however it appears to be invented.
Dekabrin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Soviet, Russian
Other Scripts: Декабрин(Russian)
Pronounced: dyi-ku-BRYEEN(Russian)
Derived from Russian декабрь (dekabr) meaning "December". This name was created by Communist parents who were eager to reject traditional names, and was used in order to commemorate the Decembrist revolt of 1825. Also compare the related name Dekabrist.
Dekabrina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Soviet, Russian
Other Scripts: Декабрина(Russian)
Pronounced: dyi-ku-BRYEE-nə(Russian)
Feminine form of Dekabrin. A known bearer of this name was the Russian chess player Dekabrina Kazatsker (1913-1983).
Dekabrist
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Soviet, Russian
Other Scripts: Декабрист(Russian)
Pronounced: dyi-ku-BRYEEST(Russian)
Derived from Russian декабрист (dekabrist) meaning "Decembrist", which is a term used to refer to someone who participated in (or sympathized with) the Decembrist revolt of 1825. This name was used by Communist parents who were eager to reject traditional names. Also compare the related name Dekabrin.
Denmark
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American), Filipino
Name borne by Denmark Vesey, freed slave.

The name Denmark comes from the state Denmark who ruled Vesey's birth place St. Thomas in the 19th century.

Dewolf
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (Rare)
Pronounced: də-WUWLF
Transferred use of the surname Dewolf. Most notable bearer was American entertainer DeWolf Hopper (1858–1935), best known for his recitations of the famous poem 'Casey at the Bat' by Ernest Thayer (1863–1940).
Dewolf
Usage: Dutch
Pronounced: də-WUWLF
A nickname for one identified with the animal or from a place noted for a sign showing a picture of a wolf. Signs with easily understood pictographs communicated the names of locations in preliterate Europe.
Dimitrius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Δημήτριος(Greek)
Latinized form of Dimitrios, which is the modern Greek form of Demetrios (see Demetrius).
Dinamarca
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Rare)
Pronounced: di-na-MAHR-ka(Latin American Spanish)
From place name Dinamarca.
Disco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Australian)
Pronounced: dis-co(Australian English)
From the French word discothèque (French for "library of phonograph records", but it was subsequently used as a term for nightclubs in Paris), on the pattern of bibliothèque ‘library. Borne by Disco Norris, the son of surfer Justin Norris, of which the name was chosen by his siblings.
Dollar
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: DAHL-ər(American English)
From the English word for the US currency.

From early Flemish or Low German daler, from German T(h)aler, short for Joachimsthaler, a coin from the silver mine of Joachimsthal (‘Joachim's valley’), now Jáchymov in the Czech Republic. The term was later applied to a coin used in the Spanish-American colonies, which was also widely used in the British North American colonies at the time of the American War of Independence, hence adopted as the name of the US monetary unit in the late 18th century.

Dreik
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Modern, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Modern, Rare)
Possibly a borrowing of English Drake.
Duchess
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Old French from medieval Latin ducissa, from Latin dux, duc- (see Duke).
Dutch
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: DUCH
From a nickname given to Americans of German descent. It is related to deutsch, the German word for "German".
Einhorn
Usage: German, Jewish
Other Scripts: אײנהאָרן(Hebrew)
Derived from German Einhorn (Middle High German einhorn) "unicorn", denoting someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a unicorn.
Einojuhani
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: AY-no-yoo-HAHN-ee
Finnish, meaning unknown. Possibly a combination of the Finnish names Eino and Juhani, in which case it could be the Finnish version of "Henri-Johannes." Famous bearer is Einojuhani Rautavaara (1928-2016), a prominent 20th-century Finnish composer and protegee of Jean Sibelius.
Eisenhauer
Usage: German
Pronounced: IE-zin-how-ər
Occupational name meaning "iron cutter" where Eisen- means "iron" and -hauer means "hewer". The verb 'hew' being less well used in English than in earlier times, but still understood to mean cut, such as in hewing tree limbs. Eisenhauer is the original form of the surname of US president (1953-1961) and World War II Army general Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (1890-1969). Eisenhower's ancestors immigrated to Pennsylvania from Germany in the 1740s and at some point the spelling adapted.
Eisenhower
Usage: German
Pronounced: IEZ-ən-how-er
Americanized spelling of German Eisenhauer.
Ekawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: eh-ka-WA-tee
From Indonesian eka meaning "one, first", ultimately from Sanskrit एक (eka), combined with the feminine suffix -wati.
Elcid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino
From Spanish El Cid, which is from Arabic السَيِّد (al-sayyid) meaning "the master, the lord". This was the nickname of Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (1043-1099), an 11th-century Spanish military commander.
England
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
The name England is derived from the Old English name Englaland, which means "land of the Angles".
Englandsfari
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse byname, from Old Norse englandsfari meaning "one who makes voyages to England".
Ernawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Combination of the name Erna 1 and the feminine suffix -wati.
Ernayanti
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Combination of Erna 1 and Yanti.
España
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Hispanic, Rare)
From the Spanish form of the European country Spain.
Estonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Influenced by the country in Europe of the same name.
Ethiopia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American, English
Pronounced: ee-thi-O-pi-ə(African American) e-thee-o-p-a(English)
From the name of the African country. From Greek Αιθιοπια (Aithiopia), derived from αιθω (aitho) meaning "to burn" and ωψ (ops) meaning "face", referring to the skin colour of the inhabitants.
Evangelisto
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Archaic), Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Strictly masculine form of the (nowadays unisex) name Evangelista.
Evella
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, English (American, Rare), Finnish (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: ee-VEL-lə(Literature, American English)
Created by L. Frank Baum for a princess character in his book Ozma of Oz. In the book, Evella is the daughter of Evoldo, king of Ev. Since his children's names start with Ev, Baum has might created the name by using the suffix -ella or by elaborating it.
Facebook
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Obscure
Inspired by the impact social media played in the #Jan25 revolution in Cairo's Tahrir Square, an Egyptian man reportedly named his firstborn daughter "Facebook."
Fatma Zehra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Combination of Fatma and Zehra.
Fils-Aimé
Usage: Haitian Creole
Pronounced: FEES-EH-MEH(French)
Means "beloved son" from French fils meaning "son" and aimé "love".
Finis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (South)
Pronounced: FIE-nis
Means "end" in Latin. This was the middle name of Jefferson Davis (1808-1889), leader of the Confederacy during the American Civil War, who was the last of his parents' ten children. It was first used as a given name in his honour, in the American South.
Finland
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
In reference to the country of Finland. The first known written appearance of the name Finland is thought to be on three rune-stones. Two were found in the Swedish province of Uppland and have the inscription finlonti. The third was found in Gotland, in the Baltic Sea. It has the inscription finlandi and dates from the 13th century. The name can be assumed to be related to the tribe name Finns, which is mentioned first known time AD 98 (disputed meaning).
Fira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Possibly derived simply from the English word fire.
Gatchalian
Usage: Filipino, Tagalog
Pronounced: gat-CHA-lyan(Tagalog)
From a Hispanicised spelling of Gat Sa Li-Han, a Chinese title meaning "lord of Li-Han". It was used by the rulers of Li-Han, an ancient Philippine state that was located in the present-day city of Malolos.
Geevarghese
Usage: Indian (Christian), Malayalam
Other Scripts: ഗീവർഗീസ്(Malayalam)
From the given name Geevarghese, used by Malayalam-speaking Saint Thomas Christians.
Georgelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
Variant of Jorgelina.
Germany
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English
From the country in Europe.
Girlie
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English, Filipino
Pronounced: GUR-lee(English) GEER-lee(Filipino)
Gíta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Modern, Rare)
Icelandic form of Gita.
Goldfinger
Usage: Jewish
Pronounced: GOLD-fing-ər
Ashkenazic Jewish ornamental name composed of gold and finger.
Hagrid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: HA-grid
Invented by J.K. Rowling for the surname of a character in her 'Harry Potter' series of books, from an English slang term for looking exhausted and unwell, related to haggard.
Hanoi
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: American (Hispanic)
From the capital of Vietnam.
Häns’che
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Romani
Pronounced: HENS-khə
Romani form of Hänschen.

The name is borne by the German gypsi guitarrist Häns'che Weiss.

Hänschen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: HENS-khən
German diminutive of Hans, as it contains the German diminutive suffix -chen.

This diminutive, which is typically only used informally, is rather old-fashioned and is now rarely used. These days it is probably more common as a patronymic surname.

In German popular culture, the name is well-known for being the name of the title character of the 19th-century folk song Hänschen klein ("Little Hans") by Franz Wiedemann. It is also the name of a popular character from the German police procedural TV series Tatort (1970-), who was played by the Dutchman Chiem van Houweninge (b. 1940).

Hidayaturrizkiyah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Derives from هداية الرزقية (hidayah al-rizqiyah), "guidance of the livelihood" in Arabic
Hippolyt
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Archaic), German (Swiss, Rare), Alsatian
German form of Hippolytos. A notable bearer is Hippolyt Kempf (born 1965), a Swiss skier and Olympic medalist.
Hiroshima
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Hispanic, Rare), Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
From the city in Japan derived from 広島, meaning "Broad Island" in Japanese. It is not used as a given name in Japan itself.
Hitlerito
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Filipino (Rare)
Pronounced: hit-leh-REE-to
Diminutive of Hitler.
Holland
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (American, Rare)
Pronounced: HAH-lənd(American English)
From the name of geographic places called Holland, or transferred us of the surname Holland.
Idawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: ee-da-WA-tee
Combination of the name Ida and the feminine suffix -wati.
Indíra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Rare)
Icelandic adoption of Indira.
Infinatasia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Combination of Infinity and Asia.
Ireland
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: IER-lənd
From the name of the European island country, derived from Irish Gaelic Éire, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
Irmawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Combination of the name Irma and the feminine suffix -wati.
Iroquois
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: I-rə-kwoi, I-rə-kwa
This name is derived from the name of a historically and powerful Native American league/confederacy in eastern & north-eastern United States and Ontario in Canada (also known as the Haudenosaunee).

One fictional bearer of this name is Iroquois Pliskin, one of the aliases of Solid Snake (one of the main protagonists in the Metal Gear video game series) used in Metal Gear Solid 2.

Italy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
From the country of Italy. Mostly used in America.
Ityoppya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Amharic (Rare)
Other Scripts: ኢትዮጵያ(Amharic)
Rare Amharic form of Ethiopia.
Izzard
Usage: English (British)
Pronounced: IZ-ərd(British English)
Jamiroquai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: jə-MIR-o-kwie
In the case of the band of the same name, which influenced first name usage in the 1990s and 2000s, they conceived it as a combination of jam and iroquai (the latter of the two is based on the Native American confederacy, the Iroquois).
Janeiro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Various (Rare), Portuguese
Means "January" in Portuguese.
Japon
Usage: Filipino, Spanish, French
Pronounced: JA-fon(Filipino) kha-POHN(Spanish) ZHA-PAWN(French)
Ethnic name or regional name for someone from Japan or who had connections with Japan.
Jazzlynn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Variant of Jazlyn.
Jesie
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare), Filipino (Rare), Indonesian (Rare)
Pronounced: JES-ee(English)
This name, as an English name, is a rare variant of Jessie.
Jessé
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
French form of Jesse.
Jetson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: jet-SUN
Transferred use of the surname Jetson.
Jetson
Usage: English
A patronymic from the personal name Jutt, a pet form of Jordan. Compare Judson.
Jitler
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: KHIT-ler(Latin American Spanish)
Variant of Hitler.
Jockaminshaw
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare, Archaic)
Johnamaria
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Combination of John and Maria.
Joker
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Filipino
Probably derived from the name of the playing card.

The name is borne by the Philipine politician Joker Arroyo who has a daughter (!) with the same given name.

Jonjo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (British, Modern, Rare)
A contraction of John and Joe.

The name goes back to the Irish football player John Joe Flood who played in Ireland and England.

Today, there are some persons carrying the name Jonjo, e.g., the English football players Jonjo Dickman and Jonjo Shelvey, and the Northern Irish actor Jonjo O'Neill.

Junot
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean)
Junot Díaz (1968-) is a Dominican-American writer, professor, and editor. Possibly the masculine form of Juno, it is of Latin origin, meaning "young."
Jyothilekshmi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian (Rare), Malayalam (Rare)
Other Scripts: ജ്യോതിലക്ഷ്മി(Malayalam)
Combination of Jyothi and Lekshmi.
Jyotiraditya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hindi
Other Scripts: ज्योतिरादित्य(Hindi)
Pronounced: ʤyotɪrɑdɪtyɑ
One of the Many Names of Lord Krishna, Jyotiraditya, means “The Resplendence of the Sun.”
Kalel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American
Pronounced: Kal-EL
Variant of Kal-El.
Kasszandrosz
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Hungarian masculine form of Cassandra.
Kawenaʻulaokalaniahiʻiakaikapoliopele
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian (Rare)
From ka-wena-ʻula-o-ka-lani-a-hiʻiaka-i-ka-poli-o-pele, which means "the red glow of the heavens of Hiʻiaka in the bosom of Pele" in Hawaiian. This was a name given to Hawaiian scholar and dancer, Mary Kawena Pukui, known as Kawena.
Kawenaʻulaokalaniahiʻiakaikapoliopelekawahineʻaihonua
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian (Rare)
Pronounced: ka.we.na.ʔu.lao̯.ka.la.ni.a.hi.ʔi.a.kai̯.ka.po.li.o.pe.le.ka.wa.hi.ne.ʔai̯.ho.nu.a
From ka-wena-ʻula-o-ka-lani-a-hiʻiaka-i-ka-poli-o-pele-ka-wahine-ʻai-honua-i-nā-lei-lehua-a-pele, which means "the red glow of the heavens of Hiʻiaka in the bosom of Pele, the earth eating woman" in Hawaiian. It's a longer form of Kawenaʻulaokalaniahiʻiakaikapoliopele.
Klopfenstein
Usage: German
It means striking stones
Kochuthresia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian (Christian), Malayalam
Other Scripts: കൊച്ചുത്രേഷ്യ(Malayalam)
Malayalam form of Theresa, borrowed from Portuguese Teresa. Used by Malayalam-speaking Saint Thomas Christians.
Krishnakumar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Tamil, Malayalam
Other Scripts: கிருஷ்ணகுமார்(Tamil) കൃഷ്ണകുമാർ(Malayalam)
Combination of Krishna and Kumar.
Kristinawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
combination of Kristina and Wati
Krúpskaya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Rare)
Pronounced: KROO-pehs-ka-ya(Spanish)
Transferred use of the Russian surname Krúpskaya, honouring Russian revolutionary Nadezhda Krupskaya (1869-1939), the wife of Vladimir Lenin.
Kuvittēriyā
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tamil
Other Scripts: குவித்தேரியா(Tamil)
Tamil form of Quiteria.
Lakshmi-Narayana
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Sanskrit, Hinduism
Variant spelling of Lakshminarayan.
Laleña
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: lə-LAYN-yə
Perhaps a contracted form of Lotte and Lenya. It was invented by Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan for the title character of a 1968 song, which was allegedly inspired by the Austrian actress Lotte Lenya (1898–1981).
Laranjeira
Usage: Portuguese
It means "orange tree" in Portuguese
Leilane
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Modern)
Variant of the Leilani.
Leilani
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: lay-LA-nee
Means "heavenly flowers" or "royal child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Leylani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino (Rare), Spanish (Mexican)
Variant of Leilani.
Lindawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
From the name Linda combined with the feminine suffix -wati.
Loreley
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Germanic Mythology, Spanish
Older German form of Lorelei. This was the pen name of Mexican writer María Luisa Garza (1887-1980). It is also borne by Argentine model and actress Luisana Loreley Lopilato (1987-), the wife of Canadian singer Michael Bublé.
Lufthansa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Rare)
Pronounced: luwft-HAN-za
Lufthansa is the name of the German national carrier. It was given as a second name to a girl born on a Lufthansa flight to New York in the 1960s.

It is usually not admissible as a given name in Germany.

Luluvioletta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Hispanic)
Combination of Lulu an Violetta.
Macedonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: mah-the-DO-nyah(European Spanish) mah-se-DO-nyah(Latin American Spanish)
Feminine form of Macedonio. It is also part of a name of the country (officially Republic of Macedonia/The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia) in south-eastern Europe.
Macedonio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: mah-the-DO-nyo(European Spanish) mah-se-DO-nyo(Latin American Spanish) mah-che-DO-nyo(Italian)
This name is derived from Latin Macedonius meaning "Macedonian," which is derived from Greek Makedones. That word literally means "highlanders" or "the tall ones," which is related to makednos meaning "long, tall" and makros "long, large."

Bearers of this name include Argentine writer, humourist and philosopher Macedonio Fernández (1874-1952), Italian physicist Macedonio Melloni (1798-1854) and Mexican violinist, pianist and songwriter Macedonio Alcalá (1831-1869).

Madeinusa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: mah-day-NOO-sa(Latin American Spanish)
This Peruvian-Quechua (mis)interpretation of products labeled "Made In USA" resulted in this name of the main character, a young village girl in Madeinusa, a 2005 Peruvian-Spanish drama film.
Maeva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tahitian, French
Pronounced: MA-EH-VA(French)
Means "welcome" in Tahitian. It gained popularity in France during the 1980s.
Magneto
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Magneto is the 'mutant' name of an antagonist, and sometimes protagonist, of Marvel's X-Men line of comics. His real name is Max Eisenhardt, and he's used the alias of Erik Lehnsherr many times, though he is more frequently known simply as Magneto. His mutant name is a reference to his mutant ability: magnetic manipulation. He is the father of Polaris, Scarlet Witch, and Quicksilver. He is portrayed by actors Sir Ian McKellan (older Magneto) and Michael Fassbender (younger Magneto) in Fox's X-Men film series.
Maharlika
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Filipino
Other Scripts: ᜋᜑᜎᜒᜃ(Baybayin)
Means "freeman, noble, aristocratic" in Tagalog, ultimately from Sanskrit महर्द्धिक (maharddhika) meaning "very prosperous". This was the term used to the warrior class in ancient Tagalog society.
Maori
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Borrowed from New Zealand Maori māori (“aborigine, native; normal, ordinary, plain”).
Mardiningsih
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Obscure
Mardiningsih "Mardi" Arquette (1939-1997), aka Brenda Denaut, was the mother of actors Patricia, Alexis, Rosanna, David and Richmond Arquette.
Marenglen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
Albanian name created to honour Marx, Engels and Lenin.
Márió
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hungarian
Hungarian form of Mario.
Matheos
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: ma-tey-OS
From the given name Matheos, a variant of Matthias. This surname is found among Indonesian populations.
Matheos
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: ma-tey-OS
From the given name Matheos, a variant of Matthias. This surname is found among Indonesian populations.
Mäx
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: MEKS
Variant of Max suggesting an English pronunciation.
Mayahuel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Spanish (Mexican, Rare), American (Hispanic, Rare)
Possibly means "that which surrounds the maguey plant" in Nahuatl, from ‘metl meaning "maguey (species Agave americana)" and yahualli "round". In Aztec religion this was the name of a goddess who personified the maguey plant.
Megalopolis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: may-ga-lo-po-lis
Allegoric personification of the German state Mecklenburg. Very rarely (if ever) used as a given name.
Melschoi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Mongolian, Russian
Name composed of the first letters of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin, and Choibalsan.
Miamor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare), American (Hispanic, Modern, Rare), Filipino (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: MEE-ə-mawr(English) mee-a-MOR(Spanish)
From the Spanish phrase mi amor meaning "my love."
Miamore
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare), American (Hispanic, Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: MEE-ə-mawr(English)
Variant of Miamor.
Mihangel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Welsh name of the archangel Michael, formed from a contraction of Michael and "angel".
Minervinus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was a derivative of the Roman goddess Minerva.
Mizpah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Filipino (Rare)
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Derived from Hebrew מִצְפָּה (miṣpāh, mitspah) "watchtower". As mentioned in the biblical story of Jacob and Laban, making a pile of stones marked an agreement between two people, with God as their watching witness.
Monalisa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Indian, Portuguese (Brazilian), Various
From Mona Lisa meaning "Madam Lisa", derived from the archaic Italian term of address monna (a contraction of Old Italian ma donna "my lady") and the name Lisa. Since the mid-20th century this name has been used rarely but regularly in the United States, due to Nat King Cole's 1950 song Mona Lisa, the title and lyrics of which refer to the world-famous Leonardo da Vinci painting known as the Mona Lisa - a portrait of Lisa del Giocondo (1479-1542).
Naranja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Icelandic
Pronounced: Nar-Ann-ha(Spanish)
The Spanish word for the colour Orange.
Narcisco
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Variant of Narciso, probably influenced by Francisco.
Nausicaa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ναυσικάα(Ancient Greek)
Latinized form of Greek Ναυσικάα (Nausikaa) meaning "burner of ships". In Homer's epic the Odyssey this is the name of a daughter of Alcinous who helps Odysseus on his journey home.
Naŭsikaa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Esperanto form of Nausicaa.
Neinstein
Usage: German, Jewish
Other Scripts: נייַנשטיין(Hebrew)
Means “nine stones” in German
Nélson
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 0% based on 1 vote
Portuguese form of Nelson.
Nigeria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern)
From the name of the African country.
Nilawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: nee-la-WA-tee
Derived from Indonesian nila meaning "blue", ultimately from Sanskrit नील (nila), combined with the feminine suffix -wati.
Ninasimone
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Used by fans in reference to the singer Nina Simone.
Nirwana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: neer-WA-na
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
Means "heaven" or "enlightenment, liberation" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit निर्वाण (nirvana).
Noelvis
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American), Spanish (Caribbean)
Pronounced: no-EHL-bees(Spanish)
Combination of Noel (or its derivations), the infix -el-, stemming from names like Elvia, and the suffix -is (or Elvis).
Norway
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
From the name of the European country.
Nschotschi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, German (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: NSHO-chee(Literature)
Nscho-Tschi is the sister of Winnetou in the novels by the german author Karl May. The meaning is given as "bright day".

The name is bourne by the german artist Nschotschi Haslinger

Nubia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the name of the ancient region and kingdom in Africa, south of Egypt. It possibly derives from the Egyptian word nbw meaning "gold".
Oktyabrina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian (Rare)
Other Scripts: Октябрина(Russian)
Pronounced: uk-tyi-BRYEE-nə
Derived from Russian октябрь (oktyabr) meaning "October". This name was created by Communist parents who were eager to reject traditional names and commemorate the October Revolution of 1917.
Okyanus
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Turkish
Derived from the Turkish noun okyanus meaning "ocean", which is ultimately derived from Okeanos, the name of a Titan in Greek mythology.
Oluwatoniloba
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yoruba
Means "God is good to have a king" in Yoruba. This is the full given name of the winner of "Germany's Next Top Model" 2018, Oluwatoniloba Dreher-Adnuga.
Orscheli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Swiss)
Swiss form of Ursula.
Ottheinrich
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German (Rare, Archaic)
Pronounced: ot-HIEN-rikh
Contraction of Otto and Heinrich.

A famous name bearer was Otto-Henry (in German Ottheinrich), Elector Palatine (1502–1559).

Oyuki
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese (Archaic), Spanish (Latin American), American (Hispanic)
Other Scripts: お幸, お雪, etc.(Kanji/Hiragana) おゆき(Japanese Hiragana) オユキ(Japanese Katakana)
Pronounced: O-YOO-KYEE(Japanese) o-YOO-kee(Latin American Spanish, Hispanic American)
From Yuki prefixed with the honorific 御/お- (o), used with regards to female names from around the Kamakura and Muromachi periods to around the 20th century.

This was the name of the main character in the Mexican comic 'El pecado de Oyuki' (Oyuki's Sin) by Yolanda Vargas Dulché, published first in the comic book 'Pepín' in 1949 and then in 'Lágrimas, Risas y Amor' in 1975, subsequently adapted into a telenovela, portrayed by Ana Martín, in 1987-8.

Pachandra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romani (Caló)
Pronounced: pa-CHAN-dra(Caló)
Directly taken from Caló pachandra "Easter", this name is used as the Caló form of Pascua / Pascuala.
Pangeran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Indonesian and Malay form of Prince
Parzival
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Variant form of Parsifal.
Peaches
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PEE-chiz, PEE-chəz
Late Middle English from Old French pesche, from medieval Latin persica, from Latin persicum, literally ‘Persian apple.’A bearer of the given name is Peaches Geldof, daughter of Irish singer Bob Geldof.
Peachtreanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare), Obscure
Blend of the phrase "peach tree" and Anna.
Peñaflorida
Usage: Spanish (Philippines)
Pronounced: peh-nyu-plo-REE-du(Filipino Spanish)
"flowery cliff" in Spanish
Phantom
Gender: Masculine
Usage: American (South, Rare, Archaic)
From the English word "phantom" a synonym for "ghost", ultimately from Greek φάντασμα (phántasma) "phantom, ghost", "vision, dream", "fantasy".
Pharaoh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Mormon, African American
Pharaoh is a title used in many modern discussions of the rulers of all Ancient Egyptian dynasties. Historically, however, "pharaoh" only started being used as a title for the king during the New Kingdom, specifically during the middle of the eighteenth dynasty, after the reign of Hatshepsut. From the Middle English pharao, from the Late Latin pharaō, from the Ancient Greek pharaṓ (φαραώ), from the Hebrew par‘ōh (פַּרְעֹה), ultimately derived from the Ancient Egyptian pr ˤ3 'palace, pharaoh', from pr 'house' and ˤ3 'great, big'.

Noted bearers include Grammy Award winning American jazz saxophonist, Pharoah Sanders, born Farrell Sanders (b.1940), and American rapper Pharoahe Monch, born Troy Donald Jamerson (b.1972).

Prophet
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
Rating: 100% based on 1 vote
From the English word prophet, ultimately from Ancient Greek προφήτης prophḗtēs "one who speaks for a god".
Purnamasari
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: poor-na-ma-SA-ree
From Indonesian purnama meaning "full moon" combined with sari meaning "essence".
Qirin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American
A chimerical creature from East Asian mythology (Chinese/pinyin: qílín, Japanese kirin).
Quadratus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Derived from Latin quadratus meaning "square." This name has been borne by several saints, such as Quadratus the Apologist of Athens.
Quaresma
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Means "Lent", the liturgical time, in Portuguese.
Quetzala
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Mexican, Rare)
From Quetzala, the name of a river in Mexico. Quetzala is likely derived from Nahuatl quetzalli, "quetzal feather". The word quetzalli also denotes something precious. The quetzal held great cultural and religious significance to the Aztecs, and other indigenous peoples of Central America. It was a prominent, sacred image in artwork and legends.
Quetzalxochitl
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Nahuatl
Means "feather flower" or "precious flower" in Nahuatl, from Nahuatl quetzalli "feather" or "precious" and xochitl "flower".
Quiteria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Aragonese, Galician, Gascon, History (Ecclesiastical)
Possibly a Latinized form of Kythereia, perhaps influenced by Latin quietus "calm, quiet". Saint Quiteria was a semi-legendary Iberian martyr of the 5th century. Honoured by both Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy on May 22, she is a patron against rabies.
Quyllur
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Quechua
Means "star" in Quechua.
Raditya
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦫꦢꦶꦠꦾ(Javanese)
Derived from Javanese aditya meaning "sun" or "Sunday", ultimately from the name of the Hindu god Aditya.
Rajeshwari
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indian, Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Marathi
Other Scripts: राजेश्वरी(Hindi, Marathi) ರಾಜೇಶ್ವರಿ(Kannada) రాజేశ్వరీ(Telugu) ராஜேஸ்வரி(Tamil)
From Sanskrit राजराजेश्वरी (Rājarājeśvarī) meaning "Queen of Queens", another name for Tripura Sundari ("Goddess of Three Cities").
Respati
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦫꦺꦱ꧀ꦥꦠꦶ(Javanese)
Pronounced: rehs-PA-tee(Indonesian)
Javanese form of Brihaspati.
Respatiwulan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Other Scripts: ꦫꦺꦱ꧀ꦥꦠꦶꦮꦸꦭꦤ꧀(Javanese)
Pronounced: rɛs.ˈpa.tiwu.lan
combination of Respati and Wulan
Retifa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare)
Maybe a feminine form of Rétif.
Rinawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: ree-na-WA-tee
Combination of the name Rina and the feminine suffix -wati.
Risna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Rizqiyaningsih
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Derived from Arabic رزق (rizq) meaning "livelihood" combined with Ningsih.
Rizqiyyatutthoyyibah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Derives from رزقية الثويبة (rizqiyah al-thawayiba), "livelihood deserving of God's reward" in Arabic
Rohani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Other Scripts: روحاني(Malay Jawi)
Pronounced: ro-HA-nee(Indonesian)
Means "spiritual" in Indonesian and Malay, derived from roh meaning "spirit, soul" (of Arabic origin).
Romania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Dutch (Rare), Italian (Rare), Spanish (Latin American, Rare)
Pronounced: ro-MAH-nee-ah(Dutch)
Feminine form of Romanius.

In modern times, Romania is also the name of a country in Europe. Its name is etymologically related, as it is ultimately derived from the Latin noun Romanus meaning "citizen of Rome" (see Roman).

Rósenberg
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic
Icelandic variant of Rósberg.
Rösli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Swiss)
Diminutive of Rose and Rosa.
Roslinawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Combination of Roslina and the feminine suffix -wati.
Rosmawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Pronounced: ros-ma-WA-tee(Indonesian)
Combination of the name Rosma and the feminine suffix -wati.
Rosnawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: ros-na-WA-tee
Combination of Rosna and the feminine suffix -wati.
Rosnita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, Malay
Pronounced: ros-NEE-ta(Indonesian)
Elaboration of Rosni.
Russiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Feminine form of Russian.
Rwanda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Variant of Rhonda influenced by the spelling of the African country Rwanda.
Salipada
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Maguindanao
Derived from Sanskrit श्रीपाद (śrī́pā́da) meaning "holy foot", from श्री (śrī́) "sacred, holy" and पाद (pā́da) "foot". A notable bearer was Salipada (or Saripada) Pendatun (1912-1985), a Filipino Muslim statesman and military officer.
Schahnaz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
German form of Shahnaz.
Schneewittchen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Folklore (Germanized), German (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: shneh-VIT-khən
Means "snow white" in German. This is the name of an unfortunate princess hated by her stepmother in a traditional German folktale, immortalized first by the Brothers Grimm retelling in their "Grimms' Fairy Tales" (1812, 1854) and then by Walt Disney's animated film (1937).

This name should not be confused with Schneeweißchen, the German form of the name borne by a peasant girl in the traditional German folktale "Snow-White and Rose-Red" or "The Ungrateful Dwarf".

Scotland
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
From the name of the country Scotland, meaning "land of the Scots", from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker".
Seaborn
Usage: English
From an Old English personal name derived from the elements "sea, lake" and beorn "warrior".
Sequoia
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: sə-KWOI-ə
From the name of huge trees that grow in California. The tree got its name from the 19th-century Cherokee scholar Sequoyah (also known as George Guess), the inventor of the Cherokee writing system.
Sequoyah
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indigenous American, Cherokee
Possibly from Cherokee siqua meaning "hog". This was the name of the Cherokee man (also known as George Guess) who devised the Cherokee writing system in the 19th century.
Serbia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various (Rare)
After the country Serbia.
Sesar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Icelandic, American (Hispanic, Rare), Indonesian (Rare)
Form of Caesar.
Seseer
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Mongolian, Russian
Meaning, "USSR."
Shaq
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Modern)
Short form of Shaquille.
Shawneene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Pronounced: shaw-nee-nee
Means "Palm Sunday". A famous bearer was Shawneene George/Joseph, a third-class survivor of the Titanic disaster.
Silenus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Σειληνός(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sie-LEEN-əs
Latinized form of the Greek Seilenos, meaning "sloshing in the wine trough." In mythology, Silenus was the tutor and chief companion of the Greek wine-god Dionysus, and he possessed special knowledge and the power of prophecy when drunk. When Silenus was brought to the court of King Midas (after either falling asleep from drugged water or being found wandering the woods lost) to impart his wisdom, the king asked him what was greatest in all the world. Silenus replied, "The best thing for a man is not to be born, and if already born, to die as soon as possible." This became known as the Wisdom of Silenus.
Síta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Icelandic (Rare)
Icelandic form of Sita.
Situ
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 司徒(Chinese)
Pronounced: SUZ-TOO
From Chinese 司徒 (sītú), which was a title for one of the highest ranking government positions in ancient China.
Sivakumar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada
Other Scripts: ശിവകുമാർ(Malayalam) சிவகுமார்(Tamil) శివకుమార్(Telugu) ಶಿವಕುಮಾರ್(Kannada)
Combination of the names Siva and Kumar.
Sóchitl
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Mexican, Rare), Central American (Rare)
Pronounced: SO-cheetl(Spanish)
Variant of Xóchitl.
Sonsiré
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
Pronounced: son-see-REH(Spanish)
Spanish variant of the name Sonseeahray, used for a young Apache girl in the American Western film 'Broken Arrow', first released in the United States in 1950. It is mainly used in Venezuela.
Sriwati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: sree-WA-tee, sə-ree-WA-tee
From the Indonesian title of respect sri, ultimately from Sanskrit श्री (shri), combined with the feminine suffix -wati.
Sudan
Usage: Arabic, Italian, Spanish
Other Scripts: سُودان(Arabic)
Ethnic name or regional name for someone from Sudan or who had traded with Sudan. The name of the country is ultimately derived from Arabic سُود (sud) meaning "black", referring to the darker skin of the inhabitants.
Sudan
Usage: African
Suparman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Javanese
Other Scripts: ꦱꦸꦥꦂꦩꦤ꧀(Javanese)
Pronounced: soo-PAR-man(Indonesian)
From the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with परम (parama) meaning "absolute, ultimate".
Sweden
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American, Modern, Rare)
From the name of the European country.
Tanajara
Usage: Japanese (Hispanicized), Spanish (Mexican)
Hispanicized form of Tanahara.
Tanqueray
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare)
Tanzania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
From the name of the African country.
Tavius
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare)
Short form of Octavius.
T9c
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: American (South)
Pronounced: tee-NIEN-see
This very rare name is an exception to the rule that numerals are normally not allowed as part of the spelling of names in the United States. It's a creative rebus-like spelling of a slang intensive term for "tiny" found in the Southwestern United States. Most Americans would be familiar with terms like "teeny-tiny", "teensy-weensy", etc. "Teeninecy" is a rare variation of these that's found in the Deep South, and as a rare slang term it doesn't have a set spelling, with teeninesy, teeninetsy, teaninesea, and many others being found. Though a couple of other spellings have been used as names, T9C seems to be the most common in that role. It probably began in Texas in the 19th century as the earliest examples found so far are from that state.
Téngyuán
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 藤原(Chinese)
Pronounced: TUNG-WEHN
From Chinese 藤 (téng) meaning "wisteria" combined with 原 (yuán) meaning "origin, source".
Tetra
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare), English
From the Greek prefix tetra- meaning, “four.”
Tex
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEHKS
From a nickname denoting a person who came from the state of Texas. A famous bearer was the American animator Tex Avery (1908-1980), real name Frederick, who was born in Texas.
Texana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (Rare)
Pronounced: tek-SAN-ə, teg-ZAN-ə
Variant of Texanna.
Texanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: American (South, Modern)
Pronounced: tek-SAN-ə, teg-ZAN-ə
Possible feminization of Texas, using a combination of Tex and Anna.
Texas
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: TEK-sus
Caddo word meaning "Friend", referring to the larger Caddo nation (in opposition to enemy tribes). The name was borrowed into Spanish as texa, plural texas, and used to refer to the Caddo Nation. Diminutive is Tex.
Thuwaybah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ثويبة(Arabic)
Means "deserving of God's reward" in Arabic. This was the name of the wet nurse of the Muslim prophet Muhammad. She later became one of his early followers.
Tiyana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian, English
Variant of Tiana.
Toyota
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American (Rare)
Pronounced: toi-O-tə(English)
From the name of the Japanese car company (See Mercedes, Ferrari and Porsche).

From Japanese トヨタ (Toyota), from the name of the Toyoda family. The spelling was changed to Toyota because of a belief that it sounded better, or because トヨタ takes eight strokes to write, and 8 is considered lucky.

Toyota Motor Corporation (Japanese: トヨタ自動車株式会社, Hepburn: Toyota Jidōsha KK) is a Japanese multinational automotive manufacturer headquartered in Toyota, Aichi, Japan. In 2017, Toyota's corporate structure consisted of 364,445 employees worldwide and, as of December 2019, was the tenth-largest company in the world by revenue. Toyota is the largest automobile manufacturer in Japan, and the second-largest in the world behind Volkswagen, based on 2018 unit sales.

Tridevi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Gujarati, Odia, Marathi, Rajasthani, Bengali, Nepali, Kannada, Konkani, Assamese, Manipuri, Fijian
Other Scripts: त्रिदेवी(Hindi, Marathi, Konkani) திரிதேவி(Tamil) త్రిదేవి(Telugu) ത്രിദേവി(Malayalam) ત્રિદેવી(Gujarati) ତୃଦେବୀ(Odia) तरइदऐवइ(Rajasthani) তৃডেভি(Bengali, Assamese) त्रिडेवि(Nepali) ತ್ರಿದೆವಿ(Kannada) ꯃꯤꯇꯩꯃꯤ(Meitei)
Pronounced: tri-deh-vi
The Tridevi is a Concept in Hinduism joining a Triad of Eminent Goddesses. The Feminine Form of Trimurti.
Trimurti
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Sanskrit
Other Scripts: त्रिमुरटी(Sanskrit)
Pronounced: trɪmʊətɪ
Trimurti in Hinduism, Triad of the Three Gods Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva. The Concept was known at least by the time of Kalidasa's Poem, Kumarasambhava.
Trimurtí
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romani (Caló)
Pronounced: tree-mur-TEE(Caló)
Directly taken from Caló trimurtí "Trinity", this name is used as the Caló form of Trinity.
Trisnawati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: trees-na-WA-tee
Derived from Javanese trisna meaning "love" combined with the feminine suffix -wati.
Tristopher
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture
Pronounced: TRI-stə-fər
Possibly a combination of Tristan and Christopher. This is the middle name of Gumball Watterson in the Cartoon Network T.V. series The Amazing World of Gumball.
Turquoia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American
Blending of Turquoise and Sequoia
Turquoise
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare, Archaic)
From the opaque blue-green mineral whose name is derived from French pierre turquois "Turkish stone".

In the English-speaking world, it was occasionally used from the late 19th century onwards.

Tywaniquekya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: African American, Obscure
Extremely rare feminized elaboration of the place name Taiwan.
Tywayne
Gender: Masculine
Usage: African American (Modern, Rare)
Combination of Tyson and Wayne.
Urduja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Filipino, Pangasinan
From Sanskrit उदय (ud-ayá) meaning "rising, rise" or ऊर्जा (ūrjā) meaning "vigour, strength, energy". This was the name of a legendary Philippine warrior princess from Pangasinan.
Usmail
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean)
Commonly used by Cubans and Cuban-American immigrants, this name is inspired by the U.S. Mail service.
Usnavi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Popular Culture (Rare)
Pronounced: OOS-nah-vee, YOOS-nah-vee
Created name, likely a pun or misunderstanding on U.S. Navy. The name is most notably borne by the main character of the musical In The Heights, Usnavi De La Vega, by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Quiara Alegría Hudes.
Venkateshwara
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Telugu
Other Scripts: వేంకటేశ్వరుడు(Telugu)
From Venkata, the name of a hill in Andhra Pradesh state, India, combined with Sanskrit ईश्वर (ishvara) meaning "lord, god". This is the name of a form of the Hindu god Vishnu particularly revered in southern India.
Vigneshwaran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indian, Tamil, Malayalam
Other Scripts: விக்னேஸ்வரன்(Tamil) വിഗ്നേശ്വരന്‍(Malayalam)
Possibly a combination of Vignesh and Tamil வர்ணம் (varṇam) or Malayalam വര്‍ണ്ണം (varṇṇaṁ) both meaning "colour", likely derived from Sanskrit वर्ण (varna) which has the same meaning. Alternatively, Vigneshwaran could derive from विघ्नेश्वर (vighneśvara) meaning "lord of obstacles" in Sanskrit, referring to Ganesh's primary function in Hinduism as the master and remover of obstacles.
Viliamu
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Samoan
Samoan form of William
Wales
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (American)
From a place name in the United Kingdom. Derives from the Old English Wælisc, meaning 'foreigner, Welshman'.
Wazowski
Usage: Popular Culture (Rare)
A form of the surname Lebowski
Weintraub
Usage: German, Jewish
Pronounced: Vine-trawb
This surname translates into English as “grape”.
Wendywati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare)
Pronounced: wehn-dee-WA-tee
Combination of the name Wendy and the feminine suffix -wati.
Why
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Indonesian (Rare)
Pronounced: Wi
Wikramawardhana
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History
Derived from Sanskrit विक्रम (vikrama) meaning "stride, pace, valour" and वर्धन (vardhana) meaning "increasing, growing, thriving". This was the name of the fifth king of the Majapahit Empire who reigned from 1389 to 1429.
Wiliama
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of William.
Winnetou
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature, German (Modern, Rare)
Pronounced: WIN-nə-too
Winnetou is a fictional Apache chief in several works of the German novelist Karl May. According to an apocryphal story the name means "burning water". The name is probably made up by Karl May.

The name Winnetou is permitted as a given name in Germany.

Xavierson
Usage: English (Rare)
Means “son of Xavier”.
Xigua
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese (Rare, ?)
Other Scripts: 西瓜(Chinese)
From Chinese 西瓜 (xīguā) meaning "watermelon".
Xiong
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: (Chinese)
Pronounced: SHYUWNG
From Chinese 熊 (xióng) meaning "bear".
Xochi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mayan
Diminutive of Xochitl.
Yansi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean)
Yayauhqui
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Aztec
Means "black smoking mirror" in Nahuatl.
Yesua
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: YEH-soo-a
From the given name Yesua, a variant of Yeshua. This surname is found among Indonesian populations.
Yggdrasil
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Possibly means "Odin's gallows", referring to how Odin hanged himself from it to gain knowledge of the runes. In Norse mythology this is the name of the mythical tree that connects the Realms.
Yoga
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: YO-ga
Derived from Sanskrit योग (yoga) referring to a set of Hindu and Buddhist practices centred around spiritual insight and tranquility. The word itself means "yoking, joining, attaching" in Sanskrit.
Yoginampati
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Malayalam
Other Scripts: യൊഗിനമ്പതി(Malayalam)
Pronounced: jogɪnɑmpɑtɪ
Means "lord of the yogis" in Malayalam. A yogi is a devotee or adherent of yoga.
Yorelvis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
An elaboration of Elvis.
Yorleny
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: jyor-LEH-nee(Spanish) yor-LEH-nee(Spanish)
Apparently from the English phrase Yours Lenny, signed at the end of letters by a sailor named Lenny Smith to his Costa Rican wife, hence why usage of this name is mainly concentrated in that country.
It has been in use since the 1940s, becoming popular by the late 1960s.
Youngblood
Usage: English
Americanisation of the German surname Jungbluth.
Yuribert
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish (Caribbean, Rare)
Possibly a combination of Yuri with a name that contains the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright", such as Albert and Robert.
Yuritzi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mayan, Spanish (Mexican, Rare)
Pronounced: yoo-REE-tsee(Mayan)
Yuritzi is a Mayan name used in Mexico which means "moon's lightening-bearer goddess".
Yusfi
Usage: Indonesian
Cognate of Yousfi.
Zaffarana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Means "saffron" in Sicilian Arabic, from Arabic زعفران (za'farān), "saffron".
Zerubbabel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, English (Puritan)
Other Scripts: זְרֻבָּבֶל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: zeh-ru-BAH-bel(Biblical English)
Possibly means "conceived and born in Babylon" from a contraction of either Assyrian-Babylonian Zəru Bābel "seed of Babylon" or Hebrew זְרוּעַ בָּבֶל (Zərua‘ Bāvel) "the one sown of Babylon". In the Old Testament he led the first group of Jews out of captivity in Babylon in the first year of the Persian king Cyrus.
Zeyde
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: זיידע(Yiddish)
Means "grandfather" in Yiddish.
This is a so-called amuletic name which was given to a child who was ill, or one whose parents had lost children before. It was chosen in the hope that the child would live to be a grandfather.
Zornitza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian
Other Scripts: Зорница(Bulgarian)
Variant transcription of Зорница (see Zornitsa).
Zorobabel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Variant of Zerubbabel.
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