Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the usage is English; and the order is random.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Cadbury English
Derived from Norman French
Lever French, English
Nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from Old French levre ‘hare’ (Latin lepus, genitive leporis). It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a hunter of hares... [more]
Buxton English
1. A habitational name for someone from Buxton in Derbyshire, from the Middle English Buchestanes or Bucstones (meaning "bowing stones"), from Old English būgan meaning "to bow" and stanes, meaning "stones".... [more]
Ormay English (American)
Believed to be the Americanization of the last name Ormoi from Hungary.
Norwel English
English surname meaning "From the North Spring"
Bron English
Variant of Brown (See also Bronson).
Medley English
Habitational name, either a variant of Madeley (a name common to several places, including one in Shropshire and two in Staffordshire), named in Old English as ‘Mada’s clearing’, from an unattested byname, Mada (probably a derivative of mad ‘foolish’) + leah ‘woodland clearing’; or from Medley on the Thames in Oxfordshire, named in Old English with middel ‘middle’ + eg ‘island’... [more]
Abner English
From the given name Abner
Gilby English
Means either (i) "person from Gilby", Lincolnshire ("Gilli's farm"); or (ii) "little Gilbert".
Ketcham English
Reduced form of Kitchenham
Alexis German, French, English, Greek
From the given name Alexis
Childers English
Probably a habitational name from some lost place named Childerhouse, from Old English cildra "child" and hus "house". This may have referred to some form of orphanage.
Ashmore English
English locational name, from either "Aisemare", (from Old English pre 7th Century "aesc" meaning ash plus "mere" a lake; hence "lake where ash-trees grow), or from any of several minor places composed of the Old English elements "aesc" ash plus "mor" a marsh or fen.
Summerlin English, German, Scottish
An English surname.... [more]
Mantia English (?)
This is my last name. I honestly don't know where it came from. But it's a last name because it's mine lol
Cassel English, French, German
A surname derived from the Latin military term castellum "watchtower, fort". A variant spelling of the word castle. Denoted someone hailing from the commune of Cassel in the Nord départment in northern France or the city of Kassel (spelled Cassel until 1928) in Germany... [more]
Wrenn English
Derived from the surname Wren... [more]
Elizabethson English (Rare)
Means “son of Elizabeth”.
Gilkeson English, Scottish
From the Scottish Gilchristson(son of Gilchrist) meaning "son of the servant/devotee of Christ"
Lombard French, English
French and English cognate of Lombardi.
Barrow English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named with Old English bearo, bearu "grove" or from Barrow in Furness, Cumbria, which is named with an unattested Celtic word, barr, here meaning "promontory", and Old Norse ey "island"... [more]
Covey Irish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
Leather English, Scottish
A metonymic occupational name for a leatherworker or seller of leather goods, and derived from Middle English and Old English lether meaning "leather".
Beauchamp English, French
From the name of various places in France, for example in Manche and Somme, which was derived from Old French beu, bel meaning "fair, lovely" and champ, champs "field, plain".
Rhett English, Dutch
Anglicized form of Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel".
Boynton English
Variant of Boyton, from a place in Lancashire, England.
Lynds English
Variant of Lind, predominantly found in Kent.
Ship English
This unusual name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is an occupational surname for "a mariner", or perhaps, occasionally a "ship or boat-builder". The derivation of the name is from the Olde English pre 7th Century scip, ship, in Middle English schip
Laithen English
English habitational name from any of various places so called, for example in Lancashire (near Blackpool) and in North Yorkshire. The former was named in Old English as ‘settlement by the watercourse’, from Old English lad ‘watercourse’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’; the latter as ‘leek enclosure’ or ‘herb garden’, from leac ‘leek’ + tun... [more]
Gunner English
From Old English gunne meaning "cannon, gun" and the agent suffix "-er"
Buttery English (British)
The baker in Old English.
Brumby English
English habitational name from a place in Lincolnshire named Brumby, from the Old Norse personal name Brúni or from Old Norse brunnr "well" + býr "farmstead, village".
Lillingstone English
It indicates familial origin within either of 2 villages in Buckinghamshire: Lillingstone Dayrell or Lillingstone Lovell.
Hitchins English
Comes from the town Hitchin
Huckleberry English (American)
Anglicized form of German Hackelberg.
Sherrell English
This surname is of English locational origin, from the place in Devonshire called Shirwell. The placename is first recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Sirewelle, and by 1242 as Shirewill... [more]
Brynn English
Derived from the given name Brynn.
Westgate English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a west gate in a city, or a habitual surname for someone from Westgate. It is derived from Middle English west meaning "west" and gate "gate" (or "street" in northern and eastern areas; from Old Norse gata).
Root English, Dutch
English: nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English rote ‘glad’ (Old English rot). ... [more]
Pook English
Pooke was the original version... [more]
Manford English
Place name for "Munda's ford" from an Old English personal name Munda, the same element in the second syllable of Edmund and ford meaning a waterway crossing.
Shropshire English
Regional name from the county of Shropshire, on the western border of England with Wales.
Northern English
Topographic name, from an adjectival form of North.
Fenner English
A surname of either Old French origin, allegedly meaning “huntsman”, or else more probably referring to those who were brought over from the Low Countries to assist in draining the “fens” or wetlands of England and Ireland – a process which lasted from the 9th to the 18th centuries.
Hatch English
English (mainly Hampshire and Berkshire): topographic name from Middle English hacche ‘gate’, Old English hæcc (see Hatcher). In some cases the surname is habitational, from one of the many places named with this word... [more]
Raspberry English
Variant spelling of Rasberry.
Porcari Italian, English
From Italian porci "pigs", denoting someone who worked as a pig herder.
Southwell English
English surname meaning "From the south well"
Gilliard English, Northern Irish
English and northern Irish (county Down) variant of Gillard.
Maness English (American)
Probably a variant of Manes.
Shinn English
Metonymic occupational name for a Skinner, from Old English scinn, Middle English shin ‘hide’, ‘pelt’. In Middle English this word was replaced by the Norse equivalent, skinn.
Purdom English
English: metathesized variants of Prudhomme; the -ru- reversal is a fairly common occurrence in words where -r- is preceded or followed by a vowel.
Waynewright English
Variant spelling of Wainwright.
Feinsot English
Possibly related to Feinstein.
Stanwick English
Habitational name from a place so called in Northamptonshire, named in Old English with stan ‘stone’ + wic ‘outlying dairy farm’.
Brooker English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a stream, a variant of Brook.
Press English, Jewish
A nickname for a pious individual from the Middle English form of "priest" or possibly someone employed by a priest. In the Jewish sense, one whose occupation was to iron clothes.
Baily English
Variant of Bailey.
Whent English
Topographical for someone who lived by a cross road, or perhaps a very sharp bend in the road. The derivation being from the Olde English pre 7th century word "wendan," meaning to wander.
Craw English, Scottish, Northern Irish
One who had characteristics of a crow; sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Crawford, and Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire, Crawshawbooth in Lancashire, and Crawley in Sussex
Whately English
Old English location or occupational surname meaning "from the wheat meadow".
Hubble English
From the Norman personal name Hubald, composed of the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind, spirit" and bald "bold, brave".
Downs English
This surname is derived from the Old English element dun meaning "hill, mountain, moor." This denotes someone who lives in a down (in other words, a ridge of chalk hills or elevated rolling grassland).
Iddenden English (Rare)
Iden as a village name is to be found in both the counties of Kent and Sussex, and describes a pasture, or strictly speaking an area within a marsh suitable for pasture. The origination is the pre 6th century phrase ig-denn with ig meaning an island... [more]
Eveleigh English
From an unknown location, possibly from the village of Everleigh in Wiltshire, England (see Everleigh).
Raleigh English
English habitation name in Devon meaning "red woodland clearing".
Tempest English (British)
English (Yorkshire): nickname for someone with a blustery temperament, from Middle English, Old French tempest(e) ‘storm’ (Latin tempestas ‘weather’, ‘season’, a derivative of tempus ‘time’).
Billings English
It comes from the old English bil, meaning "sword or halberd", though the word later came to refer to a pruning hook used to harvest fruit. It's also possible that the name comes from a location in ancient England called Billing, which would've gotten its name from the same source.
Knuckles English
Possibly a nickname for someone with prominent knuckles.
Breed English
Habitational name from any of various minor places, for example Brede in Sussex, named with Old English brǣdu "breadth, broad place" (a derivative of brād "broad").
Wakelin English
From the Anglo-Norman male personal name Walquelin, literally "little Walho", a Germanic nickname meaning literally "foreigner".
Gierc English, Polish
Pronounciation: Rhymes with "pierce." Hard "g" (as in "goat"). ... [more]
Smoker English
Derived from the Old English word "smoc," meaning "smock" or, literally, "woman's undergarment." The name was most likely originally borne by someone who made or sold smocks.
Cawthorne English
Means "person from Cawthorn or Cawthorne", both in Yorkshire ("cold thorn bush").
Ffelan English
Anglisized version of the Gaelic Ó Faoláin meaning "descendent of Faolán", a given name meaning "wolf".
Anna English, Irish, Italian, Hungarian
Probably derived from the female first name Anna.
Bjorklund English (American)
Anglicized form of Swedish Björklund or Norwegian Bjørklund.
Crough English
Variant of Croke
Belmont English
English surname of Norman origin, a variant of the surname Beaumont, which was derived from place names meaning "lovely hill" in Old French (from beu, bel "fair, lovely" and mont "hill").
Posey English, French
Derived from the Greek word "desposyni." The Desposyni is a term referring to a group of people that are allegedly direct blood relatives to Jesus. They are mentioned in Mark 3:21 and Mark 3:31. American actress Parker Posey is a famous bearer.
Marcey English
Variant of Mercer.
Corson English
Nickname from Old French 'corson', a diminutive of curt ‘short’
Sallow English (Rare)
Sallow comes from the medieval word for willow tree. It is a location surname.
Akins Scottish, English, Northern Irish
Variant of Aikens, which is derived from the given name Aiken, a variant of the medieval diminutive Atkin (see Aitken).
Fairey English
Either (i) meant "person from Fairy Farm or Fairyhall", both in Essex (Fairy perhaps "pigsty"); or (ii) from a medieval nickname meaning "beautiful eye". This was borne by Fairey Aviation, a British aircraft company, producer of the biplane fighter-bomber Fairey Swordfish... [more]
Whitby English
English surname which was from either of two place names, that of a port in North Yorkshire (which comes from the Old Norse elements hvítr "white" (or Hvíti, a byname derived from it) combined with býr "farm") or a place in Cheshire (from Old English hwit "white" (i.e., "stone-built") and burh "fortress").
Barrick English
Variation of Barwick.
Yelley English (British)
The surname Yelley was first found in Oxfordshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Saxon influence of English history diminished after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed... [more]
Lemon English, Northern Irish, Scottish
English: from the Middle English personal name Lefman, Old English Leofman, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + mann ‘man’, ‘person’... [more]
De Ath English
Probably a deliberate respelling of Death (i), intended to distance the name from its original signification.
Croslay English
The name is derived from their residence in a region known as the "cross" or "for the dweller at the cross."
Reynoldson English
Means "son of Reynold".
Debby English
"Deep valley" from Old English Dipden.
Holter English, German, Norwegian
Derived from English holt meaning "small wood". A topographic name for someone who lived near a small wooden area, as well as a habitational name from a place named with that element.
Woodnut English
From a rare Anglo-Saxon personal name meaning "bold as Wade" and meant to honor the legendary Germanic sea-giant named Wade.
Eddowes English
Derived from the given name Aldus, a medieval variant of Aldous.
Hiddleston English, Scottish
Habitational name from a place called Huddleston in Yorkshire, England. The place name was derived from the Old English personal name HUDEL.
Barbour English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Occupational name for a barber, one who cuts hair for a living.
Vivis English (Rare)
Found in the 1891, 1901 & 1911 British census, other Ancestry.co.uk records & FreeBMD. Could derive from Vivas from Spanish Catalan
Hookham English
This surname may derive from Old English hóc meaning "hook, angle" and hám meaning "village, hamlet, dwelling."
Padley English
A habitational name from a place named Padley, which was probably named with the Old English personal name Padda and lēah meaning ‘glade, woodland clearing’. Alternatively, the first element may have been padde, meaning ‘toad’.
Charlotte French, English
From the feminine given name Charlotte.
Ralls English (Anglicized, Rare)
From old English or Saxon. Originally Rallf ( Raulf) which meant Wolf Council
Hoadley English
Habitational name from East or West Hoathly in Sussex, so named from Old English hað / Middle English hoath 'heath' + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
Daye English
Variant of Day.
Braham English
From the name of a town called Braham, probably derived from Old English brom meaning "broom (a type of plant)" and ham meaning "home, settlement" or hamm meaning "river meadow".
Landry French, English
From the Germanic personal name Landric, a compound of land "land" and ric "powerful, ruler".
Poppe German, Dutch, English
German and Dutch variant of Popp 1 and English variant of Popp 2.
Lesatz English
Unknown origin (I mean by I don't know its origins). Popular in Michigan during the early 20th century.
Roseland English
Americanized form of Norwegian Røys(e)land; a habitational name from about 30 farmsteads, many in Agder, named from Old Norse reysi ‘heap of stones’ + land ‘land’, ‘farmstead’.
Dickerman English, German, Jewish
Possibly derived from Middle High German dic(ke) "strong, thick" and Mann "man, male, husband".
Northrup English (?)
Variant of Northrop
Ismay English
Matronymic surname from the medieval given name Ismay.
Hopkinson English
Means "son of Hopkin"
Cavill English
Derived from Cavil, a place located in the East Riding of Yorkshire, Northern England, named from Old English ca meaning "jackdaw" and feld meaning "open country".
Thomison English
A Variant of Thompson, meaning "Son of Thomas".
Compton English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places throughout England (but especially in the south) named Compton, from Old English cumb meaning "short, straight valley" + tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
Hamson English
A variant of Hampson.
Pettis English
From the possessive or plural form of Middle English pytte, pitte ‘pit’, ‘hollow’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a pit, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Pett in East Sussex.
Hoerman English, German
Variant of Herman. Variant of Hörmann.
Brierley English
Originally derived from place names meaning "briar clearing", from a combination of Old English brær (meanin "briar") and leah.
Taunton English
Habitational name from Taunton in Somerset, Taunton Farm in Coulsdon, Surrey, or Tanton in North Yorkshire. The Somerset place name was originally a combination of a Celtic river name (now the Tone, possibly meaning ‘roaring stream’) + Old English tūn ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
Eyre English
Derived from Middle English eyer, eir "heir", originally denoting a man who was designated to inherit or had already inherited the main property in a particular locality. The surname was borne by the heroine of Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre' (1847).
Scarr English
Derived from the word ‘skjarr’ meaning a rocky outcrop / hill
Fray French, English
From the German surname Frey or the Old French given name FRAY.
Trotter English, Scottish, German
Northern English and Scottish: occupational name for a messenger, from an agent derivative of Middle English trot(en) 'to walk fast' (Old French troter, of Germanic origin). ... [more]
Jenkin English
From the given name Jenkin
Pettinger English
English version of Pottinger.
Naismith English
Means either "nail-maker" (from Old English nægelsmith) or "knife-maker" (from Old English cnīfsmith).
Zalick English
Comes from the Greek surname Tsalikis.
Claeson English
Means "Son of Claes". Possibly an English phonetic elaboration of Clayton, but also a Swedish variant of Claesson.
Pinckney English
The surname Pinckney originally denoted someone from Picquigny, France, which derives from a Germanic personal name, Pincino (of obscure derivation) and the Latin locative suffix -acum... [more]
Person English
Americanised version of Persson.
Grosvenor English
English surname of Norman origin meaning ‘the master huntsman’. Derived from Le Grand Veneur, this title was held by Hugh d'Avranches who accompanied William the Conqueror in the Norman invasion of England in 1066.
Voit English
A famous bearer of This surname is Angelina Jolie 's father and actor John Voit.
Drewery English
Variant of Drury.
Hogg English
An occupational name for someone who herded swine.
Ballaster English
Meant "person who makes or is armed with a crossbow" (from a derivative of Middle English baleste "crossbow", from Old French).
Kox English
Variant of Cox
Apple English
From Middle English appel meaning "apple" (Old English æppel). An occupational name for a grower or seller of apples.
Rodrick English
Derived from the given name Roderick.
Care English
Occupational name for a locksmith, Middle English keyere, kayer, an agent derivative of keye.
Clutterbuck English, Dutch (Anglicized, ?)
English surname of unknown origin, possibly a corrupted form of a Dutch surname derived from Dutch klateren "to clatter" and beek "brook". The original surname may have been brought to England by Flemish weavers whom Edward III brought to England in the 14th century to teach their techniques to the English, or by Huguenots who fled the Netherlands in the 16th century to escape religious persecution... [more]
Aliston English
Variant of Allerston, a habitational surname derived from a place so named in North Yorkshire.
Angelson English
Means son of Angel.
Larter English
From the old Teutonic word 'lahtro' which is to do with a place that animals bear their young. This was modifed in several dialects to be 'lahtre', 'lattr', 'lauchter' and 'lawchter'. ... [more]
Atmore English
Locational surname derived from Middle English atte more meaning "at the marsh".
Applegate English
Extremely common variant of Applegarth, in which the less familiar final element has been assimilated to the northern Middle English word gate meaning "road" or to modern English gate.
Pitcher English, German
From an agent derivative of Middle English pich ‘pitch’, hence an occupational name for a caulker, one who sealed the seams of ships or barrels with pitch. English variant of Pickard... [more]
Kingswood English
Means “King’s wood.”
Harnden English
From an English village Harrowden in Bedfordshire. This place name literally means "hill of the heathen shrines or temples," from the Old English words hearg and dun.
Dayne English
Variant of Dane.
Mobley English
English reduced form of Moberley.
Osmar English
Variant of Hosmer.
Goodall English
Habitational name from Gowdall in East Yorkshire, named from Old English golde "marigold" and Old English halh "nook, recess".
Norrell English, German (?)
A locational surname from the Germanic (Old English/Old Norse) term for the north. It either refers to someone who lived in a location called Northwell, lived north of a well, spring or stream (Old English weall)... [more]
Mowers Scottish, English
English: variant of Mower
Cutter English
This surname is derived from an occupation. 'the cutter,' i.e. cloth-cutter
Cant English
Means "singer in a chantry chapel", or from a medieval nickname for someone who was continually singing (in either case from Old Northern French cant "song").
Boss English
From an originally French term meaning "hunchback".
Longyear English
Meaning uncertain.
Leah English
It means "clearing".
Shawe English
Variant of Shaw.
Loud English
from the English word "loud", given to a loud or, in jest, quiet person