Pronunciation Guide

What follows are the sounds used in the name pronunciations on this site. Please note that not all names have yet been assigned a pronunciation. Also note that all of this is only intended to be a rough guide. Pronunciations in different dialects (as in British and American English) can vary considerably.

Dashes are used to separate syllables. Stressed syllables are written in CAPITALS. Note that in English, the vowel in an unstressed syllable often undergoes a reduction, causing it to be spoken much like the U in the list below.

SymbolExample
Bbed
CHcheek (tsh)
Ddam
DHthen
Ffake
Ggive
GHScottish laghail
Hhen
Jjump (dzh)
Kcat
KHScottish loch
Llamp
Mmaze
Nnot
NGfling, sink
Ppain
Rright *
Sside
SHshine
Ttop
THthin
Vvery
Wwater
Yyeti
Zzebra
ZHazure, vision

* R is used to represent several different r-like sounds. For further clarification, the following may be used:

SymbolExample
RHFrench riche (guttural R)
RRSpanish rojo (trilled R)
Spanish caro (tapped R)
               
SymbolExample
Abat, can
AHpot, con **
AWbought, sawn **
AYbait, cane
Ebet, care
EEbeet, keen
Ibit, kin
IEbite, kind
Oboat, cone
OIboy, coin
OOboot, soon
OWbout, gown
Ubut, sun
UIDutch huis
UUFrench feu
UWput, took
UYFrench rue
əabout (schwa)

** Many English speakers pronounce AH and AW the same
 
SymbolExplanation
:preceding vowel is long (drawn out)
guttural fricative
glottal stop
Hpreceding consonant is aspirated
Npreceding vowel is nasalized
Tepenthetic t
əfollowing consonant is syllabic

The four letters above should appear smaller and raised. Example: the T in DANTS (dance).