Surnames Categorized "Family Affair characters"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include Family Affair characters.
usage
Ainsley Scottish
From a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Allen English, Scottish
Derived from the given name Alan.
Archer English
Occupational name for one who practiced archery, from Latin arcus "bow" (via Old French).
Beasley English
From the name of a place in Lancashire, from Old English beos "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Bradley English
From a common English place name, derived from brad "broad" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Brennan Irish
From Irish Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán", a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
Brooks English
Variant of Brook.
Brown English
Originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin. A notable bearer is Charlie Brown from the Peanuts comic strip by Charles Schulz.
Bryant English
From the given name Brian.
Burgess English
From Middle English and Old French burgeis meaning "city-dweller", ultimately from Frankish burg "fortress".
Callahan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Ceallacháin meaning "descendant of Cellachán".
Chang Chinese
Alternate transcription of Chinese (see Zhang).
Chen Chinese
From Chinese (chén) meaning "exhibit, display, old, ancient" and also referring to the former state of Chen, which existed in what is now Henan province from the 11th to 5th centuries BC.
Davis English, Scottish
Means "son of David". This was the surname of the revolutionary jazz trumpet player Miles Davis (1926-1991).
Evans Welsh
Means "son of Evan".
Fox English
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
González Spanish
Means "son of Gonzalo" in Spanish. This is among the most common surnames in Spain.
Green English
Descriptive name for someone who often wore the colour green or someone who lived near the village green.
Griffin 1 Welsh
Derived from the given name Gruffudd.
Hayden 1 English
From place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
Higgins Irish
From Irish Ó hUiginn meaning "descendant of Uiginn". Uiginn is a byname meaning "Viking".
Hill English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a hill, derived from Old English hyll.
Hobson English
Means "son of Hob".
Hunter English, Scottish
Occupational name that referred to someone who hunted for a living, from Old English hunta.
Jackson English
Means "son of Jack". Famous bearers of this name are the American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) and the singer Michael Jackson (1958-2009).
James English
Derived from the given name James.
Jones English, Welsh
Derived from the given name Jon, a medieval variant of John.
Lee 1 English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a leah, Old English meaning "woodland, clearing".
Liang Chinese
From Chinese (liáng) referring to the ancient state of Liang, which existed from the 8th to 7th centuries BC in what is now Shaanxi province.
Lin Chinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest".
London English
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain.
Madden Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Madaidhín.
Mariani Italian
From the given name Mariano.
Marley English
Originally denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in Britain called Marley, ultimately meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. One of the main characters in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol (1843) bears this surname.
Marshall English
Derived from Middle English mareschal "marshal", from Latin mariscalcus, ultimately from Germanic roots akin to Old High German marah "horse" and scalc "servant". It originally referred to someone who took care of horses.
Martin English, French, German, Swedish
Derived from the given name Martin. This is the most common surname in France.
Mason English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, of Frankish origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
McAlister Scottish, Irish
From Scottish Gaelic MacAlastair or Irish Gaelic Mac Alastair meaning "son of Alistair".
McGovern Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mag Shamhradháin meaning "son of Samhradháin", a given name meaning "summer".
Melville Scottish
From the place name Malleville meaning "bad town" in Norman French.
Michaels English
Derived from the given name Michael.
Morrison English
Means "son of Morris".
Mullen Irish
From the Irish Ó Maoláin meaning "descendant of Maolán". The given name Maolán meant "devotee, servant, tonsured one".
Nelson 1 English
Means "son of Neil". This name was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805).
Ng 1 Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Wu 1.
Parker English
Means "keeper of the park" in Middle English. It is an occupational name for a person who was a gamekeeper at a medieval park.
Peters English, German, Dutch
Means "son of Peter".
Reid Scottish
Scots variant of Read 1.
Robinson English
Means "son of Robin".
Russell English
From a Norman French nickname that meant "little red one", perhaps originally describing a person with red hair.
Ryan Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Riain, or else a simplified form of Mulryan.
Ryder English
Occupational name for a mounted warrior, from Old English ridere meaning "rider".
Sanderson English
Means "son of Alexander".
Smith English
Means "metalworker, blacksmith" from Old English smiþ, related to smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world. A famous bearer was the Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).
Spencer English
Occupational name for a person who dispensed provisions to those who worked at a manor, derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry".
Stone English
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or worked with stone, derived from Old English stan.
Terrell English
Probably derived from the Norman French nickname tirel meaning "to pull", referring to a stubborn person.
Thompson English
Means "son of Thomas".
Turner English
Occupational name for one who worked with a lathe, derived from Old English turnian "to turn", of Latin origin. A famous bearer is the American musician Tina Turner (1939-2023), born Anna Mae Bullock.
Van Buren Dutch
Means "from Buren", a small town on the island of Ameland in the north of the Netherlands, as well as a small city in the Dutch province Gelderland. The place names derive from Old Dutch bur meaning "house, dwelling". In the 16th century the countess Anna van Buren married William of Orange, the founder of the Dutch royal family. A famous bearer of this surname was Martin van Buren (1782-1862), the eighth President of the United States.
Warren 1 English
Denoted a person who lived near a warren, from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure" (of Germanic origin).
Wells English
Derived from Middle English wille meaning "well, spring, water hole".
West English, German
Denoted a person who lived to the west of something, or who came from the west.
Williams English
Means "son of William".
Wilson English
Means "son of Will". A famous bearer was the American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
Wong 1 Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Wang 1.