Surnames Categorized "compound names"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include compound names.
usage
Allaway Scottish
From a Scottish place name, itself derived from alla "wild" and mhagh "field".
Appleby English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English æppel "apple" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
Appleton English
From the name of several English towns, meaning "orchard" in Old English (a compound of æppel "apple" and tun "enclosure, yard").
Armstrong English
Means "strong arm" from Middle English. Tradition holds that the family is descended from Siward, an 11th-century Earl of Northumbria. Famous bearers of this name include the Americans Louis Armstrong (1901-1971), a jazz musician, and Neil Armstrong (1930-2012), an astronaut who was the first person to walk on the moon.
Ashworth English
From an English place name meaning "ash enclosure" in Old English.
Atwater English
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the water".
Atwood English
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the wood".
Badcock English
From a diminutive of the medieval given name Bada.
Barton English
From a place name meaning "barley town" in Old English.
Bergman Swedish
From Swedish berg meaning "mountain" and man (Old Norse maðr) meaning "man", originally a name for a person living on a mountain.
Blackburn English
From the name of a city in Lancashire, meaning "black stream" in Old English.
Blackman English
From a nickname, a variant of Black.
Blackwood English, Scottish
From an English place name meaning "black wood".
Bloodworth English
Originally indicated someone from the town of Blidworth in Nottinghamshire, which was derived from the Old English byname Blīþa (meaning "happy, blithe") combined with worð "enclosure".
Boatwright English
Occupational name meaning "maker of boats".
Bowman English
Occupational name for an archer, derived from Middle English bowe, Old English boga meaning "bow".
Brownlow English
From Old English brun meaning "brown" and hlaw meaning "mound, small hill". The name was probably given to a family living on a small hill covered with bracken.
Burnham English
From the name of various towns in England, typically derived from Old English burna "stream, spring" and ham "home, settlement".
Campbell Scottish
From a Gaelic nickname cam beul meaning "wry or crooked mouth". The surname was later represented in Latin documents as de bello campo meaning "of the fair field".
Carman 1 English
Occupational name for a carter, from Middle English carre "cart" (of Latin origin) and man "man".
Carman 2 English
From an Old Norse byname derived from karlmann meaning "male, man".
Clayton English
From the name of various places meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
Cockburn Scottish, English
Originally indicated someone who came from Cockburn, a place in Berwickshire. The place name is derived from Old English cocc "rooster" and burna "stream".
Cookson English
Patronymic form of Cook.
Cowden English
From various English place names, which meaning either "coal valley", "coal hill" or "cow pasture" in Old English.
Cunningham 2 Irish
From Irish Ó Cuinneagáin meaning "descendant of Cuinneagán", a diminutive of Conn.
Denman English
From Middle English dene "valley" combined with man.
Fairburn English
From a place name meaning "fern stream", from Old English fearn "fern" and burna "stream".
Fairchild English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English.
Fishman English
Occupational name for a fisherman.
Flintstone Popular Culture
From the English words flint and stone, created by Hanna-Barbera Productions for the caveman family (Fred, Wilma and Pebbles) in their animated television show The Flintstones, which ran from 1960 to 1966.
Freeman English
Referred to a person who was born free, or in other words was not a serf.
Garland English
Means "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. It originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
Gladwin English
Derived from the Old English given name Glædwine.
Goodman English
Variant of Good.
Grayson English
Means "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
Greenberg German, Jewish
Anglicized form of Grünberg.
Greenspan Jewish
Anglicized form of German Grünspan meaning "verdigris". Verdigris is the green-blue substance that forms on copper.
Greenwood English
Topographic name for someone who lived in or near a lush forest, from Old English grene "green" and wudu "wood".
Hardwick English
From Old English heord "herd" and wīc "village, town".
Hayden 1 English
From place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
Hayden 2 Irish
Anglicized form of Ó hÉideáin or Ó hÉidín.
Haywood English
From various place names meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
Heyman Jewish
From the given name Chayyim.
Hightower English
Possibly a variant of Hayter.
Homewood English
From various place names derived from Old English ham meaning "home" and wudu meaning "wood".
Layton English
Derived from the name of English towns, meaning "town with a leek garden" in Old English.
Lockwood English
From an English place name meaning "enclosed wood".
Longstaff English
Occupational name for an official who was equipped with a ceremonial staff, or a nickname for a tall person.
Maxwell Scottish
From a place name meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name Magnus, combined with Old English wille "well, stream". A famous bearer was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.
Newman English
English cognate of Neumann.
Newport English
Given to one who came from the town of Newport (which means simply "new port"), which was the name of several English towns.
Newton English
From the name of one of many English towns meaning "new town". A famous bearer was the English physicist Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727).
Offermans Dutch
From Dutch offer meaning "offering, donation", referring to a person who collected money in a church.
Outlaw English
Means simply "outlaw" from Middle English outlawe.
Overton English
Denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in England called Overton, meaning "upper settlement" or "riverbank settlement" in Old English.
Patton English, Scottish
Diminutive of the medieval name Pate, a short form of Patrick.
Peacock English
From Middle English pecok meaning "peacock". It was originally a nickname for a proud or haughty person.
Radcliff English
From various place names in England that mean "red cliff" in Old English.
Sandberg Swedish, Norwegian, Jewish
From Swedish and Norwegian sand (Old Norse sandr) meaning "sand" and berg meaning "mountain" (or in the case of the Jewish surname, from the Yiddish or German cognates).
Sanderson English
Means "son of Alexander".
Sandford English
Indicated a person from Sandford, England, which means simply "sand ford".
Sandoval Spanish
Derived from the name of a town in Spain, ultimately from Latin saltus "forest, glade" and novalis "unploughed land".
Sexton English
Occupational name for a sexton (Middle English sexteyn), a caretaker for a church or graveyard.
Thornton English
From any of the various places in England by this name, meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
Tipton English
Originally given to one who came from the town of Tipton, derived from the Old English given name Tippa combined with tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Turnbull English, Scottish
Nickname for someone thought to be strong enough to turn around a bull.
Underhill English
Means "dweller at the foot of a hill", from Old English under and hyll.
Underwood English
Means "dweller at the edge of the woods", from Old English under and wudu.
Upton English
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many towns in England bearing this name. The place name itself is derived from Old English upp "up" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Warwick English
From the name of an English town, itself derived from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wīc "village, town".
Washington English
From a place name meaning "settlement belonging to Wassa's people", from the given name Wassa and Old English tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town". A famous bearer was George Washington (1732-1799), the first president of the United States. This surname was sometimes adopted by freed slaves, resulting in a high proportion of African-American bearers.
Waterman 1 English
Means "servant of Walter".
Waterman 2 English, Dutch
Occupational name for a boatman or a water carrier. It could also describe a person who lived by water.
Wickham English
From any of various towns by this name in England, notably in Hampshire. They are derived from Old English wīc "village, town" (of Latin origin) and ham "home, settlement".
Winship English
Possibly denoted a person who came from Wincheap Street in Canterbury, England. It is uncertain origin, possibly meaning "wine market" in Old English.
Winston English
Derived from the given name Wynnstan.
Witherspoon English
Originally given to a person who dwelt near a sheep enclosure, from Middle English wether "sheep" and spong "strip of land".
Woodham English
Indicated a person who had a home near a wood, derived from Old English wudu "wood" and ham "home, settlement".
Wortham English
Derived from the name of a town in Suffolk, England meaning "enclosed homestead".