Surnames Categorized "youth"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include youth.
usage
Bachchan Indian, Hindi
From Hindi बच्चा (bachcha) meaning "child", a word of Persian origin. This surname was adopted by the Indian poet Harivansh Rai Srivastava (1907-2003).
Caruso Italian
Means "close-cropped hair" in Italian, also having the secondary sense "boy, young man".
De Jong Dutch
Means "young" in Dutch, from Middle Dutch jonc. This is the most common surname in the Netherlands.
Fairbairn Scottish, English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English and Scots.
Fairchild English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English.
Frisk Swedish
From Swedish frisk "healthy", which was derived from the Middle Low German word vrisch "fresh, young, frisky".
Hogan Irish
From Irish Ó hÓgáin meaning "descendant of Ógán". The given name Ógán is a diminutive of óg meaning "young".
Jonker Dutch
From the Dutch title jonkheer meaning "young lord". It was originally a medieval noble designation (not an actual title) for a young nobleman.
Jung 1 German
Means "young" in German, from Middle High German junc.
Kaneko Japanese
From Japanese (kane) meaning "gold, metal, money" and (ko) meaning "child".
Kidd English
From a nickname meaning "young goat, kid" in Middle English, of Old Norse origin.
Page English, French
Occupational name meaning "servant, page". It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδίον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
Piccirillo Italian
From Neapolitan piccerillo meaning "small, young".
Tosi Italian
Means "clean-shaven", usually denoting a younger man, from Latin tonsus "shaved".
Virgo English
Possibly from Latin virgo "virgin, maiden". It may have been a nickname for an actor who played the Virgin Mary in mystery plays, or for a shy man or a lecher.
Young English
Derived from Old English geong meaning "young". This was a descriptive name to distinguish father from son.
Ziskind Jewish
Ornamental name meaning "sweet child", from Yiddish זיס (zis) meaning "sweet" and קינד (kind) meaning "child", both words of Old High German origin.