Surnames Categorized "bass guitarists"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include bass guitarists.
usage
Albuquerque Portuguese
From the name of the Spanish town of Alburquerque, near the Portuguese border in the province of Badajoz. It is probably derived from Latin alba quercus meaning "white oak".
Andersson Swedish
Means "son of Anders". This is the most common surname in Sweden.
Black English
Means either "black" (from Old English blæc) or "pale" (from Old English blac). It could refer to a person with a pale or a dark complexion, or a person who worked with black dye.
Burton English
From a common English place name, derived from Old English meaning "fortified town".
Butler English, Irish
Occupational name derived from Norman French butiller "wine steward", ultimately from Late Latin butticula "bottle". A famous bearer of this surname is the fictional character Rhett Butler, created by Margaret Mitchell for her novel Gone with the Wind (1936).
Chancellor English
Occupational name for an administrator, a chancellor, from Norman French chancelier.
Chandler English
Occupational name meaning "candle seller" or "candle maker" in Middle English, ultimately derived from Old French.
Clayton English
From the name of various places meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
Cook English
Derived from Old English coc meaning "cook", ultimately from Latin coquus. It was an occupational name for a cook, a man who sold cooked meats, or a keeper of an eating house.
Craig Scottish
Derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag, rocks, outcrop", originally belonging to a person who lived near a crag.
Deacon English
Means "deacon", ultimately from Greek διάκονος (diakonos) meaning "servant".
Douglas Scottish
From the name of a town in Lanarkshire, itself named after a tributary of the River Clyde called the Douglas Water, derived from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). This was a Scottish Lowland clan, the leaders of which were powerful earls in the medieval period.
Elizondo Spanish
Originally referred to a person who lived close to a church, from Basque eleiza "church" and ondo "near".
Ellis English, Welsh
Derived from the given name Elijah, or sometimes Elisedd.
Fairclough English
From a place name meaning "fair ravine, fair cliff" in Old English.
Finch English, Literature
From the name of the bird, from Old English finc. It was used by Harper Lee for the surname of lawyer Atticus Finch and his children in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960).
Flanagan Irish
From Irish Ó Flannagáin meaning "descendant of Flannagán". Flannagán is a given name meaning "blood red". From County Roscommon in Ireland, it has many other spellings.
Furukawa Japanese
From Japanese (furu) meaning "old" and (kawa) or (kawa) both meaning "river, stream".
Goodwin English
Derived from the given name Godwine.
Gordon Scottish
From the name of a place in Berwickshire, Scotland, derived from Brythonic words meaning "spacious fort".
Greenwood English
Topographic name for someone who lived in or near a lush forest, from Old English grene "green" and wudu "wood".
Hart English
Means "male deer". It was originally acquired by a person who lived in a place frequented by harts, or bore some resemblance to a hart.
Hill English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a hill, derived from Old English hyll.
Hopper English
Occupational name for an acrobat or a nickname for someone who was nervous or restless. A famous bearer was the American actor Dennis Hopper (1936-2010).
Horn English, German, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old English, Old High German and Old Norse word horn meaning "horn". This was an occupational name for one who carved objects out of horn or who played a horn, or a person who lived near a horn-shaped geographical feature, such as a mountain or a bend in a river.
Hughes 1 English
Patronymic of the given name Hugh.
Irwin English
Derived from the Old English given name Eoforwine.
Isaksson Swedish
Means "son of Isak".
Jenkins English
From the given name Jenkin, a diminutive of Jen, itself a Middle English form of John.
Jensen Danish, Norwegian
Means "son of Jens". This is the most common surname in Denmark.
Johnson English
Means "son of John". Famous bearers include American presidents Andrew Johnson (1808-1875) and Lyndon B. Johnson (1908-1973).
Jones English, Welsh
Derived from the given name Jon, a medieval variant of John.
Kawaguchi Japanese
Means "mouth of the river", from Japanese (kawa) meaning "river, stream" and (kuchi) meaning "mouth, entrance".
Knight English
From Old English cniht meaning "knight", a tenant serving as a mounted soldier.
Lynch Irish
From Irish Ó Loingsigh meaning "descendant of Loingseach", a given name meaning "mariner".
Mason English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, of Frankish origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
Merrick Welsh
Derived from the given name Meurig.
Meyers German, English
Patronymic form of Meyer 1, Mayer 3 or Myer.
Mills English
Originally given to one who lived near a mill or who worked in a mill, from Middle English mille.
Morrison English
Means "son of Morris".
Morton English
Derived from a place name meaning "moor town" in Old English.
Murdock Irish
Derived from the given name Murchadh.
Murray 1 Scottish
Derived from the region in Scotland called Moray (Gaelic Moireabh), possibly of Pictish origin, meaning "seashore, coast". A notable bearer of this surname was General James Murray (1721-1794), who was the first British Governor-General of Canada.
Nelson 1 English
Means "son of Neil". This name was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805).
Nielsen Danish
Means "son of Niels 1".
Niles English
Means "son of Neil".
O'Brien Irish
From the Irish Ó Briain meaning "descendant of Brian".
O'Hearn Irish
Anglicized form of Ó hEachthighearna.
O'Malley Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Máille.
O'Shea Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Séaghdha.
Owen Welsh
From the Welsh given name Owain.
Parsons English
Originally denoted a son of a parson, a derivative of Latin persona "person".
Porter English
Occupational name meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
Putnam English
From Puttenham, the name of towns in Hertfordshire and Surrey in England, which mean "Putta's homestead".
Quinn Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of Conn".
Reeves English
Variant of Reeve.
Rogers English
Derived from the given name Roger.
Ross English, Scottish
From various place names (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), which are derived from Scottish Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland".
Rutherford Scottish
From the name of places in southern Scotland and northern England, derived from Old English hriðer meaning "cattle, ox" and ford meaning "ford, river crossing".
Savage English
English nickname meaning "wild, uncouth", derived from Old French salvage or sauvage meaning "untamed", ultimately from Latin silvaticus meaning "wild, from the woods".
Simmons English
Derived from the given name Simon 1.
Tanaka Japanese
Means "dweller in the rice fields", from Japanese (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy" and (naka) meaning "middle".
Taylor English
Derived from Old French tailleur meaning "tailor", ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut".
Waters 1 English
Originally given to a person who lived near the water.
Williams English
Means "son of William".
Wilson English
Means "son of Will". A famous bearer was the American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
Wyman English
From the Old English given name Wigmund.
Yamada Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Yamamoto Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
Yamauchi Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (uchi) meaning "inside".
York English
From the name of the English city of York, which was originally called Eburacon (Latinized as Eboracum), meaning "yew" in Brythonic. In the Anglo-Saxon period it was corrupted to Eoforwic, based on Old English eofor "boar" and wic "village". This was rendered as Jórvík by the Vikings and eventually reduced to York.
Zabala Basque
Originally denoted someone who lived in a place of this name in Biscay. It is derived from Basque zabal meaning "large, wide".