English Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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COREY     English
Derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning.
CORNELL     English
Derived from the given name CORNELIUS.
CORNETT     English
Derived from Old French cornet meaning "horn", referring to one who worked as a horn blower.
CORWIN     English
Derived from Old French cordoan "leather", ultimately from the name of the Spanish city of Cordova.
CORY     English
Variant of COREY.
COTTERILL     English
Derived from Middle English cotter meaning "cottager", referring to a small tenant farmer.
COUPE     English
From Middle English coupe meaning "barrel", a name for a barrel maker or cooper.
COURTENAY (1)     English
From the name of towns in France which were originally derivatives of the Gallo-Roman personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short".
COURTENAY (2)     English
From the Old French nickname court nes meaning "short nose".
COWDEN     English
From various English place names, which meaning either "coal valley", "coal hill" or "cow pasture" in Old English.
COX     English
Patronymic form of COCK.
COY     English
Means "quiet, shy, coy" from Middle English coi.
CRAWFORD     English
From a place name derived from Old English crawa "crow" and ford "river crossing".
CREWE     English
Originally denoted someone from Crewe in Cheshire, which is from Welsh criu "weir, dam, fish trap".
CRISP     English
English cognate of CRESPO.
CROFT     English
From Old English croft meaning "enclosed field".
CROPPER     English
Occupational name derived from Middle English croppe "crop", referring to a fruit picker or a crop reaper.
CROSS     English
Locative name meaning "cross", ultimately from Latin crux. It denoted one who lived near a cross symbol or near a crossroads.
CROUCH     English
Variant of CROSS.
CULLEN (1)     English
From the name of the German city of Cologne, which was derived from Latin colonia "colony".
CUMMINS     English, Scottish, Irish
From an Old Breton given name, a cognate of CUIMÍN, introduced to Britain at the time of the Norman Conquest.
CURTIS     English
Nickname for a courteous person from Old French curteis meaning "refined".
DABNEY     English
Variant of DAUBNEY.
DALE     English
From Old English dæl meaning "valley", originally indicating a person who lived there.
DALTON     English
Derived from a place name which meant "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the English chemist and physicist John Dalton (1766-1844).
DANE (1)     English
Variant of DEAN (1) or DEAN (2).
DANE (2)     English
Originally denoted a Dane, that is a person from Denmark.
DANELL     English
Derived from the given name DANIEL.
DANIEL     English, French, German, Portuguese
Derived from the given name DANIEL.
DANIELL     English
Derived from the given name DANIEL.
DANIELS     English
Variant of DANIEL.
DANIELSON     English
Means "son of DANIEL".
DANNEL     English
Variant of DANIEL.
DANNIEL     English
Variant of DANIEL.
DANNIELL     English
Variant of DANIEL.
DARBY     English
From the name of the town Derby meaning "deer farm" in Old Norse.
DARRELL     English
Originally denoted one who came from the town of Airel in Normandy, derived from Late Latin arealis meaning "open space".
DARWIN     English
From the given name DEORWINE.
DAUBNEY     English
From any of the various towns in France called Aubigny, derived from the Gallo-Roman personal name ALBINUS.
DAVID     English, French, Scottish, Czech, Portuguese, Jewish
From the given name DAVID.
DAVIDS     English
Means "son of DAVID".
DAVIDSON     English
Means "son of DAVID".
DAVIES     English, Scottish
Variant of DAVIS.
DAVIS     English, Scottish
Means "son of DAVID". This was the surname of the revolutionary jazz trumpet player Miles Davis (1926-1991).
DAVISON     English
Means "son of DAVID".
DAWSON     English
Means "son of DAW".
DAY     English
From a diminutive form of DAVID.
DEADMAN     English
Variant of DEBENHAM.
DEAN (1)     English
Derived from Middle English dene meaning "valley".
DEAN (2)     English
Occupational surname meaning "dean", referring to a person who either was a dean or worked for one. It is from Middle English deen (ultimately from Latin decanus meaning "chief of ten").
DEBENHAM     English
Originally denoted a person from the town of Debenham in Suffolk, derived from the name of the River Deben (meaning "deep" in Old English) combined with ham meaning "home,homestead".
DEDRICK     English
Derived from the given name Dederick, an older form of DEREK.
DEERING     English
From the Old English given name Deora meaning "dear, beloved".
DELANEY (1)     English
Derived from Norman French de l'aunaie meaning "from the alder grove".
DENMAN     English
From Middle English dene "valley" combined with man.
DENNELL     English
Variant of DANIEL.
DENZIL     English
From the place name Denzell, a manor in Cornwall, which is of unknown meaning.
DERBY     English
Variant of DARBY.
DERRICK     English
Derived from the given name Derrick (see DEREK). A famous bearer of this surname is the character Stephan Derrick from the German television series 'Derrick' (1974-1998).
DERRICKS     English
Derived from the given name DERRICK.
DERRICKSON     English
Means "son of DERRICK".
DEVEREUX     English
Indicated a person from Evreux in France, itself named after the Gaulish tribe of the Eburovices, which was probably derived from a Celtic word meaning "yew".
DEVIN (2)     English
Nickname for a person who acted divinely, from Old French devin "divine", ultimately from Latin.
DEVINE (2)     English
Variant of DEVIN (2).
DEXTER     English
Occupational name meaning "dyer" in Old English (orginally this was a feminine word, but it was later applied to men as well).
DICK     English
From the given name DICK (1).
DICKENS     English
From the medieval given name Dicun, a medieval diminutive of DICK (1). A famous bearer of this surname was the English writer Charles Dickens (1812-1870).
DICKENSON     English
Variant of DICKINSON.
DICKINSON     English
Means "son of Dicun", Dicun being a medieval diminutive of DICK (1). American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) was a famous bearer.
DICKMAN     English
From Old English dic "ditch" combined with man "man". It was originally a name for a ditch digger or someone who lived near a ditch.
DICKSON     English
Means "son of DICK (1)".
DISNEY     English
Means "from Isigny", referring to the town of Isigny in Normandy.
DIXON     English
Means "DICK (1)'s son".
DOCTOR     English
Originally denoted someone who was a doctor, ultimately from Latin doctor meaning "teacher".
DONALDS     English
Derived from the given name DONALD.
DONALDSON     English
Means "son of DONALD".
DORSEY     English
Means "from Orsay", referring to the town of Orsay near Paris, its name deriving from the Latin personal name Orcius.
DOWNER     English
Name for someone who lived on or near a down, which an English word meaning "hill".
DRAKE     English
Derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent".
DRAPER     English
Occupational name for a maker or seller of woolen cloth, from Anglo-Norman French draper (Old French drapier, an agent derivative of drap "cloth").
DUDLEY     English
From a place name meaning "DUDDA's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
DUKE     English
From the noble title, which was originally from Latin dux "leader". It was an occupational surname for a person who behaved like a duke, or who worked in a duke's household.
DUKES     English
Patronymic form of DUKE.
DUNN     English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from Old English dunn "dark" or Gaelic donn "brown", referring to hair colour or complexion.
DURAND     French, English
From Old French durant meaning "enduring", ultimately from Latin durans. This was a nickname for a stubborn person.
DURANT     English, French
Variation of DURAND.
DUSTIN     English
From the Old Norse given name ÞÓRSTEINN.
DWERRYHOUSE     English
Indicated a person who worked or lived at a dye-house, which is a place where dyeing was done.
DWIGHT     English
From the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of DIONYSIUS.
DYER     English
Occupational name for a cloth dyer, from Old English deah "dye".
DYSON     English
Means "son of DYE".
EADS     English
Means "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM".
EARL     English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl meaning "nobleman, warrior". It was either a nickname for one who acted like an earl, or an occupational name for a person employed by an earl.
EARLS     English
Patronymic form of EARL.
EASOM     English
Variant of EADS.
EASON     English
Variant of EADS.
EASTON     English
From the name of various places meaning "east town" in Old English.
EATON     English
From any of the various English towns with this name, derived from Old English ea "river" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
ECCLESTON     English
Denoted a person from any of the various places named Eccleston in England, derived from Latin ecclesia "church" (via Briton) and Old English tun "enclosure, yard, town".
ECCLESTONE     English
Variant of ECCLESTON.
EDGAR     English
Derived from the given name EDGAR.
EDISON     English
Means "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM". The surname was borne by American inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
EDWARDS     English
Means "son of EDWARD".
EDWARDSON     English
Means "son of EDWARD".
ELDER     English
Derived from Old English ealdra meaning "older", used to distinguish two people who had the same name.
ELDRED     English
From the given name EALDRÆD.
ELDRIDGE     English
Derived from the given name ALDRIC.
ELIOT     English
Variant of ELLIOTT.
ELIOTT     English
Variant of ELLIOTT.
ELLERY     English
From the medieval masculine name HILARY.
ELLIOT     English
Variant of ELLIOTT.
ELLIOTT     English
Derived from a diminutive of the given name ELIAS.
ELLIS     English, Welsh
Derived from the given name ELIJAH, or sometimes ELISEDD.
ELLISON     English
Patronymic form of the English name Ellis, from the medieval given name Elis, a vernacular form of ELIJAH.
ELLISSON     English
Variant of ELLISON.
ELLISTON     English
Variant of ELLISON.
ELLSWORTH     English
Habitational name for a person from the town of Elsworth in Cambridgeshire. The town's name is derived from the masculine given name Ella (a short form of Old English names beginning with the elements ælf meaning "elf" or eald meaning "old") combined with worþ meaning "enclosure".
ELMER     English
Derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR.
ELVIS     English
Variant of ELWES.
ELWES     English
Derived from the given name ELOISE.
ELWIN     English
Variant of ELWYN.
ELWYN     English
Derived from the given names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE.
ELY     English
From the name of a town in eastern England meaning "eel district".
EMERSON     English
Means "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
EMMET     English
Variant of EMMETT. This name was borne by the Irish nationalist Robert Emmet (1778-1803).
EMMETT     English
Derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.
ENDICOTT     English
Topographic name derived from Old English meaning "from the end cottage".
ENGLISH     English
Denoted a person who was of English heritage. It was used to distinguish people who lived in border areas (for example, near Wales or Scotland). It was also used to distinguish an Anglo-Saxon from a Norman.
ERICKSON     English
Means "son of ERIC".
ERICSON     English, Swedish
Means "son of ERIC".
EUSTIS     English
Derived from the given name EUSTACE.
EVANSON     English
Means "son of EVAN".
EVELYN     English
Derived from the given name AVELINE.
EVERED     English
From the given name EVERARD.
EVERETT     English
From the given name EVERARD.
EVERILL     English
Derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
EWART (1)     English
From a Norman form of EDWARD.
EWART (2)     English
From the name of an English town, derived from Old English ea "river" and worþ "enclosure".
FABIAN     English, French, Polish
Derived from the given name FABIAN.
FAIRBAIRN     Scottish, English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English.
FAIRBURN     English
From a place name which meant "fern stream", from Old English fearn "fern" and burna "stream".
FAIRCHILD     English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English.
FAIRCLOUGH     English
From Old English, meaning "fair cliff".
FARMER     English
Occupational name for a tax collector, from Middle English farme "rent, revenue, produce, meal", which was derived via medieval Latin from Old English feorm. This word did not acquire its modern meaning until the 17th century.
FARNHAM     English
Indicated a person from any of the various towns named Farnham in England, notably in Surrey. Their names are from Old English fearn "fern" and ham "home, settlement" or ham "water meadow, enclosure".
FAULKNER     English, Scottish
Old English for "falconer".
FAY     French, English
Refers to one who came from Fay or Faye (meaning "beech tree") in France.
FEAR     English
From an Old English nickname feare meaning "friend".
FENN     English
From a name for someone who dwelt near a marsh, from Old English fenn meaning "fen, swamp, bog".
FIELDS     English
Name for a person who lived on or near a field or pasture, from Old English feld.
FIRMIN     English, French
From the given name FIRMIN.
FISHER     English, Jewish
Cognate of FISCHER.
FISHMAN     English
Occupational name for a fisherman.
FITZROY     English
Means "son of the king" in Anglo-Norman French, from French roi meaning "king".
FLEMING     English
Given to a person who was a Fleming, that is a person who was from Flanders in the Netherlands.
FLETCHER     English
Means "fletcher", someone who attaches feather flights to the shaft of an arrow. It also refers to a seller of arrows.
FORD     English
Name given to someone who lived by a ford, possibly the official who maintained it.
FOREST     English, French
Originally belonged to a person who lived near or in a forest. It was probably originally derived, via Old French forest, from Latin forestam (silva) meaning "outer (wood)".
FORESTER     English
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see FOREST).
FORNEY     English, Scottish
Name for someone who lived around ferns, from Middle English fern "fern" and heye "enclosure".
FORREST     English
Variant of FOREST.
FOSS     English, French
Derived from Old French fosse "ditch".
FOSTER (1)     English
Variant of FORESTER.
FOSTER (2)     English
Occupational name for a scissor maker, derived from Old French forcetier.
FOSTER (3)     English
Occupational name for a woodworker, derived from Old French fustrier.
FOSTER (4)     English
Nickname given to a person who was a foster-child or foster-parent.
FOWLER     English
Occupational name for a fowler or bird-catcher, ultimately derived from Old English fugol meaning "bird".
FOX     English
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
FRANCIS     English
Derived from the given name FRANCIS.
FRANK (1)     English
Derived from the given name FRANK (1).
FRANK (2)     English
From Old English franc meaning "free".
FRANKLIN     English
Derived from Middle English frankelin meaning "freeman". It denoted a landowner of free but not noble birth, from Old French franc meaning "free".
FRANKLYN     English
Variant of FRANKLIN.
FREEMAN     English
Referred to a person who was born free, or in other words was not a serf.
FROST     English, German
From Old English and Old High German, a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
FRY     English
Root is from the Old English word frig meaning "free".
FRYE     English
Variant of FRY.
FULLER     English
Occupational name for a fuller. In medieval times fullers would soften and clean coarse cloth by pounding it.
FULTON     English
From the name of the English town of Foulden, Norfolk, meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
GABRIELS     English
Derived from the given name GABRIEL.
GABRIELSON     English
Means "son of GABRIEL".
GAGE     French, English
Occupational surname deriving either from Old French gauge "measure" (a name for an assayer) or gage "pledge" (a name for a moneylender).
GARDENER     English
Occupational surname for one who was a gardener, from Old French jardin meaning "garden" (of Frankish origin).
GARDINER     English
Variant of GARDENER.
GARDNER     English
Variant of GARDENER.
GAREY     English
Variant of GEARY.
GARFIELD     English
Means "triangle field" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president James A. Garfield (1831-1881).
GARLAND     English
Means "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. It originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
GARNER     English
Shortened form of GARDNER. It can also be a Middle English surname meaning "to gather grain" or "granary keeper".
GARNETT (1)     English
Occupational name referring to a person who made hinges, from Old French carne "hinge".
GARNETT (2)     English
From a diminutive of the given name GUARIN.
GARRARD     English
From the given name GERARD.
GARRET     English
Variant of GARRETT.
GARRETT     English
Derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD.
GARROD     English
Derived from the given name GERALD.
GARRY     English
Variant of GEARY.
GARY     English
Variant of GEARY.
GEARY     English
Derived from a Norman given name which was a short form of Germanic names starting with the element ger "spear".
GEORGE     English
Derived from the given name GEORGE.
GEORGESON     English
Means "son of GEORGE".
GIBB     English
Derived from the given name GIB.
GIBBS     English, Scottish
Means "son of GIB".
GIBSON     English, Scottish
Means "son of GIB".
GIFFARD     English
Derived from the Germanic given name GEBHARD.
GILBERT     English
Derived from the given name GILBERT.
GILES     English, French
From the given name GILES.
GILLIAM     English
Variant of WILLIAM. A famous bearer of the name is cartoonist and filmmaker Terry Gilliam (1940-).
GLADWIN     English
Derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLADWYN     English
Variant of GLADWIN.
GLASS     English, German
From Old English glæs or Old High German glas meaning "glass". This was an occupational name for a glass blower or glazier.
GLAZIER     English
Means "glass worker, glazier", from Old English glæs meaning "glass".
GLOVER     English
Means "a person who made or sold gloves" from Middle English glovere.
GODDARD     English
Derived from the Germanic given name GODEHARD.
GODFREY     English
From the Norman given name Godefrei, Godefroi(s) (see GODFREY).
GOFFE     English
Derived from Breton goff "smith" and referred to a worker in metals.
GOODE     English
From a nickname meaning "good", referring to a kindly person.
GOODWIN     English
Derived from the given name GODWINE.
GORBOLD     English
Means "son of Gerbold", a given name of Saxon origin.
GORE     English
From the Old English word gara meaning "a triangular plot of land".
GRANGER     English, French
Means "farm bailiff" from Old French grangier, ultimately from Latin granum meaning "grain". It is borne in the Harry Potter novels by Harry's friend Hermione Granger.
GRANT     English, Scottish
Derived from Norman French meaning "grand, tall, large, great".
GRANVILLE     English
Derived from a Norman place name GRAINVILLE.
GRAVES     English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve.
GRAY     English
From a nickname for a person who had grey hair or grey clothes.
GREEN     English
Descriptive name for someone who often wore the colour green or someone who lived near the village green.
GREENE     English
Variant of GREEN.
GREGORY     English
From the given name GREGORY that was popular in the Christian world during the Middle Ages.
GRENVILLE     English
Variant of GRANVILLE.
GREY     English
Variant of GRAY.
GRIFFIN (2)     English
Nickname from the mythological beast with body of a lion with head and wings of an eagle. It is ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).
GROVES     English
From Old English graf "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
GULLY     English
Nickname for a big person, from Middle English golias meaning "giant" (ultimately from Goliath, the Philistine warrior who was slain by David in the Old Testament).
HACKETT     English
From a diminutive of the medieval given name Hake, which was of Old Norse origin and meant "hook".
HADAWAY     English
Variant of HATHAWAY.
HADEN     English, Irish
Variant of HAYDEN (1).
HAGGARD     English
From a descriptive nickname meaning "wild, untamed, worn".
HAIGHT     English
Given to someone who lived at the top of a hill.
HAILEY     English
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAINES     English
Variant of HAYNES.
HALE     English
Derived from Old English healh meaning "nook, hollow".
HALEY     English
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALL     English, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Means simply "hall", given to one who either lived in or worked in a hall (the house of a medieval noble).
HALLMAN     English, Swedish
Occupational variant of HALL.
HAMELDON     English, Scottish
Variant of HAMILTON.
HAMILTON     English, Scottish
From an English place name, derived from the elements hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". This was the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists).
HAMM     English
Means "river meadow" in Old English.
HAMPSON     English
Means "son of HAMO".
HAMPTON     English
From the name of a town in England, meaning "homestead farm".
HANCOCK     English
From a diminutive of the medieval name HANN. Early records reveal a Hanecock from the county of Yorkshire who appeared in the Hundred Rolls in the year 1273.
HANLEY     English
Means "high meadow" in Old English.
HANSON     English
Means "son of HANN".
HARDEN     English
From a place name meaning "hare valley" in Old English.
HARDING     English
Derived from the given name HEARD. A famous bearer was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
HARDWICK     English
From Old English heord "herd" and wíc "village, town".
HARDY     English, French
From Old French hardi meaning "bold, daring".
HARFORD     English
Habitational name from places called Harford, in Gloucestershire and Devon, meaning "hart ford".
HARGRAVE     English
Derived from the Old English elements har meaning "grey" and graefe "thicket".
HARLAN     English
Variant of HARLAND.
HARLAND     English
From a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English.
HARLEY     English
Derived from a place name meaning "hare clearing", from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARLOW     English
Habitational name derived from a number of locations named Harlow, from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARMAN     English, French, German
Variant of HERMANN.
HARMON     English
From the given name HERMAN.
HAROLDSON     English
Means "son of HAROLD".
HARPER     English
Originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps.
HARRELL     English
From the given name HAROLD.
HARRELSON     English
Variant of HAROLDSON. A famous bearer of this surname is the American actor Woody Harrelson.
HARRIS     English
Means "son of HARRY".
HARRISON     English
Means "son of HARRY".
HART     English
Means "male deer". It was originally acquired by a person who lived in a place frequented by harts, or bore some resemblance to a hart.
HARTELL     English
Diminutive of either hardt "hardy, tough" or hart "male deer".
HARVEY     English
From the Breton given name Haerviu (see HARVEY).
HATHAWAY     English
Habitational name for someone who lived by a path across a heath, from Middle English hathe "heath" and weye "way".
HATHEWAY     English
Variant of HATHAWAY.
HATHOWAY     English
Variant of HATHAWAY.
HAWARD     English
Variant of HOWARD (1) or HAYWARD.
HAWK     English
Originally a nickname for a person who had a hawk-like appearance or who acted in a fierce manner.
HAWKING     English
From a diminutive of HAWK.
HAWKINS     English
Patronymic surname derived from a diminutive of HAWK.
HAYDEN (1)     English
Derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYES (1)     English
Denoted a dweller at or near a hedge or hedged enclosure, or the keeper of hedges or fences. A famous bearer was American President Rutherford B. Hayes.
HAYLEY     English
From the name of an English town meaning "hay clearing", from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing".
HAYNES     English
Patronymic derived from the Norman name HAGANO.
HAYWARD     English
Occupational name for a person who protected an enclosed forest. It is from Middle English hay "enclosure" and ward "guard".
HAYWOOD     English
Derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HEAD (1)     English
From Middle English hed, from Old English heafod, akin to Old High German houbit and Latin caput (both meaning "head"). The surname is occupational and describes the one in charge of a division or department in an office or institution, that is a headmaster.
HEAD (2)     English
Referred originally to a person who lived at the head of a river or on a hilltop.
HEADLEY     English
From a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HEATH     English
Originally belonged to a person who was a dweller on the heath or open land.
HEDLEY     English
Variant of HEADLEY.
HENDERSON     Scottish, English
Means "son of HENDRY".
HENDRY     Scottish, English
Derived from the given name HENRY.
HENRY     English
Derived from the given name HENRY.
HENRYSON     English
Means "son of HENRY". A bearer of this surname was the poet Robert Henryson (1425-1500).
HENSON     English
Means "son of Henne", Henne being a diminutive of HENRY.
HEPBURN     Scottish, English
From a place name meaning "high burial mound" in Old English. Famous bearers of the name include Hollywood actresses Katherine Hepburn and Audrey Hepburn. Mary Queen of Scot's infamous third husband, James Hepburn, Earl of Bothwall, also bore the name.
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