English Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
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AARONJewish, English
From the given name AARON.
ABBEYEnglish
Indicated a person who lived near an abbey or worked in an abbey, from Middle English abbeye.
ABBOTTEnglish
English cognate of ABATE.
ABEL (1)English, French, Danish, Spanish
Derived from the given name ABEL.
ABNEYEnglish
From the name of a town in Derbyshire, derived from Old English meaning "Abba's island".
ABRAHAMJewish, English, German, French, Spanish, Dutch
Derived from the given name ABRAHAM.
ABRAMEnglish
Derived from the given name ABRAHAM.
ABRAMSJewish, English
Means "son of ABRAHAM".
ABRAMSONEnglish
Means "son of ABRAHAM".
ACKERGerman, English
Denoted a person who lived near a field, derived from Middle English aker or Middle High German acker meaning "field".
ACKERMANEnglish
Means "ploughman", derived from Middle English aker "field" and man.
ADAIREnglish
Derived from the given name EDGAR.
ADAMEnglish, French, German, Polish, Romanian, Jewish
Derived from the given name ADAM.
ADAMSEnglish, Jewish
Derived from the given name ADAM.
ADAMSONEnglish
Means "son of ADAM".
ADCOCKEnglish
Derived from a diminutive of the given name ADAM.
ADDISONEnglish
Means "son of ADDY (2)".
AIKENEnglish
From the medieval given name Atkin, a diminutive of ADAM.
AINSWORTHEnglish
Habitational name for a person from the village of Ainsworth near Manchester, itself from the Old English given name Ægen and worþ meaning "enclosure".
AITKENScots, English
Derived from the medieval given name Atkin, a diminutive of ADAM.
AKERSEnglish
Variant of ACKER.
ALANEnglish, Scottish
Derived from the given name ALAN.
ALBERTEnglish, French, Catalan, Hungarian, Romanian, German
Derived from the given name ALBERT.
ALBERTSEnglish, Dutch
Means "son of ALBERT".
ALBERTSONEnglish
Means "son of ALBERT".
ALBINSONEnglish, Swedish
Means "son of ALBIN".
ALDENEnglish
Derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.
ALEXANDEREnglish
Derived from the given name ALEXANDER.
ALFREDSONEnglish
Means "son of ALFRED".
ALGEREnglish
From the given name ALGAR.
ALLANEnglish, Scottish
Derived from the given name ALAN.
ALLARDFrench, English
Derived from the given name ADALHARD (or the Old English cognate ÆÐELRÆD).
ALLENEnglish, Scottish
Derived from the given name ALAN.
ALLSOPPEnglish
From the name of the village of Alsop en la Dale in Derbyshire, England. It means "Ælli's valley" in Old English.
ALVEYEnglish
Derived from the given name ÆLFWIG.
ALVINEnglish
Variant of ELWYN.
ANDERSONEnglish
Means "son of ANDREW".
ANDREWSEnglish
Means "son of ANDREW".
ANSELEnglish
Derived from the given name ANSELM.
ANSONEnglish
Means "son of AGNES".
APPLEBYEnglish
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English æppel "apple" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
APPLETONEnglish
From the name of several English towns, meaning "orchard" in Old English (a compound of æppel "apple" and tun "enclosure, yard").
APTEDEnglish
Probably from an unidentified place name meaning "up tower" in Old English.
ARCHEREnglish
Occupational name for one who practiced archery, from Latin arcus "bow" (via Old French).
ARKWRIGHTEnglish
Occupational name for a chest maker, from Middle English arc meaning "chest, coffer" and wyrhta meaning "maker, craftsman".
ARMISTEADEnglish
Means "hermitage", indicating a person who lived near one, from Middle English ermite "hermit" and stede "place".
ARMSTRONGEnglish
Means "strong arm" from Middle English. Tradition holds that the family is descended from Siward, an 11th-century Earl of Northumbria. Famous bearers of this name include the Americans Louis Armstrong (1901-1971), a jazz musician, and Neil Armstrong (1930-2012), an astronaut who was the first person to walk on the moon.
ARNOLDEnglish
Derived from the given name ARNOLD.
ARRINGTONEnglish
From the name of a town in Cambridgeshire, originally meaning "Earna's settlement" in Old English (Earna being a person's nickname meaning "eagle").
ARTHUREnglish, French
From the given name ARTHUR.
ARTHURSONEnglish
Means "son of ARTHUR".
ASHEnglish
From Old English æsc meaning "ash tree", indicating a person who lived near ash trees.
ASHLEYEnglish
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many places in England which bear this name. The place name itself is derived from Old English æsc "ash tree" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ASHWORTHEnglish
From an English place name meaning "ash enclosure" in Old English.
ASTON (1)English
From a place name meaning "east town" in Old English.
ASTON (2)English
From the Old English given name ÆÐELSTAN.
ATKINSEnglish
Means "son of Atkin", a medieval diminutive of ADAM.
ATKINSONEnglish
Means "son of Atkin", a medieval diminutive of ADAM.
ATTAWAYEnglish
Means "at the way", originally denoting someone who lived close to a road.
ATTEBERRYEnglish
Means "dweller at the fortified town" from Middle English at and burh "fortified place".
ATWATEREnglish
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the water".
ATWOODEnglish
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the wood".
AUDLEYEnglish
From a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AUGUSTINEEnglish
From the given name AUGUSTINE (1).
AUSTINEnglish
Derived from the given name AUSTIN.
AVERILLEnglish
Derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERYEnglish
Derived from a Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AYERS (1)English
From Middle English eir meaning "heir".
AYERS (2)English
Derived from the given name EALHHERE.
AYERS (3)English
Indicated a person from the town of Ayr in Scotland. The town was named for the river which flows through it, itself derived from an Indo-European root meaning "water".
AYLMEREnglish
Derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR.
AYTONEnglish
From the name of towns in Berwickshire and North Yorkshire. They are derived from Old English ea "river" or eg "island" combined with tun "enclosure, yard, town".
BABCOCKEnglish
Derived from the medieval name Bab, possibly a diminutive of BARTHOLOMEW or BARBARA.
BACKUSEnglish
Means "bakery", an occupational name for a baker, from Old English bæchus literally "bake house".
BADCOCKEnglish
From a diminutive of the medieval given name BADA.
BAGLEYEnglish
From various English place names, all derived from Old English bagga "bag, badger" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
BAILEYEnglish
From Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", which comes via Old French from Latin baiulus "porter".
BAINES (2)English
From a nickname derived from Old English ban "bones", probably for a thin person.
BAKEREnglish
Occupational name meaning "baker", derived from Middle English bakere.
BALDWINEnglish
Derived from the given name BALDWIN.
BALLEnglish
From Middle English bal, Old English beall meaning "ball". This was either a nickname for a rotund or bald person, or a topographic name for someone who lived near a ball-shaped feature.
BANCROFTEnglish
From any of the various places of this name, derived from Old English bean meaning "bean" and croft meaning "small enclosed field".
BANKSEnglish
Originally indicated someone who lived near a hillside or a bank of land.
BANNEREnglish
Occupational name for a flag carrier, derived from Old French baniere meaning "banner", ultimately of Germanic origin.
BANNISTEREnglish
From Norman French banastre meaning "basket". This was originally a name for a maker of baskets.
BARBEREnglish, Scottish
Indicated a barber, one who cut hair for a living.
BARDSLEYEnglish
From the name a village near Manchester, from the Old English given name BEORNRÆD and leah "woodland, clearing".
BARKEREnglish
From Middle English bark meaning "to tan". This was an occupational name for a leather tanner.
BARLOWEnglish
Derived from a number of English place names which variously mean "barley hill", "barn hill", "boar clearing" or "barley clearing".
BARNESEnglish
Denoted a person who worked or lived in a barn. The word barn is derived from Old English bere "barley" and ærn "dwelling".
BARNETTEnglish
Derived from Old English bærnet meaning "a place cleared by burning".
BARREnglish
Indicated a person who lived near a barrier, from Old French barre.
BARRETTEnglish
Probably derived from a Middle English word meaning "strife", originally given to a quarrelsome person.
BARTONEnglish
From a place name meaning "barley town" in Old English.
BARTRAMEnglish
From the given name BERTRAM.
BASSEnglish
English cognate of BASSO.
BATESEnglish
Means "son of BATE".
BATESONEnglish
Means "son of BATE".
BATTLEEnglish
From a nickname for a combative person. In some cases it may come from the name of English places called Battle, so named because they were sites of battles.
BATTSEnglish
Means "son of BATE".
BAXTEREnglish
Variant (in origin a feminine form) of BAKER.
BEANEnglish
English cognate of BOHN.
BEASLEYEnglish
From the name of a place in Lancashire, from Old English beos "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BEAUMONTFrench, English
From French place names derived from beau "beautiful" and mont "mountain".
BECK (1)English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Cognate of BACH, from Middle English bekke (from Old Norse), Low German beke or Old Norse bekkr all meaning "stream".
BECK (3)English
From a nickname for a person with a big nose, from Middle English beke meaning "beak".
BECK (4)English
From Old English becca meaning "pickaxe", an occupational surname.
BECKETTEnglish
Originally a diminutive of BECK (1) or BECK (3).
BECKHAMEnglish
From a place name meaning "Becca's homestead". The byname Becca means "pickaxe" in Old English.
BELANGEREnglish
From the given name BERENGAR.
BELCHEREnglish
From a Middle English version of Old French bel chiere meaning "beautiful face". It later came to refer to a person who had a cheerful and pleasant temperament.
BELL (1)English
From Middle English belle meaning "bell". It originated as a nickname for a person who lived near the town bell, or who had a job as a bell-ringer.
BELL (2)English
Derived from the given name Bel, a medieval short form of ISABEL.
BELLAMYFrench, English
From Old French bel ami meaning "beautiful friend".
BELMONTFrench, English
French and English form of BELMONTE.
BENBOWEnglish
From a nickname "bend the bow" given to an archer.
BENNEnglish
From a short form of BENEDICT.
BENNETEnglish
Derived from the medieval English given name BENNETT.
BENNETTEnglish
Derived from the medieval English given name BENNETT.
BENSONEnglish
Means "son of BENEDICT".
BENTLEYEnglish
From a place name derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BENTONEnglish
Denoted someone who came from Benton, England, which is derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BERINGERGerman, English
From the given name BERENGAR.
BERNARDFrench, English, Dutch, Czech
From the given name BERNARD.
BERRYEnglish
Derived from a place name which was derived from Old English burh "fortification".
BEST (1)English
Derived from Middle English beste meaning "beast", an occupational name for a keeper of animals or a nickname for someone who acted like a beast. A famous bearer of this surname was soccer legend George Best (1946-2005).
BEVERLYEnglish
Derived from the name of an English city, meaning "beaver stream" in Old English.
BIRDEnglish
Occupational name for a person who raised or hunted birds.
BISHOPEnglish
Means simply "bishop", ultimately from Greek επισκοπος (episkopos) meaning "overseer". It probably originally referred to a person who served a bishop.
BISSETEnglish
From Old French bis meaning "drab, dingy", a nickname for someone who looked drab.
BLACKEnglish
Means either "black" (from Old English blæc) or "pale" (from Old English blac). It could refer to a person with a pale or a dark complexion, or a person who worked with black dye.
BLACKBURNEnglish
From the name of a city in Lancashire, meaning "black stream" in Old English.
BLACKMANEnglish
From a nickname, a variant of BLACK.
BLACKWOODEnglish, Scottish
From an English place name meaning "black wood".
BLAKEEnglish
Variant of BLACK. A famous bearer was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BLAKESLEYEnglish
From the name of a town in Northamptonshire, itself meaning "Blæcwulf's meadow" in Old English. Blæcwulf is a byname meaning "black wolf".
BLANCHARDFrench, English
Derived from the given name BLANCHARD.
BLOODWORTHEnglish
Originally indicated someone from the town of Blidworth in Nottinghamshire, which was derived from the Old English byname Blīþa (meaning "happy, blithe") combined with worð "enclosure".
BLOXHAMEnglish
From a place name meaning "Blocca's homestead". The Old English byname Blocca is of uncertain origin.
BLUEEnglish
From a nickname for a person with blue eyes or blue clothing.
BLYTHEEnglish
From Old English meaning "happy, joyous, blithe".
BOATWRIGHTEnglish
Occupational name meaning "maker of boats".
BOLTONEnglish
From any of the many places in England called Bolton, derived from Old English bold "house" and tun "enclosure".
BONDEnglish
Occupational name for a peasant farmer, from Middle English bonde.
BONE (1)English
Derived from Old French bon meaning "good".
BONHAMEnglish
English form of BONHOMME.
BONNEREnglish
From Middle English boneire "kind, courteous", derived from Norman French bon aire "good bloodline".
BONNEYEnglish
From northern Middle English boni meaning "pretty, attractive".
BOON (2)English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Bohon, in Manche in France. The town's name is of unknown origin.
BOOTHEnglish
Topographic name derived from Middle English both meaning "hut, stall".
BOTTERILLEnglish
Probably indicated someone from the town of Les Bottereaux in Normandy, itself derived from Old French bot "toad".
BOURKEEnglish
Variant of BURKE.
BOURNEEnglish
Derived from Old English burna "stream, spring".
BOWMANEnglish
Occupational name for an archer, derived from Middle English bowe, Old English boga meaning "bow".
BOYCEEnglish
From Old French bois meaning "wood", originally given to someone who lived by or in a wood.
BRADDOCKEnglish
From various locations derived from Old English meaning "broad oak".
BRADFORDEnglish
Derived from the name of the city of Bradford in West Yorkshire which meant "broad ford" in Old English. This is also the name of other smaller towns in England.
BRADLEYEnglish
From a common English place name, derived from brad "broad" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BRANDGerman, English
Derived from the Germanic given name BRANDO or its Old Norse cognate BRANDR.
BRANDONEnglish
From the name of various places in England meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English.
BRANSONEnglish
Means "son of BRANDR".
BRASHEREnglish
Means "brass worker", derived from Old English bræs "brass".
BRASSINGTONEnglish
From a place name, which derived from Old English meaning "enclosure by a steep path".
BRAYEnglish
From a place name derived from Cornish bre "hill".
BRECKENRIDGEScottish, English
Originally indicated someone from Brackenrig in Lanarkshire, derived from northern Middle English braken meaning "bracken" (via Old Norse brækni) and rigg meaning "ridge" (via Old Norse hryggr).
BRENTEnglish
Originally derived from the name of a hill (or the village nearby) in Somerset, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
BRETTEnglish
Originally a name given to someone who was a Breton, a person from Brittany.
BREWEREnglish
Occupational name for a maker of ale or beer.
BREWSTEREnglish
Variant of BREWER, originally a feminine form of the occupational term.
BRICEEnglish
From the given name BRICE.
BRIGHAMEnglish
Originally referred to one who came from a town called Brigham, meaning "homestead by the bridge" in Old English. This is the name of towns in Cumberland and Yorkshire.
BRISTOLEnglish
From the name of a city in England meaning "the site of the bridge".
BRISTOWEnglish
From the name of the city of Bristol, originally Brycgstow in Old English, meaning "the site of the bridge".
BRITTONEnglish
Originally given to a person who was a Briton (a Celt of England) or a Breton (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BROADBENTEnglish
From a place name derived from Old English brad "broad" and beonet "bent grass".
BROCKEnglish
Derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger", ultimately of Celtic origin.
BRONSONEnglish
Patronymic form of BROWN.
BROOKEnglish
Denoted a person who lived near a brook, a word derived from Old English broc.
BROOKEEnglish
Variant of BROOK.
BROOKSEnglish
Variant of BROOK.
BROWNEnglish
Originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin. A notable bearer is Charlie Brown from the 'Peanuts' comic strip by Charles Schulz.
BROWNEEnglish
Variant of BROWN.
BROWNLOWEnglish
From Old English brun meaning "brown" and hlaw meaning "mound, small hill". The name was probably given to a family living on a small hill covered with bracken.
BRYANEnglish
From the given name BRIAN.
BRYANTEnglish
From the given name BRIAN.
BRYCEEnglish
From the given name BRICE.
BRYSONEnglish
Means "son of BRICE".
BUCKLEY (1)English
From an English place name derived from bucc "buck, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BULLEnglish
From a nickname for a person who acted like a bull.
BULLARDEnglish
Possibly a nickname derived from Middle English bole "fraud, deceit".
BULLOCKEnglish
From a nickname meaning "young bull".
BUNKEREnglish
Derived from Old French bon cuer meaning "good heart".
BURKEEnglish, Irish
Derived from Middle English burgh meaning "fortress, fortification, castle". It was brought to Ireland in the 12th century by the Norman invader William FitzAdelm de Burgo.
BURNHAMEnglish
From the name of various towns in England, typically derived from Old English burna "stream, spring" and ham "home".
BURNS (1)English, Scottish
Derived from Old English burna "stream, spring". A famous bearer was the Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796).
BURRELLEnglish
English form of BUREAU.
BURTONEnglish
From a common English place name, derived from Old English meaning "fortified town".
BUSHEnglish
Originally a name for a person who lived near a prominent bush or thicket.
BUTCHEREnglish
Occupational name for a butcher, derived from Old French bouchier.
BUTLEREnglish, Irish
Occupational name derived from Norman French butiller "wine steward", ultimately from Late Latin butticula "bottle". A famous bearer of this surname is the fictional character Rhett Butler, created by Margaret Mitchell for her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936).
BUTTSEnglish
From a nickname meaning "thick, stumpy", from Middle English butt.
BYRDEnglish
Variant of BIRD.
CALDWELLEnglish
From various English place names derived from Old English ceald "cold" and well "spring, stream, well".
CANNONEnglish
From the ecclesiastical usage of canon, referring to a church official or servant who worked in a clergy house.
CANTRELLEnglish
Originally a name for someone from Cantrell in Devon, from an unknown first element and Old English hyll meaning "hill".
CARLEnglish, German
From the given name CARL.
CARLISLEEnglish
From the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of LUGUS". Later the Brythonic element ker "fort" was appended to the name of the city.
CARMAN (1)English
Occupational name for a carter, from Middle English carre "cart" (of Latin origin) and man "man".
CARMAN (2)English
From an Old Norse byname derived from karlmann meaning "male, man".
CARPENTEREnglish
From the occupation, derived from Middle English carpentier (ultimately from Latin carpentarius meaning "carriage maker").
CARTEREnglish
Occupational name for a person who operated a cart to transport goods, from Norman French caretier.
CARTWRIGHTEnglish
Occupational name indicating one who made carts.
CARVEREnglish
Occupational surname for a carver, from Middle English kerve "cut".
CASTLEEnglish
From Middle English castel meaning "castle", from Late Latin castellum, originally indicating a person who lived near a castle.
CAULFIELDEnglish
From a place name meaning "cold field", from Old English ceald "cold" and feld "pasture, field".
CAUSEREnglish
Occupational name for one who made leggings, derived from Old French chausse "leggings".
CAUSEYEnglish
Indicated a person who lived near a causeway, from Old French caucie.
CHADWICKEnglish
From the name of English towns meaning "settlement belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHAMBERLAINEnglish
Occupational name for one who looked after the inner rooms of a mansion, from Norman French chambrelain.
CHAMBERSEnglish
From Old French chambre "chamber, room", an occupational name for a person who worked in the inner rooms of a mansion.
CHANCEEnglish
From a nickname for a lucky person or a gambler.
CHANCELLOREnglish
Occupational name for an administrator, a chancellor, from Norman French chancelier.
CHANDLEREnglish
Occupational surname meaning "candle seller" or "candle maker" in Middle English, ultimately derived from Old French.
CHAPMANEnglish
Occupational name derived from Old English ceapmann meaning "merchant, trader".
CHASEEnglish
Occupational name for a hunter, from Middle English chase "hunt".
CHESHIREEnglish
Originally indicated a person from the county of Cheshire in England. Cheshire is named for its city CHESTER.
CHESTEREnglish
From the name of a city in England, derived from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
CHRISTIANFrench, German, English
Derived from the given name CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIANSEnglish
Derived from the given name CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTOPHEREnglish
Derived from the given name CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISTOPHERSEnglish
Derived from the given name CHRISTOPHER.
CHURCHEnglish
From the English word, probably referring to a person who lived close to a church.
CLARKEnglish
Means "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec meaning "priest", ultimately from Latin clericus. A famous bearer was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America.
CLARKEEnglish
Variant of CLARK.
CLARKSONEnglish
Patronymic form of CLARK.
CLAYEnglish
Means simply "clay", originally referring to a person who lived near or worked with of clay.
CLAYTONEnglish
From the name of various places meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
CLEMENSEnglish
Derived from the given name CLEMENT. This was the surname of the author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), also known as Mark Twain.
CLEMENTEnglish
Derived from the given name CLEMENT.
CLIFFORDEnglish
Derived from various place names which meant "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLIFTONEnglish
Derived from various place names meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
CLINTONEnglish
Derived from the place name Glympton meaning "settlement on the River Glyme" in Old English.
CLOSEEnglish
From Middle English clos meaning "enclosure", a topographic name for someone who lived near a courtyard or farmyard.
COBBEnglish
From a medieval English byname meaning "lump".
COCKEnglish
Derived from the medieval nickname cok which meant "rooster, cock". The nickname was commonly added to given names to create diminutives such as Hancock or Alcock.
COCKBURNScottish, English
Originally indicated someone who came from Cockburn, a place in Berwickshire. The place name is derived from Old English cocc "rooster" and burna "stream".
COCKSEnglish
Patronymic form of COCK.
COKEEnglish
Variant of COOK.
COKESEnglish
Variant of COOK.
COLBERTEnglish, French
Derived from the given name COLOBERT.
COLEEnglish
From the Old English byname COLA.
COLEMANIrish, English
From the given name COLMÁN.
COLLINGWOODEnglish
From a place name, itself derived from Old French chalenge meaning "disputed" and Middle English wode meaning "woods".
COLTONEnglish
From a place name meaning "COLA's town".
COMBSEnglish
Variant of COOMBS.
COMSTOCKEnglish
Possibly from the name of the River Culm in Devon, England. This name is seen in the Domesday book as Culmstoke or Colmstoke.
CONNEREnglish
From Middle English connere meaning "inspector", an occupational name for an inspector of weights and measures.
CONSTABLEEnglish
From Old French conestable, ultimately from Latin comes stabuli meaning "officer of the stable".
COOKEnglish
Derived from Old English coc meaning "cook", ultimately from Latin coquus. It was an occupational name for a cook, a man who sold cooked meats, or a keeper of an eating house.
COOKEEnglish
Variant of COOK.