English Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
There are 1,385 names matching your criteria. This is page 3.

HOLT     Dutch, Danish, English, Norwegian
Means "a wood" or "grove" in Old English or German.
HONEYCUTT     English
Derived from the name of the English town Hunnacott... [more]
HONEYSETT     English
English surname of Walloon origin, derived from a diminutive of the name JOHANNES (Hanosse).
HOOKER     English
Originally applied to one who lived near a spur, river bend, or corner of some natural feature.
HOOPER     English
Occupational name for someone who put the metal hoops around wooden barrels.
HOPE     English
Derived from Middle English hop "small valley".
HOPKINS     English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of HOB.
HOPPER     English
Referred to a person who hopped... [more]
HOPSON     English
Variant of HOBSON
HORN (1)     English, German, Norwegian, Danish
Occupational name for one who carved objects out of horn or who played a horn.
HORN (2)     English, German, Norwegian, Danish
Originally given to a person who lived near a horned-shaped geographical feature, such as a mountain or a bend in a river.
HORNE     English
Variant of HORN (1)
HORSFALL     English
Derived from a place in Yorkshire meaning "horse clearing".
HORTON     English
From the name of a town in Yorkshire meaning "mud town".
HOUSE     English
Referred to a person who lived in a house, as opposed to a smaller hut.
HOWARD (1)     English
Derived from the given name HUGHARD or HÁVARÐR.
HOWARD (2)     English
Derived from ewehirde meaning "ewe herder".
HOWE     English
Name for one who lived on a hill, from Middle English how "hill".
HOWLAND     English
Variant of HOLLANDS
HOWSE     English
Variant of HOWE
HUDDLESON     English
Means "son of Huddle" (see HUDSON).
HUDDLESTON     English
From the name of a town Huddleston in the Yorkshire region of England... [more]
HUDNALL     English
From the Old English place name Hudanheale meaning "Huda's heath" or "nook of land belonging to a man called Huda"... [more]
HUDSON     English
Means "son of HUDDE".
HUFF     English, German
Means "spur of a hill" in Old English.
HUGHES (1)     English
Patronymic of the given name HUGH.
HULL     English
Variant of HILL
HUME     Scottish, English
Variant of HOLME... [more]
HUNNISETT     English
Variant spelling of HONEYSETT.
HUNT     English
Variant of HUNTER
HUNTER     English, Scottish
Occupational name which referred to someone who hunted for a living, from Old English hunta.
HURST     English
From a Middle English place name meaning "thicket of trees"... [more]
HUTSON     English
Variant of HUDSON
HUXLEY     English
While the first element hux is obscure, the second element leah means "woodland, clearing".
HUXTABLE     English
Derived from the name of an English place meaning "hook post" (Old English hoc "hook" and stapol "post").
HYLAND (1)     English
Topographic surname meaning "high land".
IANSON     English
Variant of JANSON
IBBOT     English
Variant of IBBOTT
IBBOTT     English
Matronymic surname derived from the old feminine name Ibota, which in turn was derived from ISABEL, the oldest form of ELIZABETH to be introduced into England.
IKIN     English
Derived from a diminutive of the medieval given name IDA.
ILBERT     English
Derived from a Norman French form of the Germanic given name HILDIBERHT.
INGHAM     English
From an English place name meaning "INGA's homestead".
INGRAM     English
Derived from the Norman French given name ENGUERRAND.
IRVIN     English
Variant of IRVING or IRWIN
IRVINE     Scottish, English
Variant of IRVING
IRVING     Scottish, English
Originally derived from a Scottish place name (in North Ayrshire) meaning "green water".
IRWIN     English
Derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
ISAACSON     English
Means "son of ISAAC".
IVERS     English, Irish
Patronymic derived from the given name IVOR.
JACK     English, Scottish
From the given name JACK.
JACKSON     English
Means "son of JACK"... [more]
JACOBS     Dutch, English
Derived from the given name JACOB.
JACOBSON     Dutch, English, Norwegian
Means "son of JACOB".
JAKEMAN (1)     English
English form of the French name Jacquème (see JAMES).
JAKEMAN (2)     English
Means "servant of JACK".
JAMES     English
Derived from the given name JAMES.
JAMESON     English
Means "son of JAMES".
JAMISON     English
Means "son of JAMES".
JANS     Dutch, German, English
Means "son of JAN (1)".
JANSON     English, German
Means "son of JAN (1)".
JARDINE     Scottish, English
Means "garden", denoting someone who worked as a gardener.
JARRETT     English
Variant of GARRETT
JARVIS     English
Derived from the given name GERVAIS.
JEANES (1)     English
The first record of this name comes from records of William the Conqueror's land grants to his supporters during the Conquest of England... [more]
JEANES (2)     English
Derived from the given name Jan, a medieval form of JOHN.
JEFFERS     English
Patronymic of the given name JEFFREY... [more]
JEFFERSON     English
Means "son of JEFFREY"... [more]
JEFFERY     English
Derived from the given name JEFFREY.
JEFFRIES     English
Derived from the given name JEFFREY.
JEKYLL     English
Derived from the Breton given name JUDICAËL... [more]
JENKINS     English
From the given name Jenkin, a medieval diminutive of Jen, itself a Middle English form of JOHN.
JENNINGS     English
From the given name Jenyn, a medieval diminutive of Jen, itself a Middle English form of JOHN.
JEPHSON     English
Variant of JEPSON
JEPSON     English
Means "son of JEP".
JERNIGAN     Welsh, English
Derived from the Old Breton name Iarnuuocon meaning "iron famous".
JEROME     English
Derived from the given name JEROME... [more]
JERVIS     English
Variant of JARVIS
JEWEL     English
Variant of JEWELL
JEWELL     English
Derived from the Breton given name JUDICAËL.
JINKS     English
Means "son of Jenk", Jenk meaning "little JOHN".
JOHNS     English
Derived from the given name JOHN.
JOHNSON     English
Means "son of JOHN"... [more]
JOINER     English
Occupational surname for a carpenter (that is, a person who joined wood together to make furniture).
JONES     English, Welsh
Derived from the given name Jon, a medieval variant of JOHN.
JORDAN (1)     English, French, German, Polish
Derived from the given name JORDAN.
JOSEPHS     English
Derived from the given name JOSEPH.
JOSEPHSON     English
Means "son of JOSEPH".
JOYNER     English
Variant of JOINER
JUDD     English
Derived from the medieval name JUDD
KAY (1)     English
Derived from the given name KAY (2).
KAY (2)     English
Derived from Middle English kaye "wharf, quay"... [more]
KEEN     English
From Old English cene "bold, brave".
KEIGHLEY     English
Derived from an English place name meaning "clearing belonging to Cyhha"... [more]
KELLOGG     English
From the Middle Ages, a name for a butcher meaning "killer of hogs".
KELSEY     English
From an English place name meaning "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KEMP     English
Derived from the Middle English kempe meaning "champion, warrior".
KENDAL     English
Variant of KENDALL
KENDALL     English
Derived from the town of Kendale in England, and was so called from the river Kent, on which it is situated, and dael "valley, dale"... [more]
KENDRICK (1)     English
From the Old English given names CYNERIC or CENRIC.
KENNARD     English
Derived from the given names CYNEWEARD or CYNEHEARD.
KERRY     English
Variant of KENDRICK (1)
KERSEY     English
From an English place name meaning "watercress island".
KEVINS     English
Means "son of KEVIN".
KEVINSON     English
Means "son of KEVIN".
KEY     English
Variant of KAY (1) or KAY (2).
KEYS     English
Variant of KAY (1).
KIDD     English, Scottish
From a nickname meaning "young goat, kid" in Middle English.
KILLAM     English
Denoted one who hailed from the English town of Kilham, meaning "kiln hamlet".
KIMBALL     English
Derived from the Welsh given name CYNBEL or the Old English given name CYNEBALD.
KIMBERLEY     English
Variant of KIMBERLY
KIMBERLY     English
From various English places called Kimberley... [more]
KING     English
From Old English cyning, originally a nickname for someone who either acted in a kingly manner or who worked for or was otherwise associated with a king.
KINGSLEY     English
From a place name meaning "king's clearing" in Old English.
KINGSTON     English
From a place name meaning "king's town" in Old English.
KINSLEY     English
Derived from the given name CYNESIGE
KIPLING     English
From the name of a town in Yorkshire... [more]
KIRBY     English
Derived from Kirkeby, a name for numerous locations in northern England... [more]
KITCHEN     English
Occupational name for a person who worked in a kitchen (of a monastery for example).
KITCHENS     English
Variant of KITCHEN
KNAGGS     English
Found most commonly in the north of England, in particular Yorkshire... [more]
KNIGHT     English
From the Old English cniht, meaning "knight" or "tenant serving as a mounted soldier"... [more]
KYNASTON     English
Originally derived from a place name meaning "CYNEFRITH's town" in Old English.
LACEY     English
Variant of LACY
LACY     English
Derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy... [more]
LAMAR     French, English
Originally from a place name in Normandy, which was derived from Old French la mare meaning "the pool".
LANDON     English
Variant of LANGDON
LANE (1)     English
Originally designated one who lived by a lane, a narrow way between fences or hedges, later used of any narrow pathway, including one between houses in a town.
LANGDON     English
Derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge").
LANGLEY (1)     English
Habitational surname derived from old English lang "long" and leah "woodland, clearing".
LARSON     English
Means "son of Lar", where Lar is a medieval diminutive of LAURENCE (1).
LAW     English
Derived from old English hlaw "hill".
LAWRENCE     English
Derived from the given name LAURENCE (1)... [more]
LAWSON     English
Means "son of LAURENCE (1)".
LAYTON     English
Derived from a place name meaning "settlement with a leek garden" in Old English.
LEACH     English
Originally indicated a person who was a physician... [more]
LEAVITT     English
From Livet, a region in Normandy, France... [more]
LEDFORD     English
Means "path leading across a ford" from the Old English lædan, Middle English leden "to lead" and ford, a shallow area in a stream that may be crossed by wading.
LEE (1)     English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a leah, Old English meaning "woodland, clearing".
LEIGH     English
Variant of LEE (1)
LEIGHTON     English
Variant of LAYTON
LEON     French, English
Variant of LYON
LEONARDSON     English
Means "son of LEONARD".
LEVITT     English
Variant of LEAVITT
LEWIN     English
Derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
LEWIS (1)     English
Derived from the given name LEWIS... [more]
LEYTON     English
Variant of LAYTON
LINCOLN     English
Originally indicated that the bearer was from the English city of Lincoln, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony"... [more]
LINDON     English
Variant of LYNDON
LINDSAY     English, Scottish
From the region of Lindsey in Lincolnshire, which means "LINCOLN island" in Old English.
LINDSEY     English, Scottish
Variant of LINDSAY
LINTON     English
Originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "lime tree town" in Old English.
LINWOOD     English
Originally derived from a place name meaning "stream forest" in Old English.
LITTLE     English
Derived from a nickname given to a short person.
LOCKWOOD     English
From an English place name meaning "enclosure forest".
LOMAN     English
From the name of the River Loman in Devon.
LONDON     English
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain.
LONG     English
Originally a nickname for a person who had long legs or arms, or that was tall.
LONGSTAFF     English
Name for a tipstaff or beadle who carried a long staff as a badge of office, or else referred to someone who was very tall.
LOVEL     English
Variant of LOWELL
LOVELL     English
Variant of LOWELL
LOW     English, Scottish
Variant of LAW
LOWE (2)     English, Scottish
Variant of LOW
LOWELL     English
Derived from a Norman French nickname, from lou "wolf" and a diminutive suffix.
LOWRY     Scottish, English
From a diminutive of LAURENCE (1).
LUCAS     Dutch, English
Derived from the given name LUCAS... [more]
LUKESON     English
Means "son of LUKE".
LUM     English
From places in Lancashire and West Yorkshire called Lumb, both apparently originally named for Old English lum(m) "pool"... [more]
LUND     Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English
Means "grove of trees", from Old Norse lundr... [more]
LYNDON     English
Originally from a place name meaning "lime tree hill" in Old English.
LYNN     English
From the Welsh word llyn meaning "lake".
LYNTON     English
Variant of LINTON
LYNWOOD     English
Variant of LINWOOD
LYON     Scottish, English, French, Dutch
Habitational name from either the Lyon in southern central France, or Lyons-la-Forêt in Eure, Normandy.
MACEY     English
Variant of MASSEY
MACY     English
Variant of MASSEY
MADDISON     English
Variant of MADISON
MADISON     English
Means "son of MAUD"... [more]
MALLORY     English
From Old French maloret meaning "unfortunate, unlucky", a term introduced to England by the Normans.
MANN     German, English
From a nickname meaning "man"... [more]
MARCHAND     English, French
Occupational surname meaning "merchant", ultimately from Latin mercari "to trade".
MARK     English
Derived from the given name MARK.
MARLEY     English
Originally denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in Britain called Marley, ultimately meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English... [more]
MARLOW     English
Originally a name for a person from Marlow (Buckinghamshire), England... [more]
MARLOWE     English
Variant of MARLOW
MARSDEN     English
From a place name derived from Old English mearc "boundary" and denu "valley".
MARSHALL     English
Derived from Middle English mareschal "a marshal", ultimately derived from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant"... [more]
MARSTON     English
From a place name derived from Old English mersc "marsh" and tun "enclosure".
MARTEL (1)     English, French
Derived from the given name Martel, a medieval diminutive of MARTIN.
MARTEL (2)     French, English
Nickname for a smith, derived from old French martel "hammer", ultimately from Latin martellus.
MARTIN     English, French, German, Czech
Derived from the given name MARTIN.
MARTINS     English
Derived from the given name MARTIN.
MARTINSON     English
Means "son of MARTIN".
MASON     English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, ultimately of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
MASSEY     English
Derived from Massy, the name of several towns in France... [more]
MASTERS     English, Scottish
Means "son of the master" from Middle English maister.
MASTERSON     English
Means "son of the master" from Middle English maister.
MATHERS     English
Occupational surname meaning "mower" in Old English.
MATHEWS     English
Derived from the given name MATTHEW.
MATHEWSON     English
Means "son of MATTHEW".
MATTHEWS     English
Derived from the given name MATTHEW.
MATTHEWSON     English
Means "son of MATTHEW".
MAY     English
Derived from the given name MATTHEW.
MAYER (3)     English
Occupational name for a mayor, from Middle English mair.
MAYES     English
Patronymic form of MAY.
MAYNARD     English
Derived from the Germanic given name MEGINHARD.
MEADOWS     English
Referred to one who lived in a meadow.
MERCER     English
Occupational name for a trader, from Old French mercier.
MERCHANT     English
Variant of MARCHAND
MERRILL     English
Derived from the given name MURIEL.
MERRITT     English
From an English place name meaning "boundary gate".
MICHAEL     English
From the given name MICHAEL.
MICHAELS     English
Derived from the given name MICHAEL.
MICHAELSON     English
Means "son of MICHAEL".
MIDGLEY     English
From a village in England called Midgley which meant "midge (insect) wood" in Old English.
MILBURN     English
Derived from a place name meaning "mill stream" in Old English.
MILES     English
From the given name MILES.
MILFORD     English
Originally derived from various place names all meaning "ford by a mill" in Old English.
MILLARD     English
Variant of MILLWARD
MILLER     English
Occupational surname referring to a person who owned or worked in a grain mill, from Middle English mille "mill".
MILLHOUSE     English
Name for someone whose house was in a mill or who worked in a mill.
MILLS     English
Originally given to one who lived near a mill or who worked in a mill.
MILLWARD     English
Means "guardian of the mill" in Old English.
MILTON     English
Derived from an English place name meaning "mill town" in Old English... [more]
MINETT     English
From the medieval given name Minne, derived from the Germanic element minna "love".
MITCHELL     English, Irish, Scottish
Derived from the given name MICHAEL.
MONDAY (1)     English
Derived from the Old Norse given name Mundi which was a diminutive of names beginning with the element mundr meaning "protection".
MONDAY (2)     English
Denoted a person for whom this was a significant day, often the day they would pay their feudal service.
MONDY     English
Variant of MONDAY (1) or MONDAY (2)
MONTGOMERY     English, Scottish
From a place name in Calvados, France meaning "GUMARICH's mountain"... [more]
MOORE (1)     English
From Middle English mor meaning "open land" or "bog".
MOORE (2)     English
Derived from the given name MAURUS.
MOORE (3)     English
Nickname for a person of dark complexion, from Old French more meaning "Moor".
MOORES     English
Variant of MOORE (1)
MOORS     English
Variant of MOORE (1)
MORCE     English
Variant of MORRISS
MORIN     English
Variant of MOORE (2) and MOORE (3).
MORISON     English
Variant of MORRISON
MORRIS     English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Derived from the given name MAURICE.
MORRISH     English
Variant of MORRISS
MORRISON     English
Means "son of MORRIS".
MORRISS     English
Derived from the given name MORRIS.
MORSE     English
Variant of MORRISS
MOSES     Jewish, English
Derived from the given name MOSES.
MOTTERSHEAD     English
Derived from the name of a lost place in Cheshire, from the Old English byname Motere which meant "speaker" and Middle English heved meaning "headland".
MOULD     English
From the given name Mauld, a medieval form of MATILDA.
MOUNCE     English
Possibly an Americanized form of the German given name Manz.
MUNSON     English
Patronymic formed from the Norman French nickname moun meaning "monk".
MURGATROYD     English
From a place name meaning "MARGARET's road".
MUTTON     English
Referred to someone who took care of sheep (a shepherd), or else someone who in some way resembled a sheep.
MYERS     English
Patronymic form of MAYER (3).
MYLES     English
Variant of MILES
MYNATT     English
Variant of MINETT
NASH     English
Derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree"... [more]
NATHANS     English
Derived from the given name NATHAN.
NATHANSON     English
Means "son of NATHAN".
NEAL     English
Derived from the given name NEIL
NEIL     Irish, Scottish, English
Derived from the given name NEIL
NELSON     English
Means "son of NEIL".
NESS     Scottish, English, Norwegian
Means "headland" in Middle English, originally referring to a person who lived there.
NEVILLE     English, Irish
From a Norman French place name meaning "new town".
NEWELL     English, Irish
Variant of NEVILLE
NEWMAN     English
Means "new man, newcomer" from the Old English neowe, niwe, nige and mann.
NEWPORT     English
Given to one who came from the town of Newport (which means simply "new port"), which was the name of several English towns.
NEWTON     English
From the name of one of many English towns meaning "new town"... [more]
NICHOLS     English
Derived from the given name NICHOLAS.
NICHOLSON     English
Means "son of NICHOLAS"... [more]
NICOLSON     English
Variant of NICHOLSON
NIELSON     English
Variant of NELSON
NIGEL     English
From the given name NIGEL.
NILES     English
Means "son of NEIL".
NIXON     English
Means "son of NICHOLAS"... [more]
NOEL     French, English
Either from the given name NOËL, or else derived directly from Old French noel "Christmas" and given to a person who had a particular connection with the holiday.
NORMAN     English
Referred to a person who was originally from Scandinavia or Normandy... [more]
NORMANSON     English
Means "son of NORMAN".
NORRIS (1)     English, Scottish
Means "from the north" from Old French norreis... [more]
NORRIS (2)     English, Scottish
Means "wet nurse, foster mother" from Old French nurise, norrice.
NORTH     English
Name for a person who lived to the north... [more]
NORTHROP     English
Northrop is a name of a town in England. It means "north farm".
NORTON     English
Originally taken from a place name meaning "north town" in Old English.
NORWOOD     English
Originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
NOWELL     English
Variant of NOEL
NYE     English
Means "dweller at the river" from the Middle English atten eye, meaning "at the river".
OAKLEY     English
From a place name that had many oak trees... [more]
ODELL     English
Originally denoted a person who was from Odell (Bedfordshire), England.
OGDEN     English
Means "(dweller in the) oak valley" from Old English âc "oak" and denu "valley".
OLHOUSER     Norwegian, English
Means "(dweller by or near the) old house".
OLIVER     Catalan, English, French, German, Scottish
Derived from the given name OLIVER.
OLIVERSON     English
Means "son of OLIVER".
OSBORNE     English
Derived from the given name OSBORN.
OSBOURNE     English
Derived from the given name OSBORN.
OTIS     English
Means "son of ODE".
OTT     English, German
From the given name OTTO.
OUTLAW     English
Means simply "outlaw" from the Middle English outlawe.
OUTTERRIDGE     English
Derived from the Old English given name Uhtric which was composed of the elements uht "dawn" and ric "power".
OVERTON     English
Denotes a person who hailed from one of the various places in England called Overton or Orton.
OWSTON     English
Denotes a person who came from any one of the places in Britain called Ouston or Owston.
PADDON     English
Variant of PATTON
PADMORE     English
Originally indicated a person from Padmore, England.
PAGE     English, French
Occupational name meaning "servant, page"... [more]


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