Polish Surnames

Polish names are used in the country of Poland in central Europe. See also about Polish names.
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ADAMEnglish, French, German, Polish, Romanian, Jewish
Derived from the given name ADAM.
ADAMCZAKPolish
Derived from the given name ADAM.
ADAMCZYKPolish
Derived from the given name ADAM.
ANDRYSIAKPolish
Means "son of ANDRZEJ".
BARTOSZPolish
Derived from the given name BARTOSZ.
BOSKOPolish, Slovak
Derived from Slavic bosu meaning "barefoot".
BROŻPolish
Derived from Broż, a diminutive of AMBROŻY.
BRZEZICKIPolish
Derived from Polish brzezina meaning "birch grove".
BUDNYPolish
Possibly from Polish buda meaning "hut, cabin".
BUKOWSKIPolish
Originally denoted someone who came from a place called Bukowo or Bukowiec, which derive from Polish buk "beech".
CHLEBEKPolish
From Polish chleb "bread", used to denote a baker.
CHMIELPolish
Polish cognate of CHMELA, from Polish chmiel.
CZAJKAPolish
Means "lapwing (bird)" in Polish.
CZAJKOWSKIPolish
Originally indicated a person from any of the Polish towns named Czajków, all derived from Polish czajka meaning "lapwing (bird)".
DUBANOWSKIPolish
Originally indicated a person from the town of Dubinowo (now Dubino in Belarus).
DUBICKIPolish
Originally indicated a person from the town of Dubica in Poland.
DUNAJSKIPolish
Derived from Dunaj, the Polish name for the river Danube.
DZIEDZICPolish
Derived from Polish dziedzic "landowner".
FABIANGerman, English, Polish
Derived from the given name FABIAN.
FILIPEKPolish, Czech
Derived from a diminutive of the given name FILIP.
FILIPOWSKIPolish
Either a patronymic from the given name FILIP, or a habitational name denoting a person from the Polish town of Filipów (also derived from the given name).
GAJOSPolish
Derived from Polish gaj meaning "grove, thicket".
GNIEWEKPolish
Derived from Gniewek, a diminutive of ZBIGNIEW, JAROGNIEW, or other names containing gniew "anger".
GOMÓŁKAPolish
Derived from Polish gomółka, a type of round cheese, ultimately from an old Polish word meaning "round".
GORECKIPolish
Originally indicated a person from Górka, the name of various towns in Poland, ultimately from Polish góra "mountain".
GÓRSKIPolish
From the Polish word góra meaning "mountain".
GRZEŚKIEWICZPolish
Derived from the given name GRZEGORZ.
GWÓZDEKPolish
Derived from either archaic Polish gwozd meaning "forest" or gwóźdź meaning "nail".
JAGODAPolish
Means "berry" in Polish.
JANDAPolish, Czech
Derived from the given name JAN (1).
JANKOWSKIPolish
Habitational name for a person from a town named Jankowo or Janków, places derived from the given name JANEK.
JANOWSKIPolish
Habitational name for a person from a town named Janowo, Janow or Janowice, places derived from the given name JAN (1).
JASKOLSKIPolish
Originally indicated a person from Jaskolski in Poland. The name of the town itself is derived from Polish jaskolka "a swallow".
JEDYNAKPolish
Means "only child" from Polish jedynak.
JELENPolish, Czech, Slovak
Means "stag" in the Slavic languages.
JEZPolish
Means "hedgehog" in Polish. It may have originally referred to a person who lived near a sign bearing a hedgehog, or it may have been given to a person who resembled a hedgehog in some way.
KACZKAPolish
Means "duck" in Polish.
KALUZAPolish
Means "a puddle" in Polish.
KAMIŃSKIPolish
Originally denoted someone who came from a town called Kamien. Kamien comes from the Slavic word kamiñ meaning "stone".
KASPRZAKPolish
Means "son of KASPAR".
KAVAPolish
Derived from Polish kawa "coffee", perhaps originally denoting one who worked in the coffee trade.
KEDZIERSKIUkrainian, Polish
From a nickname meaning "curly", describing a person with curly hair.
KIJEKPolish
Means "a small stick" in Polish.
KLIMEKPolish
Derived from the name Klimek, a diminutive of KLEMENS.
KOSMATKAPolish
Derived from Polish kosmaty meaning "shaggy, hairy".
KOWALCZYKPolish
Patronymic derived from Polish kowal "blacksmith".
KOWALSKIPolish
From Polish kowal meaning "blacksmith".
KOZIOLPolish
Means "goat" in Polish, probably used to denote a goatherd.
KOZLOWPolish
From the Polish place name Kozlow, ultimately derived from koziol "goat".
KOZLOWSKIPolish
Originally a name for a person from Kozlow, Kozlowo, or any other place whose name was derived from Polish koziol "goat".
KRAKOWSKIPolish, Jewish
Habitational name for a person from the city of Kraków in southern Poland.
KRÓLPolish
Means "king" in Polish. The name referred to one connected in some way with a king's household.
KUMIEGAPolish
Derived from a Polish word meaning "friend".
LAWNICZAKPolish
Means "juror" from Polish lawnik.
LISPolish
Means "fox" in Polish. It is a nickname for a sly person.
MAJEWSKIPolish
Derived from Polish maj meaning "May". It may have been given in reference to the month the first bearer was baptized.
MALINOWSKIPolish
Means "dweller by raspberries" from Polish malina.
MALYPolish, Czech
Means "small" in the Slavic languages.
MAREKCzech, Polish, Hungarian
Derived from the given name MAREK.
MARSZAŁEKPolish
Polish cognate of MARSHALL.
MAŚLANKAPolish
Derived from Polish masło "butter". The name probably referred to a person who made or sold butter or buttermilk.
MENCHERPolish, Jewish
Occupational surname for a miller or flour dealer (derived from Polish maczarz).
MIAZGAPolish
Derived from Polish miazga "pulp".
MICHEL (1)French, German, Dutch, Basque, Polish
Derived from the given name MICHEL, MITXEL or MICHAŁ.
MIKOLAJCZAKPolish
From the Polish given name MIKOŁAJ.
MOZDZIERZPolish
Means "mortar" in Polish. It probably referred to someone who worked with or sold mortar.
NIEMCZYKPolish
Means "son of the German" from Polish niemec "German" and the patronymic part czyk.
NIEMECPolish
Means "German" in Polish.
NOSEKCzech, Polish
Means "small nose" in Czech and Polish.
NOWAKPolish
Polish form of NOVAK.
OSTROWSKIPolish
From Polish ostrów meaning "river island".
PAKULSKIPolish
Originally denoted a person from Pakuly, Poland.
PASTERNAKPolish, Ukrainian, Russian, Yiddish
Means "parsnip" in various Slavic languages, ultimately from Latin pastinaca. A famous bearer was Boris Pasternak (1890-1960), author of 'Doctor Zhivago'.
PASZEKPolish
Derived from a Polish diminutive of PAUL.
PIATEKPolish
Means "Friday" in Polish, ultimately derived from the Slavic word pjaty "fifth".
PIONTEKPolish
Variant spelling of PIATEK.
PIOTROWSKIPolish
Habitational name for a person from a town named Jankowo or Janków, places derived from the given name PIOTR.
POKORNYCzech, Slovak, Polish
Derived from the Slavic word pokorny "tame".
POPLAWSKIPolish
Means "from the water meadow" from Polish poplaw.
RÓGPolish
Means "animal horn" in Polish.
RUDAWSKIPolish
Indicated a person who lived near the Rudawa, a river in Poland.
RUSNAKPolish
Means "Russian" in Polish.
RUTKOWSKIPolish
Originally a name for a person from Rutki, Poland.
RYBACzech, Polish
Means "fish" in Czech and Slovak, an occupational name for a fisher.
SADOWSKIPolish
Denoted someone who lived in Sadowo, Sadowice or other places beginning with Polish sad "garden, orchard".
SERAFINPolish, Italian
Derived from the given name SERAFIN or SERAFINO.
SIENKIEWICZPolish
Patronymic from the given name Sienko, an old diminutive of SZYMON. This was the surname of the Polish writer Henryk Sienkiewicz (1846-1916).
SIKORAPolish
Means "tit (bird)" in Polish.
SITKOPolish
Means "a fine sieve" in Polish, a diminutive of the Polish word sito "sieve".
SKAŁAPolish
Polish cognate of SKÁLA.
ŚLĄSKIPolish
Polish cognate of SLEZÁK.
ŚLĄZAKPolish
Polish cognate of SLEZÁK.
ŚLUSARCZYKPolish
Diminutive form of ŚLUSARSKI.
ŚLUSARSKIPolish
Occupational name for a locksmith, from Polish ślusarz, of Germanic origin.
SMOLAKPolish, Czech
Occupational name for a distiller of pitch, derived from the Slavic word smola meaning "pitch, resin".
ŚNIEGOWSKIPolish
Habitational name for a person from Sniegow, Sniegowo or other places with a name derived from Polish śnieg "snow".
SOBÓLPolish
Polish cognate of SOBOL.
SOKALPolish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKÓŁPolish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKOŁOWSKIPolish
Usually refers to the city of Sokołów Podlaski in Poland. It may sometimes be derived from Polish sokół meaning "falcon".
SÓWKAPolish
From a diminutive of Polish sowa meaning "owl".
STANEK (1)Polish
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name STANISŁAW.
STAREKPolish
From a nickname derived from Polish stary "old".
STAROSTAPolish
Means "mayor, leader, elder" in Polish.
STASIUKUkrainian, Polish
From a diminutive of the given name STANISLAV.
STAWSKIPolish
Derived from Polish staw meaning "pond".
STOLARZPolish
Occupational name from Polish stolarz meaning "joiner, maker of furniture".
SZCZEPAŃSKIPolish
Derived from the given name SZCZEPAN.
SZEWCPolish
Means "shoemaker" in Polish.
SZWARCPolish
Polish phonetic spelling of German SCHWARZ.
SZWEDPolish
Variant of SZWEDA.
SZWEDAPolish
Derived from Polish Szwed meaning "Swede, person from Sweden".
SZWEDKOPolish
Variant of SZWEDA.
WALENTOWICZPolish
Means "son of WALENTY".
WARSZAWSKIPolish, Jewish
Place name for someone from the Polish city of Warsaw, itself derived from the given name Warsz, a short form of WARCISŁAW.
WIATERPolish
Derived from Polish wiatr "wind", a nickname for a quick person.
WINOGRODZKIPolish
Polish cognate of VINOGRADOV.
WOJEWODAPolish
From the Polish title wojewoda meaning "governor, voivode" (originally meaning "warlord").
WOLANSKIPolish
Denoted a person who came from one of the places in Poland called Wola or Wolany, derived from the given name Wolan meaning "to want".
WRONAPolish
Derived from Polish wrona meaning "crow".
WRONSKIPolish
Derived from Polish wrona meaning "crow".
WYRICKPolish
Americanized form of WYRZYK.
WYRZYKOWSKIPolish
Possibly from the Polish place name Wyrzyki, of uncertain meaning, maybe "away from the river".
ZĄBEKPolish
From Polish zab "tooth" and a diminutive suffix.
ZAWISZAPolish
Derived from the Old Polish given name ZAWISZA.
ZDUNOWSKIPolish
Denoted a person from one of the various towns named Zduny in Poland, which is derived from Polish zdun meaning "potter". It can also be an occupational surname derived directly from zdun.
ZIELIŃSKIPolish
From Polish zieleń meaning "green". It was possibly a nickname for a person who dressed in green clothing.
ZIEMNIAKPolish
Means "potato" in Polish.
ZIĘTEKPolish
Possibly from a diminutive of Polish zięć meaning "son-in-law".
ZIMACzech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian
From a Slavic word meaning "winter". This may have been a nickname for a person with a chilly personality.
ŻURAWPolish
Means "crane" in Polish, a nickname for a tall person.