English Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
There are 1,422 names matching your criteria. This is page 5.

STENET     English
Derived from Sten, a diminutive of STEPHEN, plus the diminutive suffix -et.
STEPHENS     English
Derived from the given name STEPHEN.
STEPHENSON     English
Means "son of STEPHEN".
STERN     English
From Old English styrne, Middle English sterne. This was used as a nickname for someone who was stern, harsh, or severe in manner or character.
STEVENS     English
Variant of STEPHENS.
STEVENSON     English
Variant of STEPHENSON.
STIDOLPH     English
From an Old English name meaning "strong wolf".
ST JOHN     English
From the place name St JOHN.
STODDARD     English
Occupational name for a horse keeper, from Old English stod "stud" and hierde "herder".
STONE     English
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone, or a person who worked with stone. It is derived from Old English stan.
STRANGE     English
Derived from Middle English strange "foreign" (ultimately derived from Latin extraneus).
STREET     English
Habitational name for anyone who lived in a place called Street, for example in Hertfordshire, Kent and Somerset. It is derived from Old English stræt "Roman road".
STRICKLAND     English
From a place called Strickland in Westmoreland, England. The place name is of Old English origin, from stirc "young bullock" and land "cultivated land".
STRINGER     English
Occupational name for a maker of string or bow strings, from Middle English streng "string".
STROUD     English, Scottish
Locational name meaning "thicket, marsh, marshy ground overgrown with brushwood".
STRUDWICK     Scottish, English
Originally a name for a person from Strudwick, England.
STYLES     English
Locational name for one who lived near a steep hill, from Old English stigol "climb".
SUDWORTH     English
From an English place name composed of sud "south" and worth "farm".
SUGGITT     English
Variant of SOUTHGATE.
SUMMERFIELD     English
Means literally "dwellers in the summer fields", and is derived from the city of Summerfield, located in the county of Norfolk in England.
SUMMERS (1)     English
Occupational surname meaning "summoner", which is the petty official who calls people to appear in court.
SUMMERS (2)     English
From Middle English sumer meaning "summer". This was a nickname given to someone associated with the summer season.
SUMNER     English
Occupational name for a summoner, an official who was responsible for ensuring the appearance of witnesses in court, Middle English sumner, sumnor.
SUTTON     English
Means "south town". Several towns in England bear this name.
SWEET     English
From a nickname meaning "sweet, pleasant".
SWINDLEHURST     English
From a place name in the Forest of Bowland in central Lancashire. In 1190 Sir Robert Fitzhenry, Lord of Lathom, gave the lease of part of his land in Aules-Large called Swynleyhurst (meaning "pig grazing wood") to a family who adopted the place as their family name.
SYDNEY     English
Variant of SIDNEY.
SYMONS     English
Derived from the given name SIMON.
TAILOR     English
Variant of TAYLOR.
TANNER     English
Originally derived from the occupation of the same name - a person who tanned animal hides.
TASH     English
From Middle English at asche "at the ash tree".
TASKER     English
Middle English taske meaning "task or assignment". A tasker was a person who had a fixed job to do, particularly a person who threshed corn with a flail.
TATE     English
Derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown meaning.
TATHAM     English
From the place name Tatham, which came from the 7th-century given name Tata and ham meaning "homestead".
TAYLOR     English
Derived from Old French tailleur meaning "tailor", ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut".
TEEL     English
Means "teal, duck" from Middle English tele.
TENNISON     English
Means "son of DENIS".
TENNYSON     English
Means "son of DENIS".
TERRELL     English
Probably derived from the Norman French nickname tirel "to pull", referring to a stubborn person.
TERRY     English
Derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of THEODORIC.
THACKER     English
Northern Middle English variant of THATCHER.
THATCHER     English
Referred to a person who thatched roofs by attaching straw to them.
THOMAS     English, French
Derived from the given name THOMAS.
THOMPSETT     English
From a diminutive form of THOMAS.
THOMPSON     English
Means "son of THOMAS".
THOMSON     English
Variant of THOMPSON.
THORBURN     English, Scottish
Derived from the Old Norse given name ÞÓRBJÖRN.
THORLEY     English
From a place name meaning "thorn clearing" in Old English.
THORN     English, Danish
Originally applied to a person who lived in or near a thorn bush.
THORNE     English
Variant of THORN.
THORNTON     English
From a place name meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
THORPE     English
From Old Norse þorp "village".
THRUSSELL     English
From Old English þrostle meaning "having the characteristics of a song thrush".
THURSTAN     English
Derived from the Old Norse name ÞÓRSTEINN.
THWAITE     English
Means "dweller in a forest clearing, fenced off enclosure or low meadows" from the Old Norse Þveit.
TIFFT     English, German
Variant of TOFT.
TIMBERLAKE     English
From an English place name meaning (obviously) "timber lake".
TINDALL     English
From Tindale, the name of a town in Cumbria, derived from the name of the river Tyne combined with Old English dæl "dale, valley".
TINKER     English
Occupational name meaning "mender of kettles, pots, pans". The name could derive from the tinking sound made by light hammering on metal. It is possible that the word comes from the word tin, the material with which the tinker worked.
TIPTON     English
Originally given to one who came from the town of Tipton (which means "town of Tibba").
TIRRELL     English
Variant of TERRELL.
TITTENSOR     English, Welsh
Indicated a person from Tittensor, England. Tittensor, as a place name, means "Titten's ridge".
TOBIAS     English, French, German, Jewish
From the given name TOBIAS.
TOBIN     English
From a diminutive of the given name TOBIAS.
TOD     English
Variant of TODD.
TODD     English
Means "fox", derived from Middle English todde.
TOFT     English
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many places in Britain of that name.
TOLBERT     English, French
Derived from a continental Germanic given name of unknown meaning, the second element of the name is derived from berht meaning "bright, famous".
TOLLEMACHE     English
Means "knapsack" in Old French.
TOLLER     English
Occupational name meaning "tax gatherer", derived from Middle English toll.
TOWNER     English
Variant of TOLLER.
TOWNSEND     English
Means "dweller at the town's end".
TRACEY (1)     English
From the village of Tracy-sur-mer on the Normandy coast in France. It was brought to England with William the Conqueror.
TRACY     English, Irish
Variant of TRACEY (1) or TRACEY (2).
TRASK     English, Scottish
Originally indicated a person from Thirsk, England.
TRAVERS     English, French
From an English and French place name that described a person who lived near a bridge or ford, or occasionally as an occupational name for the collector of tolls at such a location... [more]
TRAVES     English
English variant of TRAVERS.
TRAVIS     English
English variant of TRAVERS.
TRAVISS     English
English variant of TRAVERS.
TRAYLOR     English
Meaning unknown.
TRELOAR     English
Originally denoted a person from Treloar in Cornwall, England.
TRENGOVE     English
Originally indicated a person from Trengove farm in Cornwall.
TRENT     English
Denoted one who lived near the River Trent in England.
TREVIS     English
English variant of TRAVERS.
TRIGGS     English
From a nickname meaning "loyal" (Old Norse triggr).
TRUEMAN     English
Variant of TRUMAN.
TRUMAN     English
Means "trusty man" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972).
TUCKER     English
Derived from Old English tucian meaning "one who fulls cloth".
TUFF     English
Variant of TUFT.
TUFT     English
Means "(dweller by) a clump of trees or bushes" from Middle English tufte, tuffe.
TUPPER     English
Derived from Middle English toupe "ram". This was originally a name for a herdsman who tended rams.
TURNBULL     English, Scottish
Nickname for someone thought to be strong enough to turn around a bull.
TURNER     English
Occupational name meaning "one who works with a lathe".
TYLER     English
Occupational name meaning "tiler of roofs", from Old English tigele "tile". A famous bearer of this name was American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
TYRELL     English
Variant of TERRELL.
TYRRELL     English
Variant of TERRELL.
TYSON (1)     English
Derived from a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French tison meaning "firebrand".
TYSON (2)     English
Variant of DYSON.
UNDERHILL     English
Means "dweller at the foot of a hill". It can also be a locational name from Underhill in Devon, which was from Old English under "under" and hyll "hill", or from Underhill in Kent, from Old English under and helde "slope".
UNDERWOOD     English, Scottish
From a Scottish and English place name for a man who lived at the edge of the woods. It is formed from Middle English under and wood. Both terms have survived to modern day with the same meanings.
UPTON     English
Derived from a place name meaning "upper town" in Old English.
VANCE     English
Means "dweller by a fen, marsh" from Old English fenn.
VAN MIDDLESWORTH     English, Dutch
Americanized form of VAN MIDDELBURG.
VANN (1)     English
Means "dweller by a fen, marsh" from Old English fenn.
VARLEY     English
Originally denoted a person from Verly, France.
VARNHAM     English
Variant of FARNHAM.
VERITY     English
From a nickname meaning "truth", perhaps given originally to a truthful person.
VERNON     English
Locational name in the Eure region of Normandy, from the Gaulish element vern "alder (tree)" with the genitive case maker -onis making it "place of the alders".
VICTOR     French, English
Derived from the male given name VICTOR.
VICTORE     English (Rare)
Variant of VICTOR.
VICTORS     English, French
Derived from the given name VICTOR.
VINCENT (1)     English, French
From the given name VINCENT.
VIPOND     French, English
Anglicized form of French Vieuxpont "old bridge". It is a place in Calvados (Normandy).
VIRGO     English
Possibly from Latin virgo "virgin, maiden". It may have been a nickname for an actor who played the Virgin Mary in mystery plays. It may also have been used to describe a shy or girlish man or a lecher.
WADE (1)     English
Derived from the Old English place name wade meaning "a ford".
WADE (2)     English
From the Old English given name Wada, a derivative of the word wadan "to go".
WAKEFIELD     English
Originally indicated a person who came from the town of Wakefield, which means literally "field for the yearly wake or festival".
WALKER     English
Occupational surname for a person who walked on damp raw cloth in order to thicken it. It is derived from Middle English walkere, Old English wealcan.
WALLACE     Scottish, English, Irish
Means "foreigner, stranger" from the Norman French waleis. It was often used to denote native Welsh and Bretons. A famous bearer was the 13th-century Sir William Wallace of Scotland.
WALLER (1)     English
Derived from Old French gallier meaning "man with a pleasant temper".
WALLER (2)     English
Derived from Middle English walle denoting a builder of walls. Sometimes the name may be derived from Middle English welle meaning "(dweller by a) stream".
WALLIS     Scottish, English
Variant of WALLACE.
WALMSLEY     English
From an English place name meaning "a clearing in a wood, near a lake".
WALSH     English, Irish
Means "Celtic", from Middle English walsche "foreigner" (related to Welsh).
WALTER     English, German
Derived from the given name WALTER.
WALTERS     English
Derived from the given name WALTER.
WALTERSON     English
Means "son of WALTER".
WALTON     English
From any of several villages in England, from Old English wald "wood", wall "wall", or wælla "stream, spring" and ton "town".
WARD (1)     English
Derived from the Old English occupation weard meaning "guard, watchman".
WARD (4)     English
Americanized form of French GUÉRIN.
WARDROBE     English
Means "warder of the robes", from Old French warder, garder "to watch" and robe.
WARE     English
Most examples of this surname are probably derived from Old English wær meaning "(dweller by the) dam, weir". Some instances may stem from the Middle English nickname war(e) meaning "wary, astute, prudent".
WARNER     German, English
Variant of WERNER.
WARREN (1)     English
Denoted a person who lived near a warrene, Norman French meaning "animal enclosure" (of Germanic origin).
WARREN (2)     English
Originally denoted a person from the town of La Varenne in Normandy.
WARRICK     English
Variant of WARWICK.
WARWICK     English
From the name of a town, itself derived from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wic "dairy farm".
WASH     English
Derived from the Old French name Gace, Old German Wazzo and Frisian Watso which all are diminutives of Old German names beginning with Wad- or Warin-.
WASHINGTON     English
From a place name meaning "town belonging to Wassa's people", from Old English tun meaning "enclosure", and Wassa, a given name derived from Wāðsige, composed of the elements wāð "hunt" and sige "victory"... [more]
WATERMAN (1)     English
Means "servant of WALTER".
WATERMAN (2)     English, Dutch
Occupational surname for a boatman or a water carrier. It could also describe a person who lived by water.
WATERS (1)     English
Originally given to a person who lived near the water.
WATKINS     English
Derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, which was a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WATSON     English, Scottish
Patronymic form of the English and Scottish name Watt, which came from the popular Middle English given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WATT     English
Derived from the given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WATTS     English
Patronymic derived from the given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WAY     English
Originally given to a person who lived near a road (a way).
WAYNE     English
Occupational name meaning "wagon maker, cartwright", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". A famous bearer was actor John Wayne (1907-1979).
WEAVER     English
Occupational name meaning simply "weaver" from Old English wefan, Middle English weven. Some examples of the surname may derive from the River Weaver, from Old English wefer meaning "winding stream".
WEBB     English
Occupational name meaning "weaver", from Old English webba.
WEBSTER     English
Occupational name meaning "weaver", from Old English webba.
WEEKES     English
Means "dweller in an outlying settlement (dependent on a larger village)" from Old English wic.
WELCH     English
Variant of WALSH.
WELLS     English
Derived from Middle English welle meaning "well". This was a name for someone who lived near a spring or stream.
WEMBLEY     English
From the name of a town, now part of Greater London, meaning "WEMBA's clearing" in Old English.
WESCOTT     English
From a place name which meant "west cottages" in Old English.
WESLEY     English
Variant of WESTLEY.
WEST     English, German
Denoted a person who lived to the west of something, or who came from the west.
WESTBROOK     English
From a place in southern England (Hampshire, Devon) meaning "from west of the brook".
WESTLEY     English
From a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English.
WHEELER     English
Occupational name for a maker of wagon wheels.
WHEELOCK     English
Originally indicated a person from Wheelock (Cheshire), England. It is derived from the Welsh words chevel-og meaning "winding river".
WHINERY     English
Originally indicated a person from Whinneray (Cumbria), England.
WHITAKER     English
From an Old English place name composed of hwit "white" and aecer "acre".
WHITE     English
Originally a nickname for a person who had white hair or a pale complexion, from Old English hwit "white".
WHITNEY     English
Originally from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English.
WHITTEMORE     English
From an English place name derived from Old English hwit "white" and mor "moor, bog".
WHITTLE     English
Means "white hill".
WICKHAM     English
Habitational name from any of various places so called, for example in Cambridgeshire, Suffolk, Essex, Hertfordshire, Kent, Hampshire, Berkshire, and Oxfordshire... [more]
WILBUR     English
From the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English.
WILCOX     English
From a diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILKERSON     English
Means "son of WILKIN".
WILKIE     English
Double diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILKINS     English
Means "son of WILKIN".
WILKINSON     English
Means "son of WILKIN".
WILLARD     English
From the given name WILHEARD or WILLIHARD.
WILLIAM     English
Derived from the given name WILLIAM.
WILLIAMS     English
Means "son of WILLIAM".
WILLIAMSON     English
Means "son of WILLIAM".
WILLIS     English
Derived from the given name WILLIAM. A famous bearer of this surname is actor Bruce Willis (1955-).
WILLOUGHBY     English
From Old English wilig meaning "willow" plus Old Norse byr meaning "farm, village". The full meaning is "willow farm" or "farm in the willows".
WILMER     English
Derived from the given name WILMǢR.
WILSON     English
Means "son of WILL".
WILTON     English
From a place name meaning either "willow town" or "town on the River Wylye" in Old English. The river name is itself of Celtic origin, possibly meaning "tricky".
WINCHESTER     English
From an English place name, derived from the given name Venta, of unknown meaning, combined with Latin castra "encampment".
WINFIELD     English
From a place name derived from Old English wynn "meadow" and feld "field".
WINSHIP     English
Originally denoted a person who lived on Wincheap Street in Canterbury, England.
WINSLOW     English
Derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE".
WINSTON     English
Derived from the Old English name Wynstan meaning "joy stone".
WINTER     English, German, Swedish
From Old English winter or Old High German wintar (Middle High German winter) meaning "winter". This was the name of farmers who had to deliver their taxes in the winter and of farmers who had their fields in the north of the village.
WINTERBOTTOM     English
From bottom meaning "vale, lowland". This name probably referred to a winter pasture in a lowland valley.
WINTHROP     English
Habitational name from the place names WINTHROPE (1) or WINTHROPE (2).
WINTON     English
Derived from the name of several English villages. Their names derive from Old English meaning "enclosure belonging to WINE".
WITHERSPOON     English
Originally given to a person who dwelt at or near a sheep enclosure, Middle English wether "sheep" and spong "strip of land".
WOLF     German, English
From Middle High German or Middle English wolf meaning "wolf".
WOLFE     English
Means "wolf" either from the many Germanic names beginning with the element wolf or as a nickname.
WOMACK     English
Of uncertain origin. One theory suggests that it means "dweller by a hollow oak tree" from Old English wamb, womb meaning "hollow" and oc, ac "oak"... [more]
WOOD     English, Scottish
Originally denoted one who lived in or worked in a wood or forest, derived from Middle English wode.
WOODCOCK     English
Nickname referring to the woodcock bird.
WOODHAM     English
Means "from the home near the wood", derived from Old English wudu "wood" and ham "home".
WOODHAMS     English
Variant of WOODHAM.
WOODS     English, Scottish
Variant of WOOD.
WOODWARD     English
Occupational surname meaning "ward of the wood" or "guardian of the wood".
WOOTTON     English
Derived from Old English wadu-tun meaning "farm in or near a wood".
WORTHAM     English
Derived from a place name in Suffolk, England meaning "enclosed homestead".
WRAGGE     English
Derived from the Old Danish given name Wraghi.
WRAY     English
Denoted someone who hailed from any of the various places of that name in northern England, from Old Norse vrá meaning "corner, recess".
WRIGHT (1)     English
From Old English wryhta meaning "worker", an occupational name for someone who was a craftsman. Famous bearers were Orville and Wilbur Wright, the inventors of the first successful airplane.
WRIGHT (2)     English
Americanized form of French Le Droit, a nickname for an upright person, from Old French droit "right".
WYATT     English
From the medieval given name WYOT.
WYGHT     English
Means "agile, strong" from Middle English wiht, wight. Sometimes it can refer to people hailing from the Isle of Wight.
WYMAN (1)     English
From the Old English given name WIGMUND.
WYNDHAM     English
From a place name meaning "home belonging to Winda", from the given name Winda combined with Old English ham meaning "home". It could also come from the place called Wymondham in Norfolk, England.
WYNNE     English
Derived from the given name WINE.
YAP     English
From a nickname for a clever or cunning person, from Middle English yap meaning "devious, deceitful, shrewd".
YATES     English
From Old English geat meaning "gate", a name for a gatekeeper or someone who lived near a gate.
YONG     English
Variant of YOUNG.
YORK     English
From the name of the English city of York, which was originally called Eburacon, meaning "yew" in Brythonic, but was altered by association with Old English Eoforwic, meaning "pig farm".
YOUNG     English
Derived from Old English geong meaning "young". This was a descriptive name to distinguish father from son.
YOUNGE     English
Variant of YOUNG.
YOXALL     English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Yoxall in Staffordshire, itself derived from Old English geoc "oxen yoke" and halh "nook, recess".


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