Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is Mobyfan2001.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ACTON English, Northern Irish
"Oak Town" in Old English. Parishes in Cheshire, Suffolk, Middlesex. There is also a place that bears this name in Ulster.
BRIDGES English, Scottish
Plural of "Bridge"; dweller at the bridge.
BROOMBY English
A surname well represented in Cheshire, and Nottinghamshire.
BROWNLEE Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish, English
"Brown field" in Old English.
BROWNLEY English, Scottish
Variant spelling of "Brownlee". Brown field in Old English.
BUCKS English
Variant of "Buck"; a deer.
BUTTERY English (British)
The baker in Old English.
BUX Anglo-Saxon
From boc, meaning a beach, or beech. Sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Buxton, in Derbyshire, Buxhall, in Suffolk, or Buxted in Sussex; variant of "Buck", a deer.
CLYDE Scottish
A river in the south-west of Scotland, running through Inverclyde, Ayrshire, Dunbartonshire, Lanarkshire, and the city of Glasgow. The second longest in Scotland; and the eighth longest in the United Kingdom... [more]
CORNISH Celtic
One who came from Cornwall, a county in the South West of England.
CRAW English, Scottish, Northern Irish
One who had characteristics of a crow; sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Crawford, and Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire, Crawshawbooth in Lancashire, and Crawley in Sussex
FFROST Medieval Welsh
Devired from the old Welsh word "Ymffrostgar", meaning a brag or boastful person. Originally spelt as "Ffrost", later changed to "Frost".
FROSTENDEN Medieval English
"White hill" in Old English. Parish in Suffolk; later shortended to Frost.
GILROY Scottish Gaelic, Irish, Scottish
"Red servant" in Gaelic.
GREASBY English
One who came from Greasby, a parish on the Wirral Peninsula, in Cheshire, now Merseyside.
HAINEY Scottish Gaelic, Irish, Scottish, English
(Celtic) A lost me devil village in Scotland; or one who came from Hanney island in Berkshire.
HAM English, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
HAMES English, Welsh, Scottish
Son of "Amy", in Old English. An ancient Leicestershire surname.
HAMNER Welsh
Variant spelling of "Hanmer", parish in Flintshire.
HANMER Welsh
A Welsh topographical surname, deviring from 'Hand', a cock, and 'Mere', a lake. A parish in Flintshire, now Wrexham.
HAYMES English
Patronymic derived from the Norman given name Hamo.
LAXTON English
The lake town.
LEECH English, Scottish
A physician.
LEITCH Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
A physician in Old Scots.
LOMAS English, Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
Variant spelling of "Lomax", meaning a steam pool devoted from Lumhalghs, Lancs. Also variant spelling of "Lennox", meaning Elmwood in Gaelic.
MEED English
Dweller at the meadow.
MILLINGTON English
Parishes in Cheshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire.
MORDEN English
Parish in Surrey; one mile from Mitcham. "Moor Hollow" in Old English.
NEDD English, Welsh
Son of "Edward" in Old English.... [more]
NEEVE English, Scottish
An English surname, of Norman origin, meaning the nephew. One who was in care of their uncle. A surname first recorded in Perthshire.
PAIP Medieval Scottish, Biblical Latin, Scottish Gaelic
An ancient Caithness surname, meaning father. The family changed their name from "Paip" to "Pope".
PEGG English, Welsh
Son of "Margaret", in Old English.
PINNER English (Rare)
Parish in Middlesex.
POPPE German
German form of "Pope", meaning father.
PROSS German
Variant of "Prosser"
SEDDON English
"Broad hill" in Old English. A surname that most occurs in Merseyside, and Lancashire.
SEDON English
Variant of "Seddon"
STIGWARD Scottish, Danish, Swedish
The proper form of "Stewart"
YMFFROSTGAR Medieval Welsh
A historic Welsh surname, meaning a brag or boastful person, later shortened to Ffrost and again to Frost.