English Submitted Surnames

English names are used in English-speaking countries. See also about English names.
Filter Results       more options...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AARONSEnglish
Means "Son of Aaron."
ABARROWEnglish
At or near a barrow or tumulus.
ABBOTEnglish
Variant of Abbott.
ABBSEnglish
Derived from the given name Abel.
ABELSONEnglish
This name derives from the surname Abelson, meaning "son of Abel." Patronymic.
ABESEnglish
This is likely derived from the given name Abe(1).
ABNEYEnglish
Habitational name from a place in Derbeyshire, named Abney, from the Old English personal name Abba (with the genitive -n) and the Old English eg, meaning "island"
ABSTONEnglish (British)
The surname Abston is of an uncertain origin. Perhaps from an English place name, but not now recorded in England as a surname. One possibility is Abson near Bristol, earlier Abston; another is Adstone in Northamptonshire, which is named from an Old English personal name Ættīn + Old English tūn ‘settlement’.
ACCRINGTONEnglish
Derived from the place Accrington.
ACEEnglish, Norman, Medieval French
The surname Ace's origin is from a Norman and Old French personal name, Ace, Asse, from Germanic Frankish origin Azzo, Atso, a pet form of personal names containing adal ‘noble’ as a first element.
ACKERLEYEnglish
Old English surname which came from a place name which meant "Oak meadow." See Ackley.
ACKLEYEnglish
From an Old English surname: a place name which meant "Oak meadow". A variation of this is: "dwells at the oak tree meadow". ... [more]
ACKROYDEnglish
Topographic name from northern Middle English ake "oak" and royd "clearing".
ACTONEnglish, Northern Irish
"Oak Town" in Old English. Parishes in Cheshire, Suffolk, Middlesex. There is also a place that bears this name in Ulster.
ACYEnglish (Rare)
Possibly from the given name Ace.
ADDYEnglish
From the personal name ADDY, a medieval diminutive of ADAM. It is therefore related to the surname ADDISON.
ADIEEnglish, Scottish
From the personal name ADIE, a medieval pet form of ADAM.
ADISONEnglish
A variation of Addison, which means "Son of Addy".
ADKINSONEnglish
Variant of the surname Atkinson.
AGATEEnglish (British)
From Middle English gate, meaning a "gate" or "street", denoting a person who lived near a major city gate or street.
AGLEREnglish
From one or more Middle English personal names variously written Alger, Algar, Alcher, Aucher, etc. These represent a falling together of at least three different Continental Germanic and Old English names: Adalgar "noble spear" (Old English Æ{dh}elgār), Albgar "elf spear" (Old English Ælfgār), and Aldgar "old spear" (Old English (E)aldgār)... [more]
AIDENEnglish
Derived from the first name AIDEN.
AIKMANDutch, English, Scottish
Originally a surname or a nickname meaning oak man.
AKEMONEnglish
American variant of Aikman.
AKEYEnglish
Possibly an Americanized form of German EICHE "oak".
AKINSScottish, English, Northern Irish
Variant of Aikens, which is derived from the given name Aiken, a variant of the medieval diminutive Atkin (see Aitken).
AKRIDGEEnglish
Possibly English, a habitational name from a place with a name meaning ‘oak ridge’, as for example Aikrigg in Cumbria (from Old Norse eik ‘oak’ + hryggr ‘ridge’), or any of the many places called Oakridge (from Old English āc + hrycg)... [more]
ALABASTEREnglish
From the name of a whitish kind of gypsum used for vases, ornaments and busts, ultimately deriving from Greek alabastros, itself perhaps from Egyptian 'a-labaste "vessel of the goddess Bast"... [more]
ALBANYScottish, English (American)
From the title of the Dukes of Albany (House of Stuart), hence a name borne by their retainers. It is an infrequent surname in England and Scotland. The city of Albany, NY (formerly the Dutch settlement of Beverwijck or Fort Orange) was named for James Stuart, Duke of York and Albany; he was the brother of King Charles II and later king in his own right as James II... [more]
ALCOCKEnglish
From a diminutive of given names starting with Al-.
ALCOTTEnglish
English: ostensibly a topographic name containing Middle English cott, cote ‘cottage’ (see Coates). In fact, however, it is generally if not always an alteration of Alcock, in part at least for euphemistic reasons.
ALDERMANEnglish
Status name from Middle English alderman, Old English ealdorman, "elder". In medieval England an alderman was a member of the governing body of a city or borough; also the head of a guild.
ALDERSONEnglish (Modern)
Patronymic from the Middle English forename Alder, derived from two Old English names, Ealdhere ‘ancient army’ and Æ{dh}elhere ‘noble army’. Means "son of Aldert".
ALDERSONEnglish (Anglicized)
Son of Alder, pronounced same as the Alder tree (Ol-der)
ALDRIDGEEnglish
habitational name from a place in the West Midlands called Aldridge; it is recorded in Domesday Book as Alrewic, from Old English alor ‘alder’ + wīc ‘dwelling’, ‘farmstead’.
ALEXANDRAEnglish (Rare)
Derived from the given name Alexandra
ALFORDEnglish, Scottish
Habitation name found in Lincolnshire, Surrey and Somerset, England and Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The name can be derived by combining the Old English female personal name Ealdg- and -ford meaning "water crossing" or can mean "from the alder tree ford".
ALISTONEnglish
Variant of Allerston, a habitational surname derived from a place so named in North Yorkshire.
ALLEYEnglish, French (Anglicized)
From a Middle English personal name, Alli, Alleye, as forms such as Johannes filius Alli (Norfolk, 1205) make clear. This is of Scandinavian origin, cognate with Old Danish Alli, Old Swedish Alle... [more]
ALLINEnglish
Variant spelling of Allen. Also a derivative of the Norman female name Adelina, based on Germanic adal, 'noble'.
ALLISEnglish
From the Middle English and Old French female personal name Alis (Alice), which, together with its diminutive Alison, was extremely popular in England in the Middle Ages. The personal name is of Germanic origin, brought to England from France by the Normans; it is a contracted form of Germanic Adalhaid(is), which is composed of the elements adal "noble" and haid "brilliance, beauty".
ALLISONEnglish, Scottish
Patronymic from a Middle English male personal name, most likely ALLEN, but other possibilities include ELLIS or of a short form of ALEXANDER. ... [more]
ALLOWAYEnglish
Means (i) "person from Alloway, Alloa or Alva", the name of various places in Scotland ("rocky plain"); or (ii) from the medieval male personal name Ailwi (from Old English Æthelwīg, literally "noble battle").
ALLREDEnglish
From the Middle English personal name Alured, a form of ALFRED, which was sometimes written Alvred, especially in Old French texts.
ALMONDEnglish
From the Middle English personal name Almund, from Old English Æ{dh}elmund, "noble protection" and variant of Allman, assimilated by folk etymology to the vocabulary word denoting the tree.
ALPERTEnglish, Jewish, German, Dutch
A variant of the Jewish surname Heilprin or Halpern. In German and Dutch usage, it is derived from the given name Albert. One famous bearer is Richard Alpert from the ABC TV show LOST.
ALVORDEnglish
Derived from a variation of Ælfræd.
AMBEREnglish
This surname may be derived from the River Amber, located in Derbyshire in England.... [more]
AMBROSEEnglish
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal".
AMESEnglish, German
English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius.... [more]
AMMERGerman, English (Rare)
This surname may be derived from Middle High German amer which means "bunting (as in the bird)." As such, it is used as a nickname for someone with a fine voice or someone who is a flamboyant dresser.... [more]
AMORYEnglish, Norman
English from a Germanic personal name, Aimeri, composed of the elements haim ‘home’ + ric ‘power’. (The same elements constitute the etymology of Henry.) The name was introduced into England from France by the Normans... [more]
AMSDONEnglish (Modern)
Unknown. Possibly a spelling variant of Amsden. Ancestry.com suggests probably a habitational name, from a reduced form of the Oxfordshire place name Ambrosden, which is composed of an Old English personal name Ambre + Old English dun ‘hill’... [more]
AMYSEnglish
From the given name AMIS. Compare with AMES. An early example using this spelling is Robert Amys of Cambridgeshire, England in 1273.
ANEYEnglish
Possibly a respelling of French Ané, from a personal name derived from Latin Asinarius.
ANGELSONEnglish
Means son of Angel.
ANISTONEnglish
"Town of Agnes, Agnes town"... [more]
ANNEnglish
Habitational name from Abbots Ann in Hampshire, named for the stream that runs through it, which is most probably named with an ancient Welsh word meaning ‘water’.
ANNAEnglish, Irish, Italian, Hungarian
Probably derived from the female first name ANNA.
ANSTEYEnglish
Means "person from Anstey or Ansty", the name of numerous places in England (either "single track" or "steep track"). F. Anstey was the pen-name of British barrister and author Thomas Anstey Guthrie (1856-1934).
ANTHONYEnglish
From the personal name ANTHONY.
APELTIAEnglish (Rare)
Comes from the word "appellation" referring to the Appellation Mountains.
APPLEEnglish
From Middle English appel meaning "apple" (Old English æppel). An occupational name for a grower or seller of apples.
APPLEBEEEnglish
Variant spelling of Appleby.
APPLEGARTHEnglish, Scottish
Topographic name from northern Middle English applegarth meaning "apple orchard" (Old Norse apaldr meaning "apple tree" + gar{dh}r meaning "enclosure"), or a habitational name from a place so named, of which there are examples in Cumbria and North and East Yorkshire, as well as in the county of Dumfries.
APPLEGATEEnglish
Extremely common variant of Applegarth, in which the less familiar final element has been assimilated to the northern Middle English word gate meaning "road" or to modern English gate.
APPLEWHITEEnglish
Habitational name from a place named Applethwaite, from Old Norse apaldr ‘apple tree’ and þveit ‘meadow’. There are two or three such places in Cumbria; Applethwaite is also recorded as a surname from the 13th century in Suffolk, England, pointing to a possible lost place name there... [more]
ARABIAEnglish (American)
Americanized form of French Arabie.
ARANDSEnglish, Spanish
Anglicized version of a name given to residents of Aranda de Duero, a small town in the north of Spain.
ARBORNEEnglish (British)
A surname found in England as well as in America. This surname has been attached to Americans of English ancestry.
ARCHIBALDEnglish
From the personal name ARCHIBALD.
ARCHULETASpanish, English
Castilianized form of Basque Aretxuloeta, a topographic name meaning "oak hollow".
ARDENEnglish
From various English place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".... [more]
ARISENEnglish (Modern)
From a Dutch surname that means "son of Aris". In The Netherlands, this name is never used as a first name, since Dutch law strictly prohibits the use of surnames as first names. Therefore, if this name is indeed sometimes used as a first name in the United States (where it *is* allowed to use surnames as first names), one should classify Arisen as an (American-)English first name.
ARLINGTONEnglish
Location name that refers to a settlement associated with a personal name reduced to Arl- plus the Anglo-Saxon patronymic element -ing- then the element -ton denoting a "settlement"... [more]
ARLOTTEnglish
From a medieval nickname for a ne'er-do-well (from Middle English harlot or arlot "vagabond, base fellow"; "prostitute" is a 15th-century development). This surname was borne by Jack Arlott (1914-1991), a British journalist, poet and cricket commentator.
ARNETTEnglish
Derived from Arnold, a pet name perhaps. Also could be from /arn/ "eagle" and /ett/, a diminutive.
ARTHURSEnglish
From the given name: Arthur.
ARTISEnglish
English: regional name for someone from the French province of Artois, from Anglo-Norman French Arteis (from Latin Atrebates, the name of the local Gaulish tribe). This surname is popular in North Carolina and Virginia, of the US.
ARUNDELEnglish
English surname which comes from two distinct sources. Either it was derived from a place name meaning "horehound valley" in Old English (from harhune "horehound (a plant)" and dell "valley"), or it was from Old French arondel, diminutive of arond "swallow", which was originally a Norman nickname given to someone resembling a swallow.
ASBURYEnglish
English location name with the elements as- meaning "east" or "ash tree" and -bury meaning "fortified settlement."
ASHBYEnglish
English: habitational name from any of the numerous places in northern and eastern England called Ashby, from Old Norse askr ‘ash’ or the Old Norse personal name Aski + býr ‘farm’.
ASHCRAFTEnglish
Altered form of English Ashcroft.
ASHCROFTEnglish
English (chiefly Lancashire) topographic name from Middle English asche ‘ash tree’ + croft ‘enclosure’, or a habitational name from a minor place named with these elements.
ASHEREnglish
Topographic surname denoting someone who dwelled by an ash tree, from Middle English asche "ash tree" combined with the suffix -er.
ASHFIELDEnglish
From the English words Ash, referring to the "Ash Tree", and "Field".
ASHFORDEnglish
Derived from Ashford, which is the name of several places in England. All but one of these derive the second element of their name from Old English ford meaning "ford" - for the one in North Devon, it is derived from Old English worō or worth meaning "enclosure".... [more]
ASHLANDEnglish
This surname is derived from Old English æsc & land and it means "ash tree land."
ASHMANEnglish, Anglo-Saxon
From Middle English Asheman, a byname meaning "pirate, seaman". It can also be made up of English ash referring to the "ash tree", and man. In that case, it could refer to someone who lived by ash trees... [more]
ASHMOREEnglish
English locational name, from either "Aisemare", (from Old English pre 7th Century "aesc" meaning ash plus "mere" a lake; hence "lake where ash-trees grow), or from any of several minor places composed of the Old English elements "aesc" ash plus "mor" a marsh or fen.
ASHTONEnglish
Derived from a place name which meant "ash tree town" in Old English.
ASPINALLEnglish
A locational name of Anglo-Saxon origin, it means “aspen well”.
ASPLINEnglish
From a short form of the given name Absalom.
ASQUITHEnglish
Habitational name from a village in North Yorkshire named Askwith, from Old Norse askr ‘ash tree’ + vi{dh}r ‘wood’
ASSELBROUGHEnglish
pronouncec assel brudd the origin of the name id unknown but the family were first fiund in heworth .george asselbrough married sarah keatlie in heworth.they had george b1752-1833 alston,srag 17154c nicholas 1757 - 1813 felling pit disaster.peter 1760 james 1762,... [more]
ATELIERFrench, English
From the French atelier meaning "workshop," referring to the workplace of an artist in the fine or decorative arts, particularly during the Middle Ages and into the 19th century.
ATHENSEnglish (British)
British Artist and Violinist Faithe-Lynne Athens' last name
ATHERTONEnglish
Habitational name from a place near Manchester named Atherton, from the Old English personal name Æ{dh}elhere + Old English tūn meaning "settlement".
ATLEEEnglish
English: topographic name for someone whose dwelling was ‘by the clearing or meadow’, Middle English atte lee. The word lea or lee (Old English leah) originally meant ‘wood’, thence ‘clearing in a wood’, and, by the Middle English period, ‘grassy meadow’.
ATLEYEnglish
Variant of Atlee.... [more]
ATMOREEnglish
Locational surname derived from Middle English atte more meaning "at the marsh".
ATWELLEnglish
Topographic name from Middle English atte welle "by the spring or stream"
AUDENEnglish
This surname is derived from the Germanic given name Aldwin, of which the Old English equivalent is Ealdwine. Also compare Alden, which is a surname that has the same etymological origins. The surname Auden was probably formed during the time of the Norman French occupation of England, as Germanic names containing -al- usually became -au- in Norman French... [more]
AUDISHEnglish (British)
Audish was first found in the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk and Lincolnshire in the south of England, people who had the surname 'Audish' were wealthy landowners, thus held in high esteem.
AUGUSTUSEnglish
Means "great" or "venerable", derived from Latin augere "to increase".
AULCYEnglish
English surname, of unknown meaning.
AUSEnglish
Variant spelling of Scandinavian Aas.
AUSAGESamoan, English (Australian), American
Possibly from the given name Ausage.
AUSLEYEnglish (Modern)
Rare surname which was from an English place name in which the second element is Old English leah "wood, clearing". The first element may be hors "horse" (in which case the name likely referred to a place where horses were put out to pasture) or the river name Ouse (ultimately from the ancient British root ud- "water").
AUSTENEnglish
A variant of the surname Austin. This exact spelling is also on the first name site.
AXFORDEnglish
Derived from Axford, which is the name of two villages in England (one is located in the county of Hampshire, the other in Wiltshire). Both villages derive their name from Old English æsc(e) "ash tree(s)" and Old English ford "ford", which gives their name the meaning of "ford by the ash trees" or "a ford with ash trees"... [more]
AYDENEnglish, Scottish, Turkish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
AYLEREnglish
occupational name from Old French aillier ‘garlic seller’, from ail ‘garlic’ (from Latin allium).... [more]
AYLIFFEnglish
From the medieval female personal name Ayleve (from Old English Æthelgifu, literally "noble gift"), or from the Old Norse nickname Eilífr, literally "ever-life".
AYRESEnglish
Variant of Ayers.
AZALEAEnglish, Indonesian, Various
From the name of the flower (see Azalea). A notable bearer is Australian rapper Amethyst Amelia Kelly, who's better known by her stage name Iggy Azalea.
BABINGTONEnglish
Habitational name for someone from Babington in Somerset or Great or Little Bavington in Northumberland, named with the Old English personal name Babba + the connective particle -ing- meaning "associated with", "named after" + tūn meaning "settlement".
BACCHUSEnglish
(i) Variant of Backus (meaning "one who lives in or works in a bakery", from Old English bǣchūs "bakehouse, bakery"), the spelling influenced by Bacchus (name of the Greek and Roman god of wine).... [more]
BACKHURSTEnglish (British)
Meaning bake house or wood cutter
BACKMANEnglish, Swedish, German
Combination of Old English bakke "spine, back" and man "man". In Swedish, the first element is more likely to be derived from Swedish backe "hill", and in German the first element can be derived from German backen "to bake"... [more]
BACONEnglish, French, Norman
An occupational surname for someone who sold pork, from Middle English and Old French bacun or bacon, meaning 'bacon', which is ultimately of Germanic origin. Can also be derived from the Germanic given names Baco, Bacco, or Bahho, from the root bag-, meaning 'to fight'... [more]
BADDELEYEnglish
From place names in both Suffolk and Staffordshire derived from an Old English personal name, 'Badda,' possibly meaning "battle" and lee or leah for a "woodland clearing," therefore meaning someone from "Badda's woodland clearing."
BADRINETTEEnglish
Apparently an extremely rare name of French origin, but isn't used as a first name in France. It might come from the rather uncommon French surname Bardinette, which apparently is a variant spelling of the surname Bardinet... [more]
BAILYEnglish
Variant of Bailey.
BAINScottish, French, English
Nickname for a hospitable person from northern Middle English beyn, bayn meaning "welcoming", "friendly".... [more]
BAINBRIDGEEnglish
from Bainbridge in North Yorkshire, named for the Bain river on which it stands (which is named with Old Norse beinn ‘straight’) + bridge.
BAINEBRIDGEEnglish, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
BAIRNSFATHEREnglish
From a medieval nickname in Scotland and northern England for the (alleged) father of an illegitimate child (from northern Middle English bairnes "child's" + father). This surname was borne by British cartoonist and author Bruce Bairnsfather (1888-1959).
BAKEEnglish
Probably an occupational name for a baker.
BALCOMEnglish
Altered spelling of English Balcombe, a habitational name from Balcombe in West Sussex, which is named with Old English bealu "evil, calamity" (or the Old English personal name Bealda) combined with cumb "valley".
BALDOCKEnglish (Rare)
Means "person from Baldock", Hertfordshire ("Baghdad": in the Middle Ages the lords of the manor were the Knights Templar, whose headquarters were in Jerusalem, and they named the town Baldac, the Old French name for Baghdad).
BALDYEnglish
Possibly from an Old English female personal name, Bealdḡ{dh}, meaning ‘bold combat’, first recorded c.1170 as Baldith, and in others from the Old Norse personal name Baldi.
BALEEnglish
Variant of Bail. This is the surname of Welsh footballer Gareth Bale.
BALENEnglish
English surname, perhaps of Cornish British origin, from belen, meaning "mill."
BALLARDEnglish
English and Scottish: derogatory nickname from a derivative of bald ‘bald-headed’ (see also Bald).
BALLASTEREnglish
Meant "person who makes or is armed with a crossbow" (from a derivative of Middle English baleste "crossbow", from Old French).
BANEEnglish
Variant of Bain.
BANKSTONEnglish
Derived from the old English world "Banke" usually given to a family who lived near a hill or a slope.
BANKSYEnglish, Popular Culture
This is pseudonyms Banksy is a pseudonymous England-based graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter. Banksy's real name might be Robin Gunningham. How Banksy got his pseudonym is unknown... [more]
BANWELLEnglish
Means "person from Banwell", Somerset ("killer spring (perhaps alluding to a contaminated water source)").
BARDELLEnglish
Originally meant "person from Bardwell", Suffolk ("Bearda's spring"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mrs Bardell, Mr Pickwick's widowed landlady in Charles Dickens's 'Pickwick Papers' (1837), who misconstrues an innocent remark about having a companion as a marriage proposal, which leads to her suing Pickwick for breach of promise.
BARDENEnglish
English: habitational name from places in North and West Yorkshire named Barden, from Old English bere ‘barley’ (or the derived adjective beren) + denu ‘valley’.
BAREFOOTEnglish
English: nickname for someone who was in the habit of going about his business unshod, from Old English bær ‘bare’, ‘naked’ + fot ‘foot’. It may have referred to a peasant unable to afford even the simplest type of footwear, or to someone who went barefoot as a religious penance.In some instances, probably a translation of German Barfuss, the northern form Barfoth, or the Danish cognate Barfo(e)d.
BARHAMEnglish
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, are named with Old English beorg ‘hill’ + ham ‘homestead’. The one in Kent, however, is from an unattested Old English byname Biora, Beora (a derivative of bera ‘bear’) + ham.
BARKEREnglish
SURNAME Town cryer, or someone who shouts out notices
BARKISEnglish
Meant "person who works in a tannery" (from Middle English barkhous "tannery" - bark was used in the tanning process). A fictional bearer is Barkis, a carrier in Charles Dickens's 'David Copperfield' (1849) who sends a message via David to Clara Peggotty that "Barkis is willin'" (i.e. to marry her).
BARKUSEnglish
Probably a reduced form of Barkhouse, a topographic name for someone who lived by a tannery, Middle English barkhous, or an occupational name for someone who worked in one.
BARNABYEnglish
Either (i) means "person from Barnaby", Yorkshire ("Beornwald's settlement"); or (ii) from the medieval male personal name Barnaby, the English form of Barnabas, a biblical name ultimately from Aramaic Barnabia "son of Nabia".
BARNEREnglish
Southern English habitational name for someone who lived by a barn.
BARNETTEEnglish, French (?)
Variant of Bernet and perhaps also a variant of English Barnett, under French influence.
BARNEYEnglish
It probably came from the given name Barney, if nothing else.
BARONEnglish, French
From the title of nobility, derived from Middle English & Old French baron (ultimately of Germanic origin). Instead of referring to someone of rank, this surname referred to a service in a baronial household or a peasant with ideas above their station... [more]
BARQEnglish
Ever drank Barq's root beer?
BARRICKEnglish
Variation of Barwick.
BARRINGTONEnglish, Irish
English: habitational name from any of several places called Barrington. The one in Gloucestershire is named with the Old English personal name Beorn + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’... [more]
BARRONEnglish
Variant of BARON.
BARROWEnglish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named with Old English bearo, bearu "grove" or from Barrow in Furness, Cumbria, which is named with an unattested Celtic word, barr, here meaning "promontory", and Old Norse ey "island"... [more]
BARROWMANEnglish
A man employed in wheeling a barrow; specifically, in coal-mining, one who conveys the coal in a wheelbarrow from the point where it is mined to the trolleyway or tramway on which it is carried to the place where it is raised to the surface.
BARTHORPEEnglish
This surname originates from the village of the same name in the East Riding of Yorkshire, likely combining the Old Norse personal name Bǫrkr with Old Norse þorp meaning "village."
BARTLETTEnglish
From the Middle English personal name Bartelot, a pet form of Bartholomew.
BARTLEYEnglish, American
1. English: habitational name from Bartley in Hampshire, or from Bartley Green in the West Midlands, both of which are named with Old English be(o)rc ‘birch’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’; compare Barclay... [more]
BARWICKEnglish, German
English: habitational name from any of various places called Barwick, for example in Norfolk, Somerset, and West Yorkshire, from Old English bere ‘barley’ + wic ‘outlying farm’, i.e. a granary lying some distance away from the main village.... [more]
BASSETTEnglish
From Old French basset, which is a diminutive of basse meaning "low, short". It was either used as a nickname for a short person or someone of humble origins.
BATEMANEnglish, Scottish
Occupational name meaning ‘servant of Bate.’
BATEYEnglish (?)
Originates from mostly northern England. Is the presumed given name to fishers. (With it meaning "Small fishing boat" in old English.)
BATHGATEScottish, English
From the town of Bathgate, west of Edinburgh, Scotland. The town's name derives from Cumbric *beith, meaning 'boar' (Welsh baedd) and *gaith. meaning 'wood' (Welsh coed).
BAUCOMEnglish
Variant spelling of BALCOMBE, a habitational name from West Sussex derived from Old English bealu "evil" and cumb "valley".
BAXEnglish
Possibly a short form of Baxter, or maybe from the Anglo-Saxon word box, referring to the box tree.
BAXENDALEEnglish
Habitational name, probably an altered form of Baxenden, a place near Accrington, which is named with an unattested Old English word bæcstān meaning "bakestone" (a flat stone on which bread was baked) + denu meaning "valley"... [more]
BAYEnglish, French, Dutch, Scottish, German, Danish, Norwegian
English, French, and Dutch: nickname for someone with chestnut or auburn hair, from Middle English, Old French bay, bai, Middle Dutch bay ‘reddish brown’ (Latin badius, used originally of horses).... [more]
BAYLOREnglish
Possibly derived from the legal term bailor "one who delivers goods". It could also be a respelling of German name BEILER, an occupational name for an inspector of measures or a maker of measuring sticks... [more]
BEABEREnglish (American)
Americanized spelling of German Bieber or Biber, from Middle High German biber ‘beaver’, hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal in some way, a topographic name for someone who lived in a place frequented by beavers or by a field named with this word, or a habitational name from any of various place names in Hesse containing this element.
BEACHEnglish
Name for someone living near a beach, stream, or beech tree.
BEACHEMEnglish
Variant spelling of Beauchamp.
BEAMEnglish
From Old English beam "beam" or "post". It could be a topographic name from someone living near a post or tree, or it could be a metonymic occupational name for a weaver.... [more]
BEAMANEnglish
A beekeeper.
BEAREnglish
From the Middle English nickname Bere meaning "bear" (Old English bera, which is also found as a byname), or possibly from a personal name derived from a short form of the various Germanic compound names with this first element... [more]
BEARCUBEnglish (American, Rare)
Surname meaning a bear cub.
BEARDEnglish (American)
Nickname for a bearded man (Middle English, Old English beard). To be clean-shaven was the norm in non-Jewish communities in northwestern Europe from the 12th to the 16th century, the crucial period for surname formation... [more]
BEARDENEnglish
English habitational name, a variant of Barden, or from places in Devon and Cornwall called Beardon.
BEASEnglish
Varient spelling of the surname Bees.
BEAUCHAMPEnglish, French
From the Old French "beau, bel" meaning "fair" and "lovely" and "champ(s)" meaning "field" or "plain." It is the name of several places in France. It is also the surname of the Beauchamp Family in the hit series Witches of East End.
BEAUFOYFrench (Anglicized, Rare), English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Beaufay. Known bearers of this surname include the English astronomer and physicist Mark Beaufoy (1764-1827) and the British screenwriter Simon Beaufoy (b. 1967).
BEAUVOIREnglish
From the surname of Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986), a French feminist and philosopher.
BECKEREnglish
Occupational name for a maker or user of mattocks or pickaxes, from an agent derivative of Old English becca "mattock".
BECKETTEnglish
An Old English name simply meaning "beehive". Famous Irish playwrite Samuel Beckett bears this name.
BECKLEYEnglish
This surname was taken from an English habitational name from any of the various places, in Kent, Oxfordshire, and Sussex, named Beckley whose name was derived from the Old English byname Becca and the Old English lēah "woodland clearing".... [more]
BECKWITHEnglish (African)
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Beckwith, from Old English bece "beech" + Old Norse viðr "wood" (replacing the cognate Old English wudu).
BECRAFTEnglish (American)
English, variant of Beecroft. topographic name for someone who lived at a place where bees were kept, from Middle English bee ‘bee’ + croft ‘paddock’, ‘smallholding’.
BEDFORDEnglish
From the English county Bedfordshire and its principal city or from a small community in Lancashire with the same name. The name comes from the Old English personal name Beda, a form of the name Bede and the location element -ford meaning "a crossing at a waterway." Therefore the name indicates a water crossing once associated with a bearer of the medieval name.
BEDWORTHEnglish
An English habitational surname from a place so named near Nuneaton, in Warwickshire, derived most likely from the Old English personal name Baeda (see Bede), suffixed with worþ, 'enclosure', denoting an enclosed area of land belonging to Baeda.
BEEEnglish
From Middle English be meaning "bee", Old English beo, hence a nickname for an energetic or active person or a metonymic occupational name for a beekeeper.
BEECHEnglish
Dweller at the beech tree.
BEEDENEnglish (British)
Probably means "from Beeden", a village near Newbury in Berkshire. Ultimately coming from either Old English byden, meaning "shallow valley", or from the pre 7th century personal name Bucge with the suffix dun, meaning "hill of Bucge".
BEELEREnglish
Anglicized spelling of German BIEHLER.
BEEREnglish, German, Dutch, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of the forty or so places in southwestern England called Beer(e) or Bear(e). Most of these derive their names from the West Saxon dative case, beara, of Old English bearu ‘grove’, ‘wood’ (the standard Old English dative bearwe being preserved in Barrow)... [more]
BEIHLEnglish, German
Variant of BIEHL, a short form of BIEHLER.
BELGRAVEEnglish
Aristocratic surname from French, meaning "beautiful grove"; comes from a place name in Leicestershire. A famous namesake is British polar explorer Belgrave Ninnis, who perished in Antarctica on a 1912 expedition.
BELLEEnglish
Possibly a variant of Bell(1) or Bell(2).
BELLERSEnglish
Name came from the son of a French Noble born in Leicestershire, England. Hamon Bellers took his last name after the Kirby Bellers (Bellars) which was the name of the land given to him by his father.
BELLINGHAMEnglish
Habitational name from places called Bellingham.
BENEDICTEnglish
Of Latin origin. Due to an early association as a saint's name and a papal name, often said to mean "blessed." Originally the Latin elements are 'bene-' meaning "good" or as an adverb "well" plus '-dict,' meaning "spoken." Thus, the literal meaning is "well spoken." ... [more]
BENGTSONEnglish, Swedish
Variant of the Swedish surname Bengtsson.
BENJAMINEnglish
From the given name Benjamin.
BENNINGFIELDEnglish, Anglo-Saxon
Benningfield is believed to be either ... [more]
BENNINGTONEnglish
Habitational name from either of two places called Benington, in Hertfordshire and Lincolnshire, or from Long Bennington in Lincolnshire. The first is recorded in Domesday Book as Benintone "farmstead or settlement (Old English tūn) by the Beane river"; both Lincolnshire names are derived from the Old English personal name Beonna combined with -ing-, a connective particle denoting association, and tūn.
BENTHAMEnglish
Habitational name from any of various places named Bentham, from Old English beonet "bent grass" + ham "homestead" or hamm "enclosure hemmed in by water".
BERESFORDEnglish
English: habitational name from a place in the parish of Alstonfield, Staffordshire named Beresford, from Old English beofor ‘beaver’ (or possibly from a byname from this word) + Old English ford ‘ford’... [more]
BERKELEYEnglish
It is English and it is also a surname.
BERLINGerman, English, Swedish
Habitational name from the city in Germany, the name of which is of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from an Old Slavic stem berl- meaning swamp or from a West Slavic word meaning "river lake".... [more]
BERNEREnglish, Norman
From the Norman personal name Bernier from Old English beornan ‘to burn’, hence an occupational name for a burner of lime (compare German Kalkbrenner) or charcoal. It may also have denoted someone who baked bricks or distilled spirits, or who carried out any other manufacturing process involving burning... [more]
BERNETTScottish, English
Altered spelling of Scottish and English Burnett or French Bernet.
BERRICKEnglish
Variation of Barwick.
BERRYCLOTHEnglish (Rare)
This name is of English locational origin, from the place called Barrowclough near Halifax in West Yorkshire.
BERSFORDEnglish (Canadian)
Named after the city 'Bersford'... [more]
BESSEnglish
Popularly grown surname from the diminuative form of "Elizabeth" during any time of a Queen Elizabeth
BETHEnglish
From the given name Beth, itself a short form of Elizabeth and Bethany.
BETHELEnglish, Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Welsh ab Ithel "son of ITHEL".
BETHENCOURTFrench, English, Portuguese (Rare)
Bettencourt and Bethencourt are originally place-names in Northern France. The place-name element -court (courtyard, courtyard of a farm, farm) is typical of the French provinces, where the Frankish settlements formed an important part of the local population... [more]
BETTENCOURTFrench, English, Portuguese (Rare)
Bettencourt and Bethencourt are originally place-names in Northern France. The place-name element -court (courtyard, courtyard of a farm, farm) is typical of the French provinces, where the Frankish settlements formed an important part of the local population... [more]
BEXLEYEnglish
Habitational name from Bexley (now Bexleyheath in Greater London), which was named from Old English byxe ‘box tree’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
BIBLEEnglish
From the given name BIBEL or an altered spelling of German BIEBL.
BICKHAMEnglish
Habitational name from places so named in Devon and Somerset, most of which are most probably named with an Old English personal name Bicca and Old English cumb "valley". The first element could alternatively be from bica "pointed ridge".
BICKNELLEnglish (British)
Contracted form of the placename Bickenhill in Somerset, England.
BIDDLEEnglish, Irish
Variant of English BEADLE or German BITTEL. The name is now popular in the north east region of America, where it was brought by English and Irish immigrants.
BIGELOWEnglish
Habitational name from a place in England called Big Low meaning "big mound".
BIGGINSEnglish
Habitational name from any of the various places in England named with northern Middle English bigging "building" (from Old Norse). This word came to denote especially an outbuilding, and is still used in and around Northumberland and Cumbria.
BILLARDEnglish, German
From a short form of the personal name Robillard, a derivative of Robert.... [more]
BILLINGHAMEnglish
A surname of English origin.
BILLSONEnglish
Means "Son of Bill."
BINGHAMEnglish
Ultimately deriving from the toponym of Melcombe Bingham in Dorset. The name was taken to Ireland in the 16th century, by Richard Bingham, a native of Dorset who was appointed governor of Connaught in 1584... [more]
BINGLEYEnglish
Habitual surname for someone from Bingley in West Yorkshire, derived either from the given name Bynna or the Old English element bing meaning "hollow" and leah meaning "woodland clearing"... [more]
BINKEnglish
Topographic name for someone living by a bink, a northern dialect term for a flat raised bank of earth or a shelf of flat stone suitable for sitting on. The word is a northern form of modern English bench.
BINKSEnglish
Variant of Bink.
BIRCHEnglish, German, Danish, Swedish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a birch tree or in a birch wood, from a Germanic word meaning ‘birch’ (Old English birce ‘birch’, Middle High German birche, Old Danish birk)... [more]
BIRCHALLEnglish
Probably a habitational name from Birchill in Derbyshire or Birchills in Staffordshire, both named in Old English with birce "birch" + hyll "hill".
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13      Next Page         3,720 results (this is page 1 of 13)