German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Aacker German
Variant spelling of the surname Acker.
Abegg German, German (Swiss)
Topographic name for someone who lived near the corner of a mountain, from German ab meaning "off" and Egg, dialect form of Eck(e) meaning "promontory", "corner".
Aber German (Austrian)
Not much is known about this last name... [more]
Abplanalp German, German (Swiss)
Topographic name for someone living high on a mountainside, from German ab- "below", "off" + Planalp "high, flat mountain-meadow".
Abresch German, Dutch, Jewish
From a pet form of the Biblical name Abraham.
Ach German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a spring or stream, from Old High German aha meaning "running water".
Achenbach German
Habitational name from places in Hesse and Westphalia named Achenbach, from the obsolete word Ach or Ache (from Middle High German ahe meaning "water", "stream") + Bach meaning "brook".
Acorn German
Origin uncertain; most probably an Americanized form of German Eichhorn.
Aders German (Silesian)
Variation of Eders, a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of bare, uncultivated land, from Middle High German (o)ed(e) 'wasteland'. It may also be a habitational name from any of the numerous places named with this element.
Adolf German
From the given name Adolf.
Aebig German (Archaic)
Short form of Adalbert, used in the 16th century.
Aerni German (Swiss)
Variant spelling of Ärni.
Ahlborn German
From the old personal name Albern, from Germanic adal meaning "noble" and boran meaning "born".
Ahler German, Dutch, Danish
from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements adal ‘noble’ + hari,heri ‘army’.
Ahlschläger German
The Ahlschlager family name was found in the USA, the UK, and Canada between 1880 and 1920. The most Ahlschlager families were found in the USA in 1920. In 1880 there were 6 Ahlschlager families living in Iowa... [more]
Ahrens German, Dutch, Jewish
North German and Dutch: Patronymic from the personal name Arend (See Arndt). ... [more]
Ainstein German (Hispanicized), Spanish (Latin American)
Hispanicized form of Einstein. Most frequently used in Argentina.
Alber German
Alber family name was first found in Alsace. The nickname given to someone fair in complexion or blond haired is derived from Latin word Albanus, which means white.
Aldinger German
Habitational name for someone from Aldingen in Württemberg.
Aler English (Rare), German
From the alder tree, a tree found in the Americas, Europe and parts of Asia. The much less common given name Aler is possibly derived from it.
Alexis German, French, English, Greek
From the given name Alexis
Alleman French (Cajun), Spanish (Canarian), German
From the French and Spanish word for "German". Believed to have originated in the Alsace-Lorraine region. Some holders of the name migrated to the Canary Islands and are part of the larger Isleños population that settled throughout the Americas... [more]
Allemann German (Swiss)
Allemann (also spelled Alleman, Allemand, Aléman, Allamont, Allemagne, Alemaye, Alemán, and Allamán) is a surname that can be found primarily in Switzerland deriving from the Latin surname, Alemannus, which refers to someone of Germanic descent, specifically from the Alamanni tribe... [more]
Allenbach German, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of several places called Allenbach.
Allendorf German
Habitational name from any of ten or more places called Allendorf.
Aller German
German variant of Ahler
Allgeier German
The harried officials at Ellis Island began to assign surnames based upon the pronunciation of the name by the immigrant, rather than attempting to ferret out the actual spelling. ... [more]
Almendinger German, German (Swiss)
Habitational name for someone from a place called Allmendingen, of which there are two examples in Switzerland, in Bern canton, and one in Baden-Württemberg in Germany.
Alpert English, Jewish, German, Dutch
A variant of the Jewish surname Heilprin or Halpern. In German and Dutch usage, it is derived from the given name Albert... [more]
Alt German, Jewish
From German alt ‘old’, typically applied as a distinguishing epithet to the older of two bearers of the same personal name.
Altbauer German (Austrian)
“Old farmer” from the root Bauer meaning “farmer” in German
Alters German
Shortened form of Alterstein.
Alterstein German
Means "old stone" in German.
Althoff German
A surname predominantly found in Westphalia and the Rhineland region of Germany which is derived from German alt "old" and Hof (Hoff in the local dialects) "farmstead; farm; manor".
Altman German
Said to mean "Wise man" of German origin
Altmeyer German
Status name for an older steward, headman, or tenant farmer, as distinguished from a younger one, from Middle High German alt ‘old’ + meier ‘steward’, ‘headman’, ‘tenant farmer’
Altringer German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Altringen or Aldingen, of which there are two in Württemberg.
Alwardt German
From the personal name Adelward, composed of the Germanic elements adal ‘noble’ + ward ‘keeper’, ‘protector’.
Amberg German, Jewish
German and possibly Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several settlements called Amberg (literally ‘by the mountain’), including a city in Bavaria. It could also be a topographic name of identical etymology... [more]
Ammann German
A contraction of Ambetmann, for a court official. If there is a double "M", the origin might be Swiss.
Ammer German, English (Rare)
This surname may be derived from Middle High German amer which means "bunting (as in the bird)." As such, it is used as a nickname for someone with a fine voice or someone who is a flamboyant dresser.... [more]
Amrein German (Swiss)
Topographic name from am ‘at’ + Rain ‘edge of plowed land’.
Amsler American, German (Swiss)
As a Swiss German surname it is from the Swiss place name Amslen.
Amspacher German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Amsbach
Amstutz German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
Topographic name for someone living near or at the foot of a steep mountainside, German am Stutz ‘at the escarpment’.
Anacker German
Nickname for a day laborer, as opposed to someone who owned fields, from Middle High German āne meaning "without" + acker meaning "field".
Anders German, Scottish, Czech
Derived from the given name Anders.
Andes German
Variant spelling of Anthes.
Andrack German, Sorbian (Germanized)
Derived from a Sorbian diminutive of the given name Andreas.
Andros German (Swiss), Hungarian
Derivative of the personal name Andreas. Perhaps a reduced form of Greek Andronikos, Andronidis, or some other similar surname, all patronymics from Andreas.
Angerhofer German
Habitational name for someone from Angerhof in Bavaria.
Anheuser German
Last name of Eberhard Anheuser, founder of the Anheuser-Busch company.
Anschütz German
Occupational name for someone whose job was to keep a dam or pool filled with water. (Anschützen "to fill up")
Anselm German
From the given name Anselm.
Apfel German
Means "apple" in German.
Apfelbaum German, Jewish
Means "apple tree" in German.
Appel German, Dutch, Jewish, Low German, Medieval Dutch, Yiddish
1. German: from the personal name Appel, a pet form of Apprecht (common especially in Thuringia and Franconia), itself a variant of Albrecht... [more]
Appler German
Variant of Eppler.
Apprecht German (Rare)
Derived from the given name Albrecht.
Apt German, Yiddish
German: variant of Abt.... [more]
Arbeiter German
Occupational name from Middle High German arbeiter ‘laborer’.
Arendt German
From the given name Arnold
Arensberg German
From Old High German arn 'eagle' and berg, 'mountain'.
Arford German
Derived from town of Erfurt, Germany
Arlinghaus German
Perhaps a habitational name from Oerlinghausen in North Rhine-Westphalia.
Arndt German
Derived from the personal name Arndt.
Ärni German (Swiss)
From a much altered pet form of the personal name Arnold.
Ascher German
Derived from German asche meaning "ash" (tanners worked with ash)
Aßman German
Derived from Middle Low German asse "axle", this name used to denote an axle maker. In some cases, however, it can also be a variant of Asmussen.
Atzerodt English, German
This was the surname of George Atzerodt, a conspirator in a plot to kidnap Abraham Lincoln.
Au Upper German, Swiss, German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
South German, Swiss, and Austrian topographic name from dialect Au ‘water meadow’, ‘stream’ (see Aue).
Auerbach German, Jewish
Topographical name for someone who lived by a stream (Middle High German bach) that was near a swamp or marsh (auer).
Aufderheide German
Topographic name for someone who lived on a heath, derived from German auf der heide literally meaning "on the heath".
Aurifaber German (Latinized)
Latinised form of Goldschmidt, meaning "gold smith".
Ausländer German
Nickname given to a foreigner.
Austerlitz German (Austrian), Jewish
Derived from Slavkov u Brna (historically known as Austerlitz in German), a town located in Vyškov District, in the South Moravian Region of the Czech Republic.
Aven Scandinavian, English, German, Dutch, French (Anglicized)
Scandinavian: unexplained.... [more]
Bacharach German, Jewish
Derived from Bacharach, a town in the Mainz-Bingen district in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. This surname is borne by the American composer and pianist Burt Bacharach (1928-).
Backman English, Swedish, German
Combination of Old English bakke "spine, back" and man "man". In Swedish, the first element is more likely to be derived from Swedish backe "hill", and in German the first element can be derived from German backen "to bake"... [more]
Baechli German
South German (Bächle): Swabian variant of Bach, from a diminutive of Middle High German bach ‘stream’.
Baeder German (Austrian)
Means something like "bath house" which historically was associated with health or medicine.
Baer German
Derived from Old High German bero "bear".
Baldinger German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name for someone from a place called Baldingen, either in Württemberg, Germany, or Aargau, Switzerland.
Balsam German
Occupational name for a seller of spices and perfumes.
Balsan German
Variant of Balsam.
Balsano German (Austrian), Italian
The roots of the distinguished surname Balzano lie in Austria. The name derives itself from "Balthasar," the name of one of the three Magi who followed the star to Bethlehem, and was popular as both a first name and a family name during the 18th century.... [more]
Balson German
Variant of Balsam.
Balthazor German, German (Austrian)
A Germanic Austrian form of Balthazar
Bandy German
This interesting surname of German and Ashkenazic origin is a diminutive of the metonymic occupational name Band, originally given to someone who made the wooden hoops with which wooden barrels were fastened together, deriving from the Germanic band meaning "hoop", "band"... [more]
Baptist German, English
From the given name Baptist, or an Anglicized form of Baptiste.
Barbe German
From Middle High German barbe, the name of a species of fish resembling the carp; hence by metonymy an occupational name for a fisherman or fish dealer, or possibly a nickname for someone thought to resemble the fish in some way.
Bärg German
Variant of Berg.
Barisich German
Likely a German version of Baruch.
Bartek Polish, Czech, Slovak, German
Polish, Czech, Slovak, and eastern German: from a pet form of a vernacular form of the personal name Bartolomaeus (Czech Bartoloměj, Polish Bartłomiej, German Bartolomäus)
Bartholomäus German
From the given name Bartholomäus.
Barwick English, German
English: habitational name from any of various places called Barwick, for example in Norfolk, Somerset, and West Yorkshire, from Old English bere ‘barley’ + wic ‘outlying farm’, i.e. a granary lying some distance away from the main village.... [more]
Basel German
Derived from Božel, a diminutive of the given name Božidar.
Basel German
Habitational name denoting someone from the city of Basel, Switzerland.
Basler German
Habitational name denoting someone from the city of Basel, Switzerland.
Bastian German
From the given name Bastian.
Baszler German
Ba”s”l”r”
Bauerdick German
A surname originating from the Rhineland region of Germany. It is derived from German Bauer (Bur in the locals dialects) "farmer" and Deich (Diek and Dick in the local dialects) "levee" or Teich "pond"... [more]
Bauersack German
Semi-Germanized form of the Polish surname Burczak, originally derived from Polish burczec "growl; shout".... [more]
Bauman German, Jewish, Scandinavian
Respelling of German Baumann or Jewish (Ashkenazic) or Scandinavian spelling of the same name.
Baumeister German
Occupational name for a "builder" in German; from Middle High German 'buwen' 'to build' + meister 'master'.... [more]
Baumkötter German (Modern)
From the German words 'Baum' meaning 'tree' and 'Kötter' a type of villager who dwelt in a cottage, similar to the Scottish Cotter. "Presumably a 'Baumkötter' earned money from a small orchard on their property."
Bay German
From the given name Baio.
Bayers German
Variant of Bayer.
Beamer German (Americanized)
Americanized spelling of German Böhmer or Bäumer.
Beas German
Possibly also a variant spelling of German Bies.
Bechdel German
Variant of German Bechtel. ... [more]
Becher German
Shortened form of Becherer as well as a surname given to for someone who distilled or worked with pitch, in which case it is derived from Middle High German bech / pech "pitch".
Bechmann German (Rare)
Surname denoting someone who worked with pitch, from Middle High German bech / pech "pitch" and man, a suffix which can mean "man" or simply be used as a name suffix.
Bedsaul German
Americanized form of the German surname Petzold, which comes from a Slavic pet form of the name Peter.
Beekman German, Anglo-Saxon
This name derives from the pre 5th century Olde German and later Anglo-Saxon word "bah" or "baecc". This word describes a stream, or as a name specifically someone who lived or worked by a stream.
Beer English, German, Dutch, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of the forty or so places in southwestern England called Beer(e) or Bear(e). Most of these derive their names from the West Saxon dative case, beara, of Old English bearu ‘grove’, ‘wood’ (the standard Old English dative bearwe being preserved in Barrow)... [more]
Beery Irish, German (Swiss), Dutch, Hungarian
Possibly a reduced variant of Irish O'Berry, or Americanized form of Swiss German Bieri, Hungarian Béry and Dutch Baars... [more]
Beh German
Possibly a variant of Boehm.
Behn German
From the German male personal name Behn, a shortened form of Bernhard. A famous bearer was the English novelist and dramatist Aphra Behn (1640-1689).
Behnen German
Derived from the given name Bernhard.
Behr German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of the personal name Bähr (see Baer).
Behrendt German
Dutch and North German surname which is a variant of Behrend.
Behringer German
Habitational name for someone from either of two places called Behringen, near Soltau and in Thuringia, or from Böhringen in Württemberg.
Beier German
Variant of Bayer.
Beihl English, German
Variant of Biehl, a short form of BIEHLER.
Beilschmidt German
means "Axe Smith" in german
Beining German
This famous surname, one of the earliest recorded in history, and recorded in over two hundred spellings from Benedicte, Benech and Bennet, to Banish, Beinosovitch and Vedyasov, derives from the Roman personal name "Benedictus", meaning blessed.
Beisel German
German:... [more]
Bellmann German
Habitational name derived from places in Germany named either Bell, Belle, or Bellen.
Belzer German
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative of Middle High German bel(li)z "fur"
Bender German, German (East Prussian)
As a German surname, Bender is a regional occupational surname from the Rhineland area denoting a "barrel-maker" (the Standard German Fassbinder became "Fassbender" in the local dialects and ultimately was shortened to Bender).... [more]
Benedikt German
From the given name Benedikt.
Benner German
Occupational name for a basket and bassinet maker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German benne 'work basket', 'bassinet', 'cradle'.
Bens Dutch, German
Patronymic from a short form of Bernhard.
Bents German
Variant of Benz.
Benz German
South German: (in Alemannic areas) from a short form of the Germanic personal name Berthold, or to a lesser extent of Bernhard
Berber German
Possibly a habitational name from a place called Berber near Kevelaer.
Berentzen German
The surname is derived from the given name Bernd and was formerly written "Bernd sin Sohn" which meant "son of Bernd"... [more]
Bergdorf German
Origin unidentified. Possibly a German habitational name from places in Hamburg and Lower Saxony called Bergedorf, Bargdorf in Lower Saxony, or Bergsdorf in Brandenburg.
Bergen German, Dutch, Flemish, Jewish
Originally denoted a person from any of the various places named Bergen in Germany and the Netherlands. It is also a variant of Berg. Famous bearers include the Americans Candice Bergen (1946-), an actress, and Polly Bergen (1930-2014), an actress, singer and television host.
Berghold German
Surname that denoted the owner of a vineyard.
Bergholtz Swedish, German (Rare)
Possibly a variant of German Bergholz which is either a derivative of Berchtold or from a topographic name meaning "birch wood"... [more]
Berghorst German
Topographical name for someone who lived by a wilderness area on a mountain, from Berg 'mountain', 'hill' + Horst 'wilderness' (see Horst).
Berlin German, English
Habitational name from the city in Germany, the name of which is of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from an Old Slavic stem berl- meaning swamp or from a West Slavic word meaning "river lake".
Berlinerblau German, Jewish
Means “Prussian blue” in German. A notable bearer of this surname is Jacques Berlinerblau, a professor of Jewish civilization, and Stefania Berlinerblau, an American anatomist and physician.
Bern German, Scandinavian, German (Swiss)
German and Scandinavian: from the personal name Berno, a pet form of Bernhard. In South German it comes from the habitational name from Bern, Switzerland, notably in the south; in other parts from the personal name Berno.
Bernath German, English
Derived from the name Bernhard.
Berner German, Low German
German habitational name, in Silesia denoting someone from a place called Berna (of which there are two examples); in southern Germany and Switzerland denoting someone from the Swiss city of Berne. ... [more]
Bernfield German
An Americanized variant of the German surname, "Bergfeld", meaning "mountain field".
Bernitt German (Rare)
Derived from the name of Bernitt, a municipality in the Rostock district, in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.
Bernius German (Latinized), Lithuanian
German-Latinized form of Berner.... [more]
Berschel German
German form of Burchell.
Berthold German
From the given name Berthold.
Bertram German
Derived from the German given name Bertram.
Berwald German, Swedish (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Originally derived from the given name Bernwald, composed of Old High German bern, bero "bear" and wald "ruler"... [more]
Besemer German
Occupational name meaning "broom maker".
Beske German
Likely derived from Peschke and Peske, vernacular forms of the given name Petrus.
Bessel German
Of uncertain origin; possibly from the name of a place or river.
Besselman German
Derived from the German surname Bessel + suffix man "man".
Betz German
Derived from a Thuringian short form of the personal name Bernhard.
Bever German
Nickname from bever ‘beaver’, possibly referring to a hard worker, or from some other fancied resemblance to the animal.
Bey French, German, Frisian
North German and Frisian: from the Old Frisian personal name Beyo or Boy/Boye (see Boye).... [more]
Bhaer German
Likely a variant of German Baer, meaning "bear". A notable bearer is character Friedrich Bhaer, Jo's husband in Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.
Bhole German
1 North German: nickname for a male relative, colleague in a guild or fraternity, or lover, Middle Low German bōle.... [more]
Biber German
Varient of Bieber.
Bickel German, German (Swiss), Jewish
German: from bickel ‘pickaxe’ or ‘chisel’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who made pickaxes or worked with a pickaxe or for a stonemason. South German: from a pet form of Burkhart... [more]
Biebrich German
Town of Biebrich Germany
Biehl German
From Middle Low German bil "hatchet", Middle High German biel; given to someone who made or used hatchets.
Bieler German, Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of the many places in eastern Europe whose name incorporates the Slavic element byel- ‘white’.... [more]
Bierbaum German
German: topographic name for someone who lived by a pear tree, Middle Low German berbom. Compare Birnbaum.
Bierkle German (Anglicized), Polish (Anglicized)
The surname Bierkle is most likely an anglicized form of the Polish Bierkowski, or the German Bierkandt.... [more]
Bierschbach German
German habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
Bilderback German (Modern, Archaic)
German: habitational name from any of the three places in northern Germany named Billderbeck, formerly Bilderbeck.... [more]
Billard English, German
From a short form of the personal name Robillard, a derivative of Robert.... [more]
Billig German
Habitational name from a place named Billig, near Cologne. Nickname from Middle High German billich ‘proper’, ‘appropriate’.
Binder German
From an agent derivative of binden "to bind".
Binderman German
From an occupation, a variant of Binder.
Bingel German
A topographic name derived from a diminutive of Middle High German binge, which means "depression", "ditch", or "pit". May also be derived from pingel, which is a Westphalian nickname for a pedantic person.
Bingemann German (Rare)
Possibly a habitational name for someone from a place named Bingen or Bingum. May also be from a topographic name derived from the German word Binge, which means "trench", and may also refer to a kettle-shaped depression or a collapsed shaft in a mine (see Bingel).
Birch English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare)
From Middle High German birche, Old English birce, Old Danish birk, all meaning "birch". This was likely a topographic name for someone living by a birch tree or a birch forest... [more]
Birk German
Either a variant of Buerk or a habitational name derived from places named Birk, Birke, or Birken.
Birnbaum German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a pear tree, from Middle High German bir "pear" and boum "tree".
Birne English, German, Jewish
Means "pear" in German, making it the German equivalent of Perry 1, perhaps originally referring to a person who harvested or sold pears... [more]
Birnfeld German (Portuguese-style, Rare, Expatriate)
Meaning “pear field” from the German words “birne”, meaning pear, and the word “feld”, meaning field.
Bischoffshausen German, German (Austrian), German (Swiss)
Means "bishop's house" in German
Bismarck German
Noble family from the Altmark Region.
Bittenbinder German
Occupational name for a cooper, from Middle High German büte(n) "cask", "(wine) barrel" + binder "binder" (agent derivative of binden "to bind").
Bitterman English, German
Name given to a person who was bitter.
Blakesmith German (Anglicized)
Derived from the German, Blechschmidt, it means "tin smith", and/or, blacksmith.
Blankenbeckler German
German: variant of Blankenbacher ( see Blankenbaker ).
Blankenstein German, Jewish
From German blanken meaning "bare" and stein meaning "stone".
Blase German
Derivative of Blasius.
Blasius German, Dutch, Scandinavian
From the Latin personal name Blasius. This was a Roman family name, originating as a byname for someone with some defect, either of speech or gait, from Latin blaesus "stammering" (compare Greek blaisos "bow-legged")... [more]
Blatt German, Jewish
Ornamental name derived from German blatt and Yiddish blat meaning "leaf", or a topographic name for someone who lived at a farm on a ledge on a mountainside, derived from Middle High German blate meaning "flat surface, ledge, plateau".
Blaum German
German last name, likely a variant of the last name Blom or Blum, referring to the word flower/blooming.
Blaustein German, Jewish
Ornamental name from German blau "blue" and Stein "stone", i.e. lapis lazuli.
Bleibaum German
"Lead tree" possibly changed at Ellis Island from Blumenbaum meaning "flowering tree"
Blitstein German, Jewish
Stein is the German word for stone.
Blitz German
This surname is presumed to be coming from a nickname for a fast runner or a quick tempered person, from German blitz(er) meaning "lightning" (ultimately from Middle High German blicze.)
Blitzstein German, Jewish
Blitz is the German word for lightening and stein is the German word for stone.
Blöcker German
Occupational name for a jailer.
Bluestein German
The surname Bluestein is an Anglicized surname and translates as blue stone.
Bluhm German
German alternate spelling of the Italian surname, Blum meaning flower.
Blume German, English
Could be from the Jewish surname Blum of from Swedish Blom. It could also be from the English word bloom.
Blumenkrantz German, Jewish
Means "flower-wreath" in German.
Blumreisinger German (Anglicized)
Meaning "flower raiser". See also Blum.
Bluth German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): ornamental name from Middle High German bluot, German Blüte ‘bloom’, ‘flower head’. ... [more]
Bobeck Swedish, German, Jewish, Slavic
A respelling of the Swedish Bobäck, an ornamental name composed of the elements bo meaning "farm" and bäck meaning "stream".... [more]
Bock German, Upper German, Jewish, English
Altered spelling of German Böck (see Boeck) or Bach.... [more]
Bockelmann German
Possibly derived from the name Bockel, a place in Germany. A famous bearer is Udo Jürgens (1934-2014), an Austrian musician, born Jürgen Udo Bockelmann.
Bodeman German
Bodeman is an occupational name meaning "adherent of the royal messenger".
Boden German, Low German
Patronymic from the personal name Bode or a topographic name for someone living in a valley bottom or the low-lying area of a field. From Middle High German boden "ground, bottom".
Bodin German (Rare)
Likely derived from various Germanic personal names containing the name element Bod meaning "messenger". Another theory is that the name could be derived from any of the several places named Boddin in Germany.
Boehme German
Variant of Böhm
Boehmer German
Variant of Böhm
Boehner German
Variant form of Bohner.
Boesel German
Habitational name, from Bösel