German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AACKER German
Variant spelling of the surname Acker.
ABEGG German, German (Swiss)
Topographic name for someone who lived near the corner of a mountain, from German ab meaning "off" and Egg, dialect form of Eck(e) meaning "promontory", "corner".
ABPLANALP German, German (Swiss)
Topographic name for someone living high on a mountainside, from German ab- "below", "off" + Planalp "high, flat mountain-meadow".
ABRESCH German, Dutch, Jewish
From a pet form of the Biblical name Abraham.
ABSHER German
Absher comes from either the German surname Habich, which comes from the surname hawk. Literally meaning someone who had hawk-like features.
ACH German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a spring or stream, from Old High German aha meaning "running water".
ACHENBACH German
Habitational name from places in Hesse and Westphalia named Achenbach, from the obsolete word Ach or Ache (from Middle High German ahe meaning "water", "stream") + Bach meaning "brook".
ACORN German
Origin uncertain; most probably an Americanized form of German Eichhorn.
ADERS German (Silesian)
Variation of Eders, a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of bare, uncultivated land, from Middle High German (o)ed(e) 'wasteland'. It may also be a habitational name from any of the numerous places named with this element.
AEBIG German (Archaic)
Short form of Adalbert, used in the 16th century.
AERNI German (Swiss)
Variant spelling of Ärni.
AHLBORN German
From the old personal name Albern, from Germanic adal meaning "noble" and boran meaning "born".
ALBAUGH German (Austrian)
Albaugh is a surname of Austrian origin. It is an anglicized variation of the German language surname Albach.
ALDINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Aldingen in Württemberg.
ALLEMAN French (Cajun), Spanish (Canarian), German
From the French and Spanish word for "German". Believed to have originated in the Alsace-Lorraine region. Some holders of the name migrated to the Canary Islands and are part of the larger Isleños population that settled throughout the Americas... [more]
ALLEMANN German (Swiss)
Allemann (also spelled Alleman, Allemand, Aléman, Allamont, Allemagne, Alemaye, Alemán, and Allamán) is a surname that can be found primarily in Switzerland deriving from the Latin surname, Alemannus, which refers to someone of Germanic descent, specifically from the Alamanni tribe... [more]
ALLENBACH German, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of several places called Allenbach.
ALLENDORF German
Habitational name from any of ten or more places called Allendorf.
ALLGEIER German
The harried officials at Ellis Island began to assign surnames based upon the pronunciation of the name by the immigrant, rather than attempting to ferret out the actual spelling. ... [more]
ALMENDINGER German, German (Swiss)
Habitational name for someone from a place called Allmendingen, of which there are two examples in Switzerland, in Bern canton, and one in Baden-Württemberg in Germany.
ALPERT English, Jewish, German, Dutch
A variant of the Jewish surname Heilprin or Halpern. In German and Dutch usage, it is derived from the given name Albert. One famous bearer is Richard Alpert from the ABC TV show LOST.
ALSCHEID German
Probably originally a locational surname and a place name for a village which no longer exists. Alscheid (Luxembourgish: Alschent) is a village in the commune of Kiischpelt, in northern Luxembourg. As of 2001, the village had a population of 47.... [more]
ALT German, Jewish
From German alt ‘old’, typically applied as a distinguishing epithet to the older of two bearers of the same personal name.
ALTBAUER German (Austrian)
“Old farmer” from the root Bauer meaning “farmer” in German
ALTERS German
Shortened form of Alterstein.
ALTERSTEIN German
Means "old stone" in German.
ALTHOFF German
A surname predominantly found in Westphalia and the Rhineland region of Germany which is derived from German alt "old" and Hof (Hoff in the local dialects) "farmstead; farm; manor".
ALTMAN German
Said to mean "Wise man" of German origin
ALTMEYER German
Status name for an older steward, headman, or tenant farmer, as distinguished from a younger one, from Middle High German alt ‘old’ + meier ‘steward’, ‘headman’, ‘tenant farmer’
ALTRINGER German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Altringen or Aldingen, of which there are two in Württemberg.
ALWARDT German
From the personal name Adelward, composed of the Germanic elements adal ‘noble’ + ward ‘keeper’, ‘protector’.
AMBERG German, Jewish
German and possibly Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several settlements called Amberg (literally ‘by the mountain’), including a city in Bavaria. It could also be a topographic name of identical etymology... [more]
AMES English, German
English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius.... [more]
AMMANN German
A contraction of Ambetmann, for a court official. If there is a double "M", the origin might be Swiss.
AMMER German, English (Rare)
This surname may be derived from Middle High German amer which means "bunting (as in the bird)." As such, it is used as a nickname for someone with a fine voice or someone who is a flamboyant dresser.... [more]
AMREIN German (Swiss)
Topographic name from am ‘at’ + Rain ‘edge of plowed land’.
AMSLER American, German (Swiss)
As a Swiss German surname it is from the Swiss place name Amslen.
AMSPACHER German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Amsbach
AMSTUTZ German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
Topographic name for someone living near or at the foot of a steep mountainside, German am Stutz ‘at the escarpment’.
ANACKER German
Nickname for a day laborer, as opposed to someone who owned fields, from Middle High German āne meaning "without" + acker meaning "field".
ANDERS German, Scottish, Czech
Derived from the given name Anders.
ANDES German
Variant spelling of Anthes.
ANDROS German (Swiss), Hungarian
Derivative of the personal name Andreas. Perhaps a reduced form of Greek Andronikos, Andronidis, or some other similar surname, all patronymics from Andreas.
ANGERHOFER German
Habitational name for someone from Angerhof in Bavaria.
ANHEUSER German
Last name of Eberhard Anheuser, founder of the Anheuser-Busch company.
ANSCHÜTZ German
Occupational name for someone whose job was to keep a dam or pool filled with water. (Anschützen "to fill up")
APPEL German, Dutch, Jewish, Low German, Medieval Dutch, Yiddish
1. German: from the personal name Appel, a pet form of Apprecht (common especially in Thuringia and Franconia), itself a variant of Albrecht. ... [more]
APPLER German
Variant of Eppler.
APT German, Yiddish
German: variant of Abt.... [more]
ARBEITER German
Occupational name from Middle High German arbeiter ‘laborer’.
ARENSBERG German
From Old High German arn 'eagle' and berg, 'mountain'.
ARFORD German
Derived from town of Erfurt, Germany
ARLINGHAUS German
Perhaps a habitational name from Oerlinghausen in North Rhine-Westphalia.
ARNDT German
Derived from the personal name Arndt.
ÄRNI German (Swiss)
From a much altered pet form of the personal name Arnold.
ASCHER German
Derived from German asche meaning "ash" (tanners worked with ash)
AßMAN German
Derived from the given name Erasmus + the... [more]
AU Upper German, Swiss, German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
South German, Swiss, and Austrian topographic name from dialect Au ‘water meadow’, ‘stream’ (see Aue).
AUERBACH German, Jewish
Topographical name for someone who lived by a stream (Middle High German bach) that was near a swamp or marsh (auer).
AUSSENDORF German
Originated in Germany. Means "Out of the Village". First used in the year 1135.
AUT Czech, German (Swiss), Russian, Catalan
Means "Hard Worker" in Czech.... [more]
BACKMAN English, Swedish, German
Combination of Old English bakke "spine, back" and man "man". In Swedish, the first element is more likely to be derived from Swedish backe "hill", and in German the first element can be derived from German backen "to bake"... [more]
BAEDER German (Austrian)
Means something like "bath house" which historically was associated with health or medicine.
BAER German
Derived from Old High German bero "bear".
BAERTSCH German
Means "loyalty".
BALSAM German
Occupational name for a seller of spices and perfumes.
BALSAN German
Variant of Balsam.
BALSANO German (Austrian), Italian
The roots of the distinguished surname Balzano lie in Austria. The name derives itself from "Balthasar," the name of one of the three Magi who followed the star to Bethlehem, and was popular as both a first name and a family name during the 18th century.... [more]
BALSON German
Variant of Balsam.
BARBE German
From Middle High German barbe, the name of a species of fish resembling the carp; hence by metonymy an occupational name for a fisherman or fish dealer, or possibly a nickname for someone thought to resemble the fish in some way.
BÄRG German
Variant of Berg.
BARISICH German
Likely a German version of Baruch.
BARNER Low German
North German derivative of the old Germanic personal name Barnher or Bernher (see Berner).
BARTEK Polish, Czech, Slovak, German
Polish, Czech, Slovak, and eastern German: from a pet form of a vernacular form of the personal name Bartolomaeus (Czech Bartoloměj, Polish Bartłomiej, German Bartolomäus)
BARWICK English, German
English: habitational name from any of various places called Barwick, for example in Norfolk, Somerset, and West Yorkshire, from Old English bere ‘barley’ + wic ‘outlying farm’, i.e. a granary lying some distance away from the main village.... [more]
BAUERDICK German
A surname originating from the Rhineland region of Germany. It is derived from German Bauer (Bur in the locals dialects) "farmer" and Deich (Diek and Dick in the local dialects) "levee" or Teich "pond"... [more]
BAUERSACK German
Semi-Germanized form of the Polish surname Burczak, originally derived from Polish burczec "growl; shout".... [more]
BAUGHER German
Means peasant farmer in German.
BAUMKÖTTER German (Modern)
From the German words 'Baum' meaning 'tree' and 'Kötter' a type of villager who dwelt in a cottage, similar to the Scottish Cotter. "Presumably a 'Baumkötter' earned money from a small orchard on their property."
BAY German
From the given name Baio.
BAYERS German
Variant of Bayer.
BEAS German
Possibly also a variant spelling of German Bies.
BECHER German
Shortened form of Becherer as well as a surname given to for someone who distilled or worked with pitch, in which case it is derived from Middle High German bech / pech "pitch".
BECHMANN German (Rare)
Surname denoting someone who worked with pitch, from Middle High German bech / pech "pitch" and man, a suffix which can mean "man" or simply be used as a name suffix.
BEDSAUL German
Americanized form of the German surname Petzold, which comes from a Slavic pet form of the name Peter.
BEEKMAN German, Anglo-Saxon
This name derives from the pre 5th century Olde German and later Anglo-Saxon word "bah" or "baecc". This word describes a stream, or as a name specifically someone who lived or worked by a stream.
BEER English, German, Dutch, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of the forty or so places in southwestern England called Beer(e) or Bear(e). Most of these derive their names from the West Saxon dative case, beara, of Old English bearu ‘grove’, ‘wood’ (the standard Old English dative bearwe being preserved in Barrow)... [more]
BEHN German
From the German male personal name Behn, a shortened form of Bernhard. A famous bearer was the English novelist and dramatist Aphra Behn (1640-1689).
BEHNEN German
Derived from the given name Bernhard.
BEHR German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of the personal name Bähr (see Baer).
BEHRENDT German
Dutch and North German surname which is a variant of Behrend.
BEHRINGER German
Habitational name for someone from either of two places called Behringen, near Soltau and in Thuringia, or from Böhringen in Württemberg.
BEIHL English, German
Variant of BIEHL, a short form of BIEHLER.
BEILSCHMIDT German
means "Axe Smith" in german
BEINING German
This famous surname, one of the earliest recorded in history, and recorded in over two hundred spellings from Benedicte, Benech and Bennet, to Banish, Beinosovitch and Vedyasov, derives from the Roman personal name "Benedictus", meaning blessed.
BELZER German
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative of Middle High German bel(li)z "fur"
BENDER German, German (East Prussian)
As a German surname, Bender is a regional occupational surname from the Rhineland area denoting a "barrel-maker" (the Standard German Fassbinder became "Fassbender" in the local dialects and ultimately was shortened to Bender).... [more]
BENNING German
From the Germanic name Berno, which was derived from Old German "bero", meaning bear.
BENS Dutch, German
Patronymic from a short form of Bernhard.
BENTS German
Variant of Benz.
BENZ German
South German: (in Alemannic areas) from a short form of the Germanic personal name Berthold, or to a lesser extent of Bernhard
BERBER German
Possibly a habitational name from a place called Berber near Kevelaer.
BERENTZEN German
The surname is derived from the given name Bernd and was formerly written "Bernd sin Sohn" which meant "son of Bernd". The spelling Berentzen developped through the years.
BERGDORF German
Origin unidentified. Possibly a German habitational name from places in Hamburg and Lower Saxony called Bergedorf, Bargdorf in Lower Saxony, or Bergsdorf in Brandenburg.
BERGHOLD German
Surname that denoted the owner of a vineyard.
BERGMANN German, Swedish (Rare)
German variant of BERG combined with the suffix mann "man".
BERLIN German, English
Habitational name from the city in Germany, the name of which is of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from an Old Slavic stem berl- meaning swamp or from a West Slavic word meaning "river lake".
BERN German, Scandinavian, German (Swiss)
German and Scandinavian: from the personal name Berno, a pet form of Bernhard. In South German it comes from the habitational name from Bern, Switzerland, notably in the south; in other parts from the personal name Berno.
BERNER German, Low German
German habitational name, in Silesia denoting someone from a place called Berna (of which there are two examples); in southern Germany and Switzerland denoting someone from the Swiss city of Berne. ... [more]
BERNFIELD German
An Americanized variant of the German surname, "Bergfeld", meaning "mountain field".
BERNIUS German (Latinized), Lithuanian
German-Latinized form of Berner.... [more]
BERTRAM German
Derived from the German given name Bertram.
BERWALD German, Swedish (Rare), Danish (Rare)
Originally derived from the given name Bernwald, composed of Old High German bern, bero "bear" and wald "ruler". Later altered to Bärwald "bear forest", from German Bär "bear" and Wald "forest"... [more]
BESEMER German
Occupational name meaning "broom maker".
BESKE German
Likely derived from Peschke and Peske, vernacular forms of the given name Petrus.
BESSEL German
Of uncertain origin; possibly from the name of a place or river.
BESSELMAN German
Derived from the German surname BESSEL + suffix man "man".
BETZ German
Derived from a Thuringian short form of the personal name Bernhard.
BEVER German
Nickname from bever ‘beaver’, possibly referring to a hard worker, or from some other fancied resemblance to the animal.
BEY French, German, Frisian
North German and Frisian: from the Old Frisian personal name Beyo or Boy/Boye (see Boye).... [more]
BHAER German
Likely a variant of German BAER, meaning "bear". A notable bearer is character Friedrich Bhaer, Jo's husband in Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.
BIBER German
Varient of Bieber.
BICKEL German, German (Swiss), Jewish
German: from bickel ‘pickaxe’ or ‘chisel’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who made pickaxes or worked with a pickaxe or for a stonemason. South German: from a pet form of Burkhart... [more]
BIEBRICH German
Town of Biebrich Germany
BIELER German, Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of the many places in eastern Europe whose name incorporates the Slavic element byel- ‘white’.... [more]
BIERBAUM German
German: topographic name for someone who lived by a pear tree, Middle Low German berbom. Compare Birnbaum.
BIERKLE German (Anglicized), Polish (Anglicized)
The surname Bierkle is most likely an anglicized form of the Polish Bierkowski, or the German Bierkandt.... [more]
BILDERBACK German (Modern, Archaic)
German: habitational name from any of the three places in northern Germany named Billderbeck, formerly Bilderbeck.... [more]
BILLARD English, German
From a short form of the personal name Robillard, a derivative of Robert.... [more]
BINDER German
From an agent derivative of binden "to bind".
BIRCH English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare)
From Middle High German birche, Old English birce, Old Danish birk, all meaning "birch". This was likely a topographic name for someone living by a birch tree or a birch forest... [more]
BIRK German
Either a variant of Buerk or a habitational name derived from places named Birk, Birke, or Birken.
BIRKE Low German, Swedish (Rare)
Variant of Birk. Perhaps a shortened form of any of various Danish and Norwegian surnames beginning with Birke-, for example Birkeland and Birkelund ("birch grove").
BIRNBAUM German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a pear tree, from Middle High German bir "pear" and boum "tree".
BISCHOFFSHAUSEN German, German (Austrian), German (Swiss)
Means "bishop's house" in German
BITTENBINDER German
Occupational name for a cooper, from Middle High German büte(n) "cask", "(wine) barrel" + binder "binder" (agent derivative of binden "to bind").
BITTERMAN English, German
Name given to a person who was bitter.
BLAKESMITH German (Anglicized)
Derived from the German, Blechschmidt, it means "tin smith", and/or, blacksmith.
BLASIUS German, Dutch, Scandinavian
From the Latin personal name Blasius. This was a Roman family name, originating as a byname for someone with some defect, either of speech or gait, from Latin blaesus "stammering" (compare Greek blaisos "bow-legged")... [more]
BLAUM German
German last name, likely a variant of the last name Blom or Blum, referring to the word flower/blooming.
BLAUSTEIN German, Jewish
Ornamental name from German blau "blue" and Stein "stone", i.e. lapis lazuli.
BLITZ German
This surname is presumed to be coming from a nickname for a fast runner or a quick tempered person, from German blitz(er) meaning "lightning" (ultimately from Middle High German blicze.)
BLUHM German
German alternate spelling of the Italian surname, Blum meaning flower.
BLUME German, English
Could be from the Jewish surname Blum of from Swedish Blom. It could also be from the English word bloom.
BLUMREISINGER German (Anglicized)
Meaning "flower raiser". See also Blum.
BLUTH German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): ornamental name from Middle High German bluot, German Blüte ‘bloom’, ‘flower head’. ... [more]
BOCK German, Upper German, Jewish, English
Altered spelling of German Böck (see Boeck) or Bach.... [more]
BODEMAN German
Bodeman is an occupational name meaning "adherent of the royal messenger".
BODEN German, Low German
Patronymic from the personal name BODE or a topographic name for someone living in a valley bottom or the low-lying area of a field. From Middle High German boden "ground, bottom".
BODIN German
Probably derived from various Germanic personal names beginning with Bod- "messenger", or from the habitational name Boddin, name of several places in Mecklenburg and Brandenburg.
BOEHM German, Dutch, Jewish
Ethnic name for a native or inhabitant of Bohemia (now the western part of the Czech Republic), from Böhmen, German name of Bohemia (Middle High German Böheim, Beheim). This derives its name from the tribal name Baii + heim "homeland"; the Baii were a tribe, probably Celtic, who inhabited the region in the 1st century A.D. and were gradually displaced by Slavic settlers in the period up to the 5th century... [more]
BOESEL German
Habitational name, from Bösel
BOETTCHER German
Occupational name for a cooper, from Middle High German botecher, bötticher, bütticher, an agent derivative of botech(e), bottich, bütte "vat", "barrel".
BOIS French, German
From French bois "forest"
BOLD German, English
English: nickname from Middle English bold ‘courageous’, ‘daring’ (Old English b(e)ald, cognate with Old High German bald). In some cases it may derive from an Old English personal name (see Bald)... [more]
BOLDING English, German
Patronymic from Bold as a personal name.
BOLDT German
From the Germanic personal name Baldo, a short form of the various compound names with the first element bald ‘bold’.
BOLT Danish, German
Variant of Boldt.
BONGARD German, French
In german a rhenish place name "Obstgarten" (orchard).... [more]
BONUS French, German, Dutch
Humanistic Latinization of vernacular names meaning ‘good’, for example French Lebon or Dutch de Goede
BOOMHOUWER German, Dutch
Boomhouwer, means "Cutter of Trees", or "The one who hews trees", having Boom translating into "tree", houw meaning to "hew" or to "cut", and er meaning "the one who".... [more]
BOOT English, Dutch, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of boots, from Middle English, Old French bote (of unknown origin).... [more]
BOOTS English, Dutch, German
A variant of Boot meaning "shoemaker" in English or "boatman" in Dutch or German.
BORCHERT German, English
Variant of Borchardt (see BURKHARD).
BOREN German
Of unclear origin, most likely a variant of the German surname Born.
BORMAN Dutch, Low German, English
Dutch and North German: variant of Bormann. ... [more]
BORMANN German
This surname is presumed to be a variant of Bornemann, which is made up of Middle Low German born meaning "spring" and man meaning "man," denoting someone who lived by a spring or a well.
BORNEMANN Low German
North German: topographic name denoting someone who lived by a well or spring, from Middle Low German born ‘spring’, ‘well’ + man ‘man’.
BORSOK Russian, Jewish, German (Austrian)
Pronouced "Boar-sook"... [more]
BOYE English, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From the Germanic given names Boio or Bogo, which are of uncertain origin. Also possibly a variant of Bothe.
BRÄGER German
Habitational name for someone from Bräg in Bavaria.
BRANDENBURG German (East Prussian, Rare)
From a state in eastern Germany, formerly known as Prussia, containing the capital city of Berlin. Ancient. Associated with the Margravate (Dukedom) of Brandenburg, the seat of power in the Holy Roman Empire... [more]
BRANDIS German, Jewish, Swiss
German & Swiss: Habitational name from a former Brandis castle in Emmental near Bern, Switzerland, or from any of the places so named in Saxony, Germany. A famous bearer of the name is Jonathan Brandis (1976-2003).... [more]
BRANNER Danish, German, English
Danish variant of BRANDER and German variant of BRANTNER.
BRAS Dutch, Low German
Dutch and North German: from Old French and Middle Dutch bras ‘arm’. This was probably a descriptive nickname for someone with some peculiarity of the arm, but the word was also used as a measure of length, and may also have denoted a surveyor.
BRASE German
North German variation of Brass.
BRASS English, German
English (Northumberland): variant of Brace.... [more]
BRAUNDT German
Variant of Brandt.
BRAUNERSHRITHER German, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
BRECHT German
From a short form of any of various personal names formed with Germanic element berth " bright" "famous".
BREIDEGAM German
"bridegroom"
BREIT German
From Middle High German breit meaning "broad". a nickname for a stout or fat person.
BREITZMANN German
Derived from the name of a town called "Britz" in Germany + the suffix "mann" for man.
BREUNIG German, German (Austrian), American
Origin probably in Frankfurt am Main... [more]
BRICK Irish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of Broc’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
BRINCK German
Means "home on or near a hill".... [more]
BRINER German (Swiss)
Habitational name for someone from Brin in Grison canton (Graubünden) or from the Brin valley.
BRIZA German
Germanized form of Bříza.
BROCKER German
North German topographic name for someone who lived by a swamp, from Middle Low German brook bog + the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
BROCKMAN German
German in origin, in heraldry a "brock" is represented by a badger. It could mean wet/water and man. It also has been said to mean broker.
BROOK German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a water meadow or marsh, from Low German brook, Dutch broek (cf. BRUCH).... [more]
BROOK German, Jewish
Americanized spelling of German BRUCH and Jewish BRUCK.
BROTTMAN German
Dr Mikita Brottman
BRUCH German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a marsh or a stream that frequently flooded, from Middle High German bruoch "water meadow" or "marsh" (cognate to old English broc "brook", "stream" cf... [more]
BRÜCK German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge, or an occupational name for a bridge keeper or toll collector on a bridge, from Middle High German bruck(e) "bridge".
BRUCK German
Variant of BRÜCK.
BRUCKER German
Variant of BRÜCK.
BRUCKHEIMER German (Rare)
Bruckheimer is a German surname and is for someone who lived near a bridge.... [more]
BRUCKMAN German, English
German (Bruckmann): variant of Bruck, with the addition of the suffix -mann ‘man’. ... [more]
BRUCKNER German
Topographic name for someone living by a bridge or an occupational name for a bridge toll collector; a variant of Bruck with the addition of the suffix -ner.
BRUDER German
From a byname meaning "brother", occasionally used for a younger son, i.e. the brother of someone important, or for a guild member.
BRUECK German
Variant of BRÜCK.
BRUECKMAN Low German
it means "bridge man" or one who cares for a bridge
BRUECKNER German, German (Silesian)
German (Brückner): from Middle Low German brugge, Middle High German brugge, brücke, brügge ‘bridge’ + the agent suffix -ner, hence a topographic name for someone living by a bridge, an occupational name for a bridge toll collector, or in the southeast (Silesia for example) a bridge keeper or repairer... [more]
BRUEGGEMAN German
Variant of German Brueggemann.
BRUEGGEMANN Low German, German
North German (Brüggemann): topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper or street paver, Middle Low German brüggeman (see Bruckman, Brueckner).
BRUEGGER Low German
North German (Brügger): occupational name for a bridge keeper, paver, or road builder, Middle Low German brügger. Compare Brueggemann.
BRUEN German
This is my 2nd great uncle's wife's Surname of German ancestry.
BRUGGER German, American
South German variant or Americanized spelling of North German Brügger (see Bruegger). habitational name for someone from any of various (southern) places called Bruck or Brugg in Bavaria and Austria.
BRUNNER German (Austrian)
Brunner came from Tyrolean and Bavarian place names, or Brno.... [more]
BRUNSWICK English, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
BUCH German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a beech tree or beech wood, from Middle High German buoche, or a habitational name from any of the numerous places so named with this word, notably in Bavaria and Württemberg... [more]
BUCHE German
Meaning "beech" and denoting someone who lived near beech trees.
BUCHER German
Upper German surname denoting someone who lived by a beech tree or beech wood, derived from Middle High German buoche "beech tree".
BUCHWALDER German, German (Swiss)
Buchwalder is a German Surname.
BUELTER German, English
Middle European variant of Butler, also meaning "a vat or large trough used to contain wine." The name originated in southern Germany in the mid-seventeenth century.
BUERK German (Anglicized)
German from a short form of the personal name Burkhardt, a variant of Burkhart.
BUERMEISTER German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
BUNTING English, German
English: nickname from some fancied resemblance to the songbird... [more]
BUR Swiss, Low German, Czech, French
Swiss and North German variant of Bauer. ... [more]
BURDORF German
Means little farmer in german
BURGER English, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
BURGMEIER German
Occupational name for the tenant farmer of an estate belonging to a castle or fortified town, from Middle High German burc "(fortified) town, castle" and meier "tenant farmer" (see Meyer).
BURKHALTER German
Topographic name composed of the Middle High German elements burc "castle" "protection" and halter from halde "slope".
BURKHARDT German
Burk is German for "Strong", and hardt is the "heart of a castle".
BURMEISTER German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
BUSSE German, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
BUTTER English, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
BUTTGEREIT German
Variant spelling of Butgereit.
BÜTTNER German
Occupational name for a cooper or barrel-maker, an agent derivative of Middle High German büte(n) "cask", "wine barrel". This name occurs chiefly in eastern German-speaking regions.
BYERS German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Bayers.
CABELL Catalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
CARLIN German
Habitational name from a place named Carlin in Germany.
CARNER German, English
Americanized spelling of German Karner or Körner (see Koerner).... [more]
CHRIST German
From the Latin personal name Christus "Christ" (see Christian). The name Christ (Latin Christus) is from Greek Khristos, a derivative of khriein "to anoint", a calque of Hebrew mashiach "Messiah", which likewise means literally "the anointed".
CHRISTL German
Pet form of the given name Christian.
CHRYSLER German, Jewish
From a German name referring to spinning or related to a Yiddish word, krayzl meaning "spinning top." The name can refer to a potter who spun a wheel to make utensils or to a person with curly hair or someone known for being continually active... [more]
CLAASSEN German
The name Claassen means "son of Klaus." It's primarily German, but it's also Dutch and Danish.
CLINKENBEARD Low German
Possibly an Americanized form of North German Klingebiel, a variant of Klingbeil.
COARD German
Derived from the first name Konrad.
COERS German, Dutch
Derived from the given name Konrad
COLES English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
CONRAD German
Americanized spelling of KONRAD.