Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is Nifty_Name_Nerd.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ARLEN     American
Of uncertain origin. Possibly a form of the German name Erlen or a Gaelic name meaning "pledge" or "oath".
ARLINGTON     English
Location name that refers to a settlement associated with a personal name reduced to Arl- plus the Anglo-Saxon patronymic element -ing- then the element -ton denoting a "settlement"... [more]
ASBURY     English
English location name with the elements as- meaning "east" or "ash tree" and -bury meaning "fortified settlement."
BADDELEY     English
From place names in both Suffolk and Staffordshire derived from an Old English personal name, 'Badda,' possibly meaning "battle" and lee or leah for a "woodland clearing," therefore meaning someone from "Badda's woodland clearing."
BADLEY     English
Variant of Baddeley.
BEDFORD     English
From the English county Bedfordshire and its principal city or from a small community in Lancashire with the same name. The name comes from the Old English personal name Beda, a form of the name Bede and the location element -ford meaning "a crossing at a waterway." Therefore the name indicates a water crossing once associated with a bearer of the medieval name.
BENEDICT     English
Of Latin origin. Due to an early association as a saint's name and a papal name, often said to mean "blessed." Originally the Latin elements are 'bene-' meaning "good" or as an adverb "well" plus '-dict,' meaning "spoken." Thus, the literal meaning is "well spoken." ... [more]
BOOTS     English, Dutch, German
A variant of Boot meaning "shoemaker" in English or "boatman" in Dutch or German.
BURL     English
Old English occupational name originally meaning "cup bearer" or "butler" for one who dispensed wine and had charge of the cellar. Eventually the name came to mean the chief servant of a royal or noble household and was replaced by the French language inspired named 'Butler,' akin to the world "bottler".
BURLEY     English
English habitation name from the elements burh meaning "stronghold or fortified settlement" and leah meaning "field or clearing".
BYRON     English
An English place name, earlier Byram, from byre, meaning "farm" and the suffix -ham meaning "homestead". Famously borne by the aristocratic poet, Lord Byron.
BYRUM     English
Variant of Byron.
CABELL     Catalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
CHAUNCEY     American
Of uncertain origin. Possibly from Norman French habitation names Chancé or an American adaptation of a German place name of Schanze located on the Upper Rhine. Could also be a short form of Chancellor.
CHRYSLER     German, Jewish
From a German name referring to spinning or related to a Yiddish word, krayzl meaning "spinning top." The name can refer to a potter who spun a wheel to make utensils or to a person with curly hair or someone known for being continually active... [more]
CLEAVELAND     English
Spelling variant of Cleveland.
COLLEY     English
With variant Coley, can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas. Colley was used as a surname for generations of students from the same family taught by a teacher over many years in James Hilton's sentimental novel "Goodbye, Mr... [more]
COLLIS     English
A variant of Collins, itself a patronymic of given names Collin or Colin, both ultimately nicknames for Nicholas.
COLONEL     American
From a French word for a military rank of an officer who led a column of regimental soldiers. Could be a nickname for someone with a military bearing or demeanor.
COOTER     English
A Sussex, England surname of uncertain meaning. Could be a local pronunciation of Cotter, meaning "cottage dweller" for a serf in the feudal system allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
COTTER     English
"A cottage dweller", a name in the feudal system for a serf allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
DARDEN     English
A habitation name in Northumberland of uncertain origin.
DEFORD     French
Variant of Dufort meaning "son of the strong" from French de-, "of" and fort, "strong". Notable namesake is author Frank Deford.
DEWOLF     Dutch
A nickname for one identified with the animal or from a place noted for a sign showing a picture of a wolf. Signs with easily understood pictographs communicated the names of locations in preliterate Europe.
ELDEN     English
Variant of Eldon.
ELDON     English
Habitation name from the Old English personal name Ella- and -don from dun meaning "hill."
ELICH     German, American
Surname meaning "noble" from edelik or edelich. Notable bearer is professional ice hockey player Matt Elich.
EWELL     English
Habitation name from the town of Ewell in Surrey or from Temple Ewell or Ewell Manor, both in Kent or Ewell Minnis near Dover. Originally from Old English Aewill meaning "river source" or "spring".
EZELL     American
Of uncertain origin. The name is found primarily in the southeastern United States, possibly as a variation of Israel or a form of Ezekiel.
FELTON     English
A habitation name composed of the elements feld-, meaning "field or pasture" and -tun, meaning "settlement."
FIRMAN     English, French
From a medieval personal name meaning "firm, resolute, strong man." Borne by early saints and bishops. First name variants Firman and Firmin. Expressed in Latin as Firminus.
GORHAM     English
A name originating from Kent, England believed to come from the elements gara and ham meaning "from a triangular shaped homestead." Compare Gore.
GRADY     Irish
From the Gaelic Gráda meaning "noble."
HALLEY     English
Location name combining the elements hall as in "large house" and lee meaning "field or clearing."
HALLIE     English
Spelling variant of Halley.
HARWOOD     English, Scots
Habitation name found especially along the border areas of England and Scotland, from the Old English elements har meaning "gray" or hara referring to the animals called "hares" plus wudu for "wood"... [more]
HENCE     German, English, Welsh
An American spelling variant of Hentz derived from a German nickname for Hans or Heinrich or from an English habitation name found in Staffordshire or Shropshire and meaning "road or path" in Welsh.
HENTZ     German
From a nickname for Hans or Heinrich.
HOBART     English, Dutch
Variant of Hubert.
HOIT     English
A variant of Hoyt.
HOOT     Dutch, German
The Dutch form is a habitation name for someone who lived in the hout or "woods" while the German form hoth is from an occupational name for a maker of hats.
HOYT     English
Generally a topographical name for someone who lived on a hill or other high ground. As such Hoyt is related to words such as heights or high. Hoyt is also possibly a nickname for a tall, thin person where the original meaning is said to be "long stick".
ISHAM     English
The name of a village in Northamptonshire, England from the Celtic name of a local river Ise and the Anglo-Saxon term for a small settlement or homestead -ham.
ISOM     English
Variant of Isham.
KIX     English (Rare)
Location name from one of two rivers in West Yorkshire called Kex.
LAMB     English
A nickname for a gentle or malleable person or an occupational name for someone who raised or cared for young sheep. Can take the form Lum.
LONIE     Irish
A variant of Looney meaning "warrior."
LOONEY     Irish
From the Irish name O'Luanaigh, "descendant of Luanach," a personal name meaning warrior.
MANFORD     English
Place name for "Munda's ford" from an Old English personal name Munda, the same element in the second syllable of Edmund and ford meaning a waterway crossing.
MATHISON     English
Variant of Matheson.
OLIN     English, Dutch
English or Dutch name meaning either "from a low lying area" or from the word Hollander meaning "one from the Netherlands" a country well known for a low lying landscape.
ORBISON     English
From a village in Lincolnshire, England originally called Orby and later Orreby that is derived from a Scandinavian personal name Orri- and the Scandinavian place element -by which means "a farmstead or small settlement."
ORLEY     Dutch, Flemish, English
A surname of uncertain origin found among the Dutch, Flemish and English. In England the name is primarily found in Yorkshire and Devon. Orley may be an adapted form of a French name D'Orley or a nickname for Orlando... [more]
PARLEY     English
A place name meaning "pear field" from Old English 'per' with 'lee' or 'lea' meaning a field or clearing, perhaps where land was cleared to cultivate pear trees. Therefore this name denotes someone who lived near or worked at such a location or came from a habitation associated with the name... [more]
PARMLEY     English
Variant of Parley. This form is found more in northern England, specifically Cumberland and Durham, but is of like derivation.
PASTORELLI     Italian
An occupational name meaning "shepherd."
PERLEY     English
Variant of Parley or Burley.
PRESS     English, Jewish
A nickname for a pious individual from the Middle English form of "priest" or possibly someone employed by a priest. In the Jewish sense, one whose occupation was to iron clothes.
RALEIGH     English
English habitation name in Devon meaning "red woodland clearing".
RAWLEY     English
Variant of Raleigh.
REDDEN     English
Location name meaning "clearing or cleared woodland." Communities called Redden include one in Roxburghshire, Scotland and another in Somerset, England. A notable bearer is actor Billy Redden who played the dueling banjoist Lonnie in the 1972 film 'Deliverance.'
SLIM     English
A characteristic name for someone noted for being thin.
SMILEY     Scots, English
From elements small and lea meaning "a small clearing" or as a nickname may refer to a person of happy disposition known for smiling.
TWAIN     American
Most famously borne in the pen name of American author and one time Mississippi riverboat pilot Mark Twain (1835-1910), whose real name is Samuel Langhorne Clemens. The term twain is an Old English word for "two." The name Mark Twain is derived from a riverboat term meaning a mark of two fathoms depth on a line sunk in the river... [more]
VERNE     French, English
As a French surname refers to someone who lived where alder trees grew. While the English version can mean someone who lived where ferns grew, Verne can also mean a seller of ferns which in medieval times were used in bedding, as floor coverings and as animal feed.
WILBURN     English
A habitation name of uncertain origin found in the East Midlands. Speculation includes the possibility of the meaning "well" and "burn, borne" therefore meaning one who lived near a well or spring by a waterway crossing.
WOLK     German, American
Surname derived from a northern German short form of the given name Walter.
WOODSON     English
From a location in Yorkshire, England earlier spelled Woodsome and meaning "from the houses in the wood" or possibly a patronymic meaning "descendant of a wood cutter or forester."
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