Irish Submitted Surnames

Irish names are used on the island of Ireland as well as elsewhere in the Western World as a result of the Irish diaspora. See also about Irish names.
Filter Results     
more options...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AHEARNA     Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Either from an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Eachthighearna meaning "descendant of Eachthighearna", or else an anglicized form of Eachthighearna.
ANDERSON     Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Ghille Andrais meaning 'Son of the devotee of St. Andrew'. ... [more]
ANNA     English, Irish, Italian, Hungarian
Probably derived from the female first name ANNA.
ARDIES     Irish
Irish Isle Of Ards
BAINEBRIDGE     English, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
BARON     Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish surname Ó Bearáin (see Barnes).
BEOLLAN     English, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
English: variant of Boland.... [more]
BIDDLE     English, Irish
Variant of English BEADLE or German BITTEL. The name is now popular in the north east region of America, where it was brought by English and Irish immigrants.
BLACKERBY     English, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
BLANEY     Irish
Topographic name from Welsh blaenau, plural of blaen "point, tip, end", i.e. uplands, or remote region, or upper reaches of a river.
BODEN     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó BUADÁIN.
BOLLARD     English, Irish
According to MacLysaght, this surname of Dutch origin which was taken to Ireland early in the 18th century.
BONAR     Irish
A "translation" of Irish Gaelic Ó Cnáimhsighe "descendant of Cnáimhseach", a nickname meaning literally "midwife" and ostensibly a derivative of Gaelic cnámh "bone".
BOWDEN     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó BUADÁIN.
BRACKEN     Irish
From Irish Ó Breacáin meaning "descendant of Breacán", a personal name from a diminutive of breac 'speckled', 'spotted', which was borne by a 6th-century saint who lived at Ballyconnel, County Cavan, and was famous as a healer; St... [more]
BRAIN     Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized), Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mac an Bhreitheamhan ‘son of the judge’, from breitheamh ‘judge’.
BRANNAN     Irish
Variant of Brennan.
BRANNOCK     Irish
Originally taken from the Welsh place name Brecknock. Medieval settlers brought this name to Ireland.
BRAZIL     English (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
BREAN     Irish
Variant of Breen or Brain.
BRESLIN     Irish
Irish (Sligo and Donegal): Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breisláin ‘descendant of Breisleán’, a diminutive of the personal name Breasal (see Brazil).
BRICK     Irish
BRIDE     Irish, Scottish, English
Further Anglicized from Scottish/Irish MacBride, from the root for Brigid.
BRODERICK     Irish, Welsh, English
Surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a Welsh surname it is derived from ap Rhydderch meaning "son of Rhydderch". As an Irish surname it is an Anglicized form of Ó Bruadair meaning "descendent of Bruadar"... [more]
BROPHY     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bróithe ‘descendant of Bróth’, a personal name or byname of unknown origin. Also Anglicized as Broy.
BURK     English, Irish
Variant of BURKE
BYNES     Irish
This is the surname of American actress Amanda Bynes (born April 3, 1986).
CALKIN     Irish
Variant of Culkin.
CALVEY     Irish
Variation of McKelvey. Meaning rich in possessions or Irish from the French word bald
CAMMON     Scottish, Irish
Reduced form of McCammon.
CANNING     English, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname CANA and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
CANTWELL     Irish, English
A surname used in the South of England.... [more]
CARLIN     Irish (Anglicized), Scottish, French, Swedish, Italian, Jewish (Anglicized), German
Irish (now also common in Scotland) anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cairealláin, an Ulster family name, also sometimes Anglicized as Carlton, meaning ‘descendant of Caireallán’, a diminutive of the personal name Caireall... [more]
CARNAHAN     Irish
From the Irish Cearnaghan, meaning "victorious"
CARNEY     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Catharnaigh "descendant of Catharnach", a byname meaning "warlike".
CASSEY     Scottish, Irish
This surname originated around ancient Scotland and Ireland. In its Gaelic form it is called, 'O Cathasaigh', which means 'the watchful one'.... [more]
CAULFIELD     Irish
Comes from the Irish Gaelic Mac Cathmhaoil, which was Anglicized to McCawell and then morphed into Caulfield. Mac Cathmhaoil comes from a word meaning "chieftan".
CINNAMOND     Scottish, Irish, English
Possibly originates from Scottish place name Kininmonth. Probably introduced to Northern Ireland by Scottish settlers where it remains in Ulster. Another origin is the French place name Saint Amand originated from French Huguenots settling in Ireland.
CLANCY     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of MAC FHLANNCHAIDH.
CLAREY     Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Cléirigh and variant of O'Clery and Cleary.
CLARY     Irish
Variant of CLEARY
CLELAND     Belgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
COAKLEY     Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Caochlaoich "son of Caochlaoch", a personal name meaning literally "blind warrior".
COCHRAN     Scottish, Irish
Variant of COCHRANE.
COCHRANE     Scottish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish
Derived from the 'Lowlands of Cochrane' near Paisley, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. Origin is uncertain, the theory it may have derived from the Welsh coch meaning "red" is dismissed because of the historical spelling of the name Coueran.... [more]
CODEY     Irish
Based off of the given name Cody
COFFEE     Irish
Variant of Coffey.
COFFEY     Irish
Ireland County Cork
COILL     Irish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
COLES     English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
COMINS     Irish
Variant of CUMMINGS
CONDON     Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton. This seems to have been imported from Wales, but probably derives ultimately from Caunton in Nottinghamshire, which is named with the Old English personal name Caluno{dh} (composed of the elements calu "bald" + no{dh} "daring") + Old English tun "enclosure", "settlement".
CONE     Irish
Reduced form of McCone. Americanized spelling of North German Kohn or Köhn, or Kuhn.
CONLEY     Irish
Variant of Connolly. Also derived from the given name Conley.
CONLON     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
CONRAN     Irish
The surname Conran is derived from 'O Conarain', and Conran is a more anglicized version.... [more]
CONROY     Irish
meaning, "hound of prosperity"
CONWAY     Welsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
COOGAN     Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
COOGLAN     Irish
Irish surname of unknown meaning. May be a variant of Coghlan.
CORKERY     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corcra "descendant of Corcra", a personal name derived from corcair "purple" (ultimately cognate with Latin purpur).
CORR     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corra "descendant of CORRA".
COSGROVE     Irish
From the Gaelic name Ó Coscraigh "descendant of COSCRACH."
COSTELLO     Irish, Italian
Costello (Irish: Mac Coisdealbha) is a common Irish surname originating in County Mayo. The surname derives from Jocelyn de Angulo (fl.1172), an Anglo-Norman knight.... [more]
COVEY     Irish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
COY     Irish
Reduced form of McCoy.
COYLE     Irish
This last name means, "Dark Stranger."
CRAGG     Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of Craig, from Middle English Crag.
CRAVEN     Irish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Crabháin (County Galway) or Mac Crabháin (Louth, Monaghan) ‘descendant (or ‘son’) of Crabhán’... [more]
CRONIN     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Cróinín.
CROY     Irish (Anglicized)
A shortened form of the surname McRoy, from Irish Gaelic Mac Rúaidh "son of Rúadh", literally "the red one".
CULBERT     Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
CULVÉRT     French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
CUMMING     Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
CUMMINGS     Irish
Variant of CUMMING
CUNNIFF     Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Conduibh "son of Condubh", a personal name meaning literally "black dog".
CURRENT     Irish
The surname of Current, is of Irish/Scottish with several different families, and meanings of this name. There are many spelling variations of this name.
CURRIE     Scottish, Irish
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see Corrie).... [more]
CURRY     Irish, Scottish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Comhraidhe, ‘descendant of Comhraidhe’, a personal name of uncertain meaning.... [more]
DADE     Irish
Anglicized form of MacDaibheid, meaning "son of David".
DADY     Irish
Variant of Deady.
DAILY     Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Dálaigh, meaning "descendent of DÁLACH". The name has strong roots in the county Cork.
DALE     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic DALL.
DALL     Irish
Derived from Old Irish dall, a byname meaning "blind".
DARRAGH     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Dhubhdarach, a personal name meaning "black one of the oak tree".
DARRAH     Irish
Variant of DARRAGH.
DAVINE     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Duibhín meaning "descendant of Duibhín" (Duibhín meaning "little black one") or Ó Daimhín meaning "descendant of Daimhín" (Daimhín: "fawn").
DAW     Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deaghaidh, ‘descendant of Deaghadh’, a personal name of uncertain origin. It may be composed of the elements deagh- ‘good’ + ádh ‘luck’, ‘fate’; some such association seems to lie behind its Anglicization as Goodwin.
DAWLEY     Anglo-French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
DAYE     Irish, Scottish
Comes from Irish Ó Déa (m) or Ní Dhéa (f) ... [more]
DEA     Irish, Chinese
Irish: reduced form of O’Dea.... [more]
DEADY     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Déadaigh ‘descendant of Déadach’, a personal name apparently meaning ‘toothy’.
DEANE     Irish
Surname found in Ireland, it is the name of one of the Tribes of Galway.
DEES     Irish
The surname Dees refers to the grandson of Deaghadh (good luck); dweller near the Dee River; one with a dark or swarthy complexion. Also considered of Welsh origin.
DERRY     Irish
DEVILLY     Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
One of the anglicized versions of Ó Duibhghiolla, and Ancient Irish name meaning "Of the Black Attendant"
DEVITT     Irish
Comes from McDevitt, means "son of David."
DEVON     Irish
Variant of DEVIN.
DIAMOND     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Diamáin "descendant of Diamán", earlier Díomá or Déamán, a diminutive of Díoma, itself a pet form of DIARMAID.
DILLION     Irish, English
Possibly a variant of Dillon.
DILLON     Irish
Comes from the Irish origin
DIMOND     English, Irish
English and Irish variant of Diamond.
DISKIN     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Díscín "descendant of Díscín", which may be derived from díosc "barren". The place name Ballyeeskeen, now Ballydiscin, in County Sligo, is derived from the surname.
DOANE     Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Dubháin ‘descendant of Dubhán’, meaning ‘the little black one’, a common name in the 16th century in southern Ireland, or Ó Damháin ‘descendant of Damhán’ meaning ‘fawn’, ‘little stag’, a rare Ulster name... [more]
DONAHOE     Irish
Variant of DONOGHUE.
DONAHUE     Irish
Variant of DONOGHUE.
DONNELLAN     Irish
From the Gaelic Domhnallain, a diminutive of Donnell/Domhnall meaning "world mighty" (Irish form of the Scottish Donald).
DONOUGH     Irish
From the Gaelic Ó Donnchadha meaning "the descendent of DONNCHADH" (cf. DONOGHUE).
DOW     Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DOWDALL     Irish
Of English origin
DOWNEY     Irish
Anglicization of Irish name Dounaigh, which is, in turn, an Gaelicization of a Norman name. Dates from the 11th c.
DRURY     English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
DUBHAGÁINN     Irish
Derived from the given name Dubhagáin.
DUCK     English, Irish, Dutch, Low German, German
English from Middle English doke, hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept ducks or for a wild fowler. ... [more]
DUGAN     Irish (Anglicized)
Surname derived from Ó Dubhagáinn.
DUGGAN     Scottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
DULANEY     Irish
variant of Delaney
DUNNE     Irish, English, Scottish
This surname means dark and was likely given to those with a dark complexion or with dark hair.
DURKIN     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicised form of Mac Duarcáin meaning "son of Duarcán".
DWIGGINS     Irish
Anglicized form (with English genitive -s) of Gaelic Ó Dubhagáin (see Dugan) or, more likely, of Ó Duibhginn (see Deegan).Possibly a variant (by misdivision) of English Wiggins.
DWYER     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó DUBHUIDHIR.
EARLY     Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
EGAN     Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAodhagáin (see Hagan).
EMORY     English, Irish
English variant spelling of Emery.
ENNIS     Irish
From the Irish town of Ennis, which comes from Irish inis meaning "island".
ENRIGHT     Irish (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Indreachtach, literally "attacker". The surname was borne by British poet D.J. Enright (1920-2002).
EVERLY     Irish, English
Derived from the Irish Eibhear, which means "Irish".
FAGAN     Irish
From a surname, "The name Fagan in Ireland is usually of Norman origin, especially in Counties Dublin and Meath. In the County Louth area the name is derived from the native Gaelic O'Faodhagain Sept of which there are a number of variants including Feighan, Fegan and Feehan." (from irishsurnames.com)
FAHEY     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fathaidh or Ó Fathaigh ‘descendant of Fathadh’, a personal name derived from fothadh ‘base’, ‘foundation’. This name is sometimes Anglicized as Green(e as a result of erroneous association with faithche ‘lawn’.
FAHY     Irish
Variant of Fahey.
FAIR     English, Irish
English: nickname meaning ‘handsome’, ‘beautiful’, ‘fair’, from Middle English fair, fayr, Old English fæger. The word was also occasionally used as a personal name in Middle English, applied to both men and women.... [more]
FALLON     Irish
Anglicized form of the surname Ó Fallamhain meaning "descendant of Fallamhan", the name being a byname meaning "leader" (derived from follamhnas meaning "supremacy").
FANNING     Irish
The roots of the name are unclear. It seems the name is Native Irish Gaelic. It is thought to be derived from the Gaelic name Ó Fionnáin which means "fair".
FARADAY     Irish
From Irish Gaelic Ó Fearadaigh "descendant of Fearadach", a personal name probably based on fear "man", perhaps meaning literally "man of the wood". A famous bearer was British chemist and physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867).
FARLEY     Irish
anglicized form of the Gaelic surname O'Faircheallaigh.
FARMER     Irish
Anglicized (part translated) form of Gaelic Mac an Scolóige "son of the husbandman", a rare surname of northern and western Ireland.
FEE     Irish
Variant of O'FEE.
FEGAN     Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of Fagan.
FENNESSEY     Irish
An ancient Irish name. Presumed to come from the name Fionnghusa, or sometimes O'Fionnghusa.... [more]
FIELD     English, Scottish, Irish, Jewish (Anglicized)
English: topographic name for someone who lived on land which had been cleared of forest, but not brought into cultivation, from Old English feld ‘pasture’, ‘open country’, as opposed on the one hand to æcer ‘cultivated soil’, ‘enclosed land’ (see Acker) and on the other to weald ‘wooded land’, ‘forest’ (see Wald)... [more]
FINAN     Irish
Means "descendant of FIONNÁN", anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fionnáin.
FINNIGAN     Irish
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicization of the Gaelic O' Fionnagain, meaning the descendant(s) of Fionnagan, an Old Irish personal name derived from the word "fionn", white, fairheaded.
FITZWILLIAM     Irish
Fitz appears to be a Norman term derived from the French word fils and the Latin word filius, each of which means son. The name is most common in England and Ireland, each of which was conquered by Normans between 1066-1167.
FLANNERY     Irish
Appears originally in Irish Gaelic as O Flannabhra derived from flann, meaning "red", and abhra, meaning "eyebrow". First appeared in County Tipperary, Ireland.
FLOOD     Irish
There are some English Flood's, but the name mainly derives from the Irish O'Taicligh or Mac an Tuile and was Anglicized to Flood, Floyd, and Tully when the Gaelic language was outlawed in Ireland by the English.
FOGARTY     Irish (Anglicized)
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fógartaigh ‘son of Fógartach’, a personal name from fógartha meaning "proclaimed", "banished", "outlawed". It is sometimes Anglicized as Howard.
FOGERTY     Irish (Anglicized)
Variant spelling of Fogarty.
FOLEY     Irish
Irish surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a southern Irish surname it is derived from the Gaelic byname Foghlaidh meaning "pirate, marauder". As a northern Irish surname it is derived from the Gaelic personal name Searrach, which was based on searrach "foal, colt" and anglicized as Foley because of its phonetic similarity to English foal.
FOODY     Irish
Anglicized version of ó Fuada, or 'descendent of Fuada'. It comes from the personal name 'fuad' or 'swift' but also 'rush' and 'speed'.
FORBES     Irish, Scottish
Comes from a Scottish place meaning "field" in Gaelic. It can also be used as a first name.... [more]
FORDE     English, Irish, Norwegian
English and Irish: variant spelling of Ford. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.... [more]
FORSYTHE     Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic personal name Fearsithe, composed of the elements fear ‘man’ + sith ‘peace’. Some early forms with prepositions, as for example William de Fersith (Edinburgh 1365), seem to point to an alternative origin as a habitational name, but no place name of suitable form is known... [more]
FOY     Irish (Anglicized)
A different form of Fahy (from Irish Gaelic Ó Fathaigh "descendant of Fathach", a personal name probably based on Gaelic fothadh "foundation").
FOY     Irish
Variant of FEE.
FURLONG     English, Irish
Apparently a topographic name from Middle English furlong ‘length of a field’ (from Old English furh meaning "furro" + lang meaning "long".
GABEL     Irish
GALL     Scottish, Irish, English
Nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning "foreigner" or "stranger". In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century... [more]
GALVAN     Irish
Variant form of O'Galvin (see also Galvin).
GALVIN     Irish
Variant form of O'Galvin.
GAMON     Irish
This name is a last name for the Irish it means Liam Gamon.
GANNON     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mag Fhionnáin, a patronymic from the personal name Fionnán. This name, from a diminutive of fionn ‘white’, ‘fair’, was borne by several early Irish saints.
GARRIGHAN     Irish
to denote 'son of Geargain' a name which originally in derived from 'gearg' which meant grouse but which was often used figuratively for warrior
GAUL     Scottish (Latinized, Rare), Irish, German
Scottish and Irish: variant of Gall ... [more]
GEDDES     Scottish, Irish
There is a place of this name in Nairn, but the name is more likely to be a patronymic from Geddie.
GERRITY     Irish
the son of Oireachtach (member of an assembly).
GETTY     Irish
GHORMLEY     Irish
Variant of Gormley.
GILLESPIE     Scottish, Irish
Gillespie can be of Scottish and Irish origin. The literal meaning is "servant of bishop", but it is a forename rather than a status name. The Irish Gillespies, originally MacGiollaEaspuig, are said to to be called after one Easpog Eoghan, or Bishop Owen, of Ardstraw, County Tyrone... [more]
GILPATRICK     Irish
Variant of Kilpatrick
GLASS     Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of the epithet glas "gray, green, blue" or any of various Gaelic surnames derived from it.
GLISSEN     English, Irish
Possible British version of the Irish surname Glasson from the the Gaelic word O’Glasain. Meaning green from the counties of Tipperary.
GORMLEY     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicised form of Ó Gormghaile meaning "descendant of Gormghal," Gormghal, a personal name, being derived from gorm meaning "noble, (dark) blue" and gal meaning "valour, ardour."
GORRY     Irish, Scottish
Variant of MCGORRY.
GOUGH     Irish
Reduced form of McGough.
GOWAN     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Gobhann ‘descendant of the smith’.
GRAYDEN     Irish
Variation of Graden.
GRAYSON     Scottish, Irish
Means "son of Gray".
GRIFFIN     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized (part translated) form of Gaelic Ó Gríobhtha "descendant of Gríobhtha", a personal name from gríobh "gryphon".
GRIMES     English, Irish
The surname Grimes means 'son of Grimme'. It is also an anglicized version of the Irish surnames 'O Gormghaile', and 'O Goirmleadhaigh' from Ulster.... [more]
GURRY     Irish
Variant of GORRY.
GUTHRIE     Scottish, Irish, German
Scottish: habitational name from a place near Forfar, named in Gaelic with gaothair ‘windy place’ (a derivative of gaoth ‘wind’) + the locative suffix -ach. Possibly an Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mag Uchtre ‘son of Uchtre’, a personal name of uncertain origin, perhaps akin to uchtlach ‘child’.... [more]
HADDEN     Irish
Variation of Haden
HAGAN     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÁgáin "descendant of Ógán", a personal name from a diminutive of óg "young".
HAGAN     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAodhagáin "descendant of Aodhagán", a personal name formed from a double diminutive of Aodh meaning "fire".
HALLINAN     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÁilgheanáin "descendant of Áilgheanán", a pet form of a personal name composed of old Celtic elements meaning "mild, noble person".
HAMILL     Irish
According to MacLysaght, a shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÁdhmaill "descendant of Ádhmall", which he derives from ádhmall "active".
HANAFIN     Irish
Shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAinbhthín (modernized as Ó hAinifín) ‘descendant of Ainbhthín’, a personal name derived from ainbhíoth ‘non-peace’, ‘storm’.
HANLON     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAnluain "descendant of Anluan", a personal name from the intensive prefix an- and luan "light", "radiance" or "warrior". Occasionally it has been used to represent HALLINAN.
HARE     Irish (Anglicized)
Irish (Ulster): Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÍr, meaning ‘long-lasting’. In Ireland this name is found in County Armagh; it has also long been established in Scotland.... [more]
HAROLD     Irish
Of direct Norse origin, but is also occasionally a variant of Harrell and Hurrell.
HAY     English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HEALY     Irish
Southern Irish: reduced form of O’Healy, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÉilidhe ‘descendant of the claimant’, from éilidhe ‘claimant’, or of Gaelic Ó hÉalaighthe ‘descendant of Éaladhach’, a personal name probably from ealadhach ‘ingenious’.
HENLEY     English, Irish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, are named with Old English héan (the weak dative case of heah ‘high’, originally used after a preposition and article) + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’... [more]
HENNESSEE     Irish
A variant of the traditionally Irish surname Hennessey or Hennessy, an Anglicization of Ó hAonghusa meaning "‘descendant of Aonghus".
HENNESSEY     Irish
Variant spelling of Hennessy.
HENNESSY     Irish
Reduced form of O’Hennessy, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hAonghusa ‘descendant of Aonghus’ (see Angus, and compare McGinnis).
HERLIHY     Irish
From Irish Gaelic Ó hIarfhlatha "descendant of Iarfhlaith", a personal name meaning literally "lord of the west".
HEWTON     Irish
I can only date it back to Armagh County, Ireland in the early 1800s.
HIGGINS     Irish, English
Irish: variant of Hagan.... [more]
HIGGINS     Irish
Variant of Hagan.
HINDMAN     Irish
Keeper of the king's deer.
HOLLAND     Irish (Anglicized), Irish, English, Scottish, German, Danish, Jewish, Dutch
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÓileáin, a variant of Ó hAoláin, from a form of FAOLÁN (with loss of the initial F-).... [more]
HOOD     English, Scottish, Irish
English and Scottish: metonymic occupational name for a maker of hoods or a nickname for someone who wore a distinctive hood, from Middle English hod(de), hood, hud ‘hood’. Some early examples with prepositions seem to be topographic names, referring to a place where there was a hood-shaped hill or a natural shelter or overhang, providing protection from the elements... [more]
HORAN     Irish
The last name Horan means warlike.It is the last name of one direction member Niall Horan
HOUGAN     Irish
Variant of HOGAN.
HURRELL     Irish
This may be an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hEarghaill ‘descendant of Earghall’, a variant of Ó Fearghail (see Farrell).
HUSSEY     English, Irish
As an English surname, it comes from two distinct sources. It is either of Norman origin, derived from Houssaye, the name of an area in Seine-Maritime which ultimately derives from Old French hous "holly"; or it is from a Middle English nickname given to a woman who was the mistress of a household, from an alteration of husewif "housewife"... [more]
HYRES     Irish
KANE     Irish, Norwegian
From the anglicized Irish surname Cathan, meaning "warlike." In Norway, it's used as a noble name.
KEARNS     Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Céirín ‘descendant of Céirín’, a personal name from a diminutive of ciar ‘dark’, ‘black’. English patronymic -s has been added superfluously.
KEARNY     Irish
Variant of Kearney.
KEARSE     Irish
Variant of KEIRSEY.
KEEL     English (Anglicized), English, Irish, German (Swiss), German (Anglicized)
English habitational name from Keele in Staffordshire, named from Old English cy ‘cows’ + hyll ‘hill’, or from East and West Keal in Lincolnshire, which are named from Old Norse kjolr ‘ridge’... [more]
KEEL     Irish
Irish reduced form of McKeel.
KEENAN     Irish
Derived from the given name Keenan meaing "anceint".
KEIRSEY     Irish
Topographic name of Norman origin name dating back to the 13th century.
KELLEHER     Irish
From Gaelic Ó Céileachair meaning "son of Céileachar". The Irish given name Céileachar means "companion-dear", i.e., "lover of company".
KENNEALLY     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cionnfhaolaidh ‘descendant of Cionnfhaoladh’, a personal name derived from ceann ‘head’ + faol ‘wolf’.
KENNELLY     Irish
Variant spelling of Kenneally.
KENNY     English, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coinnigh "descendant of Coinneach" or Ó Cionaodha "descendant of Cionaodh".
KERIN     Irish (Latinized, Rare)
Irish variation of Kieran. ... [more]
KIDNEY     Irish
Surname translated from Irish surname DUANE to English KIDNEY Mainly found in County Cork. Original Irish clan name is Ó DUBHÁIN.
KIERAN     Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ciaráin ‘descendant of Ciarán’, a byname from a diminutive of ciar ‘dark’, ‘black-haired’. It was borne by two Irish saints, a hermit of the 5th century and the founder of the monastery at Clonmacnoise.
KILBRIDE     Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Bhrighde "son of the devotee of Saint Brigid" (cf. MACBRIDE). Many of Saint Brigid's attributes became attached to the historical figure of St. Brigit of Kildare, Ireland, thus the spelling.
KILCOMMON     Irish
Indicated a person who was from Kilcommon, Erris, County Mayo in Ireland. The place name Kilcommon derives from the Gaeltacht phrase Cill Chomáin, meaning "church of St. Comán."
KILCOMMONS     Irish
Variant of KILCOMMON
KILLEEN     Irish
From the Gaelic name Ó Cillín meaning "descendant of Cillín".
KILLIAN     Irish (Anglicized, Modern), German
Meaning "little church". From cill (Irish for "church") and -ín, a Gaelic diminutive.
KILPATRICK     Irish, Scottish
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Phádraig "son of the servant of (Saint) Patrick"... [more]
KINSELLA     Irish
From Gaelic Uí Ceinnsealaigh meaning "descendant of Cinnsealach", a given name probably meaning "chief warrior".
KIRWAN     Irish
From Gaelic Ó Ciardhubháin meaning "descendant of Ciardhubhán", a given name composed of the elements ciar "dark" and dubh "black" combined with a diminutive suffix.
KNOWLES     English, Irish
As an English surname it is derived from a genitive or plural form of Middle English knolle meaning "hilltop, hillock", denoting a person who either lived at the top of a hill or near a hillock, or hailed from one of the many places in England named with this word.... [more]
KYNE     Irish
From Gaelic Ó Cadháin meaning "descendant of Cadhán", a byname meaning "barnacle goose".
LACKEY     Irish
Lackey was originally a name for a horse servant.
LAHEY     Irish
Lahey and Leahy originate from two different Gaelic surnames. Lahey, Lahy, Lahiff, Lahiffe, Laffey, and Lahive all originate from the Gaelic surname O Laithimh, which itself is a variant of O Flaithimh... [more]
LANEY     English, Irish
Possibly from the given name Laney or the Irish surname McElhinney.
LAVELLE     Irish
Anglicized form Gaelic Ó Maol Fábhail meaning "descendent of MAOLFÁBHAIL".
LAWLER     Irish, Scottish
This Irish surname is of Gaelic language origin. The surname derives from the original Gaelic 'O'Leathlobhair' meaning 'descendant of leathlobhair'. Leathlobhair derives from 'Leath' meaning 'Half' and 'Lobhar' meaning 'leper'.... [more]
LEANNE     English, Irish
means "gracious plum" in english
LECKEY     Scottish, English, Irish
Originally Scottish, but also found in England, Northern Ireland and Ireland. Possibly derives from the barony of Leckie (meaning "place of flagstones", from Gaelic leac, "flagstone") in Stirlingshire.
LEHAN     Irish
LEHANE     Irish
Lehane (Irish: Ó Liatháin) is an uncommon Irish surname, typically from County Cork. Ó Liatháin is more frequently anglicized as Lane or Lyons. The surname is also found in County Donegal where it was also anglicized from the Ulster branch of O'Liathain into Lehane, Lane, Lyons,and Lawn.
LEHIGH     German, Irish
Derived from a Native American word "Lechauwekink", meaning "where there are forks in the stream". Variant of Lechau .
LEYDON     Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
His name was commemorated in numerous place-names, such as Lugdunum (Celtic *Lugudūnon, "fort of Lugus"; modern Lyon, France), capital of the Roman province of Gallia Lugdunensis. Other such place-names include Lugdunum Clavatum (modern Laon, France) and Luguvalium21 (modern Carlisle, England)... [more]
LICET     Irish
Anglicized from MAC GIOLLA IASACHTA.
LILLIS     Irish, English
Metronymic from Lilly.
LINN     Scottish, Scots, English, Irish, German, Jewish, Finnish (Anglicized), Estonian
As a Scottish and Northern English surname, it is a variant of Lyne. Its usage as an English name is primarily by Scots living in Northern England.... [more]
LINNANE     Irish, English
Anglicized form of O'Lennon.
LIVINGSTONE     Scottish, Irish, Jewish
Scottish: Habitational name from a place in Lothian, originally named in Middle English as Levingston, from an owner called Levin (Lewin), who appears in charters of David I in the early 12th century.... [more]
LOFLIN     Irish
Possibly a variant spelling of Irish Laughlin. This is a common name in NC.
LOHAN     Irish
LOMASNEY     Irish
From Gaelic Ó Lomasna meaning "descendant of Lomasna", a byname from lom "bare" and asna "rib".
LOUGHREY     Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Luachra "descendant of Luachra", a personal name derived from luachair "light". The name is often translated, Rush from a Gaelic homonym, luachair meaning "rush".
LOWERY     English, Irish
Irish variant of Lowry
LYCETT     Irish
Anglicized from MAC GIOLLA IASACHTA.
LYCETTE     Irish
Anglicized from MAC GIOLLA IASACHTA.
LYNESS     Northern Irish, Irish, English
Variant of LINES or anglicized form of Mac Aleenan.
LYSAGHT     Irish
Anglicized from MAC GIOLLA IASACHTA.
LYSAIGHT     Irish
Anglicized from MAC GIOLLA IASACHTA.
LYSAUGHT     Irish
Anglicized from MAC GIOLLA IASACHTA.
LYSETT     Irish
Anglicized from MAC GIOLLA IASACHTA.
MAC AN AIRCHINNIGH     Irish
It literally means "son of the hereditary steward of church lands".
MAC AN FHILIDH     Irish
Meaning, "son of the poet."
MAC CANANN     Irish
Means "son of CANÁN". Canán is a given name derived from the word cano "wolf cub".
MAC CATHMHAOIL     Irish
It literally means Cathmhaol’s son".
MAC CEARBHAILL     Irish
Meaning, "son of Cearbhaill."
MAC COINGHEALLAIGH     Irish
Meaning, ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach’, a personal name meaning ‘faithful to pledges’.
MAC CONGHAILE     Irish
Meaning, "son of Conghal."
MAC CON MHAOIL     Irish
Means "Son of the short haired warrior''.
1  2  3      Next Page         649 results (this is page 1 of 3)