Dutch Submitted Surnames

Dutch names are used in the Netherlands and Flanders. See also about Dutch names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABRESCH     German, Dutch, Jewish
From a pet form of the Biblical name Abraham.
AIKMAN     Dutch, English, Scottish
Originally a surname or a nickname meaning oak man.
ALNEMY     Flemish
Only know relation claims birth in East Flanders. Arabic speakers believe it may be of Syrian or Saudi Arabian origin.
APPEL     German, Dutch, Jewish, Low German, Medieval Dutch, Yiddish
1. German: from the personal name Appel, a pet form of Apprecht (common especially in Thuringia and Franconia), itself a variant of Albrecht. ... [more]
ATEN     Frisian, Dutch
The Frisian name Aten means "Noble Wolf". The name was probably given to lesser lords. As noble would mean nobility. As wolf was always a symbol of a warrior, or hunter. Usually Nobles who were also warriors, were lesser lords... [more]
AUKERMAN     Dutch
Americanized form of Dutch Ackerman. This was a frequent name in New Netherland in the 17th century.
AVEN     Scandinavian, English, German, Dutch, French (Anglicized)
Scandinavian: unexplained.... [more]
AX     Dutch
originally French, used to be de Ax, meaning "from Ax", several possible places called Ax or Aix or variants.
BAACK     North Frisian, Dutch
Either from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name Baldeke (a short form of any of the compound names with the first element bald ‘bold’, for example Baldewin) or from Middle Low German baec, bake ‘pork’, ‘bacon’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a butcher or pig farmer.
BARZELAIJ     Dutch, Jewish
Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Barzilai via Barzelay. Also compare Barzilaij. This name is found exclusively in the Dutch-Jewish community, and is considered quite rare: there were only 6 bearers in 1947 and less than 5 bearers in 2007.
BARZILAIJ     Dutch, Jewish
Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Barzilai via Barzilay. This name is found exclusively in the Dutch-Jewish community, and is considered quite rare: there were only 112 bearers in 1947 and only 51 bearers in 2007.
BAUMFREE     Dutch, American, African American
This name is clearly derived from Sojourner Truth, a former African-American slave who was born as Isabella Bomefree (but at some point the surname was changed to the more German-looking Baumfree). Although Sojourner's original owners - James and Elizabeth Bomefree/Baumfree - were apparently of Dutch descent, it is questionable whether the surname is really of Dutch origin... [more]
BAY     English, French, Dutch, Scottish, German, Danish, Norwegian
English, French, and Dutch: nickname for someone with chestnut or auburn hair, from Middle English, Old French bay, bai, Middle Dutch bay ‘reddish brown’ (Latin badius, used originally of horses).... [more]
BEER     English, German, Dutch, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of the forty or so places in southwestern England called Beer(e) or Bear(e). Most of these derive their names from the West Saxon dative case, beara, of Old English bearu ‘grove’, ‘wood’ (the standard Old English dative bearwe being preserved in Barrow)... [more]
BEHR     German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of the personal name Bähr (see Baer).
BENS     Dutch, German
Patronymic from a short form of Bernhard.
BERGSMA     Dutch
The surname Bergsma had orinally been German. It was then taken over to Holland possibly in the sixteenth century.... [more]
BLANK     Dutch
Dutch and German nickname for a man with white or fair hair or a pale complexion, from Middle Low, Middle High German blanc "bright", "shining", "white", "beautiful", Middle Dutch blank "fair", "white".... [more]
BLANKENBILLER     Dutch
Habitational name from a place called Blankenbijl or similar.
BLASIUS     German, Dutch, Scandinavian
From the Latin personal name Blasius. This was a Roman family name, originating as a byname for someone with some defect, either of speech or gait, from Latin blaesus "stammering" (compare Greek blaisos "bow-legged")... [more]
BLAZE     Dutch
BLAZER     Dutch
from Middle Dutch blaser ‘blower’, hence an occupational name for a player of the trumpet or other wind instrument, or a nickname for a braggart or boaster
BLEECKER     Dutch
Occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, a launderer, or the owner of a public bleaching ground.
BLEEKER     Dutch
Occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, from Middle Dutch ble(e)kere.
BLEIBERG     Dutch
Habitational name from a place so named in Luxembourg province, Belgium.
BLOEM     Dutch
Means "flower" in Dutch.
BLONDER     Dutch
Occupational name for a brewer.
BLOOM     Jewish (American), Dutch
Americanized spelling of Bloem and Blum.
BOEHM     German, Dutch, Jewish
Ethnic name for a native or inhabitant of Bohemia (now the western part of the Czech Republic), from Böhmen, German name of Bohemia (Middle High German Böheim, Beheim). This derives its name from the tribal name Baii + heim "homeland"; the Baii were a tribe, probably Celtic, who inhabited the region in the 1st century A.D. and were gradually displaced by Slavic settlers in the period up to the 5th century... [more]
BOEN     Dutch
Occupational name for a bean grower, from Middle Dutch bone, boene "bean".
BOJE     Dutch
Variant spelling of Boye.
BONUS     French, German, Dutch
Humanistic Latinization of vernacular names meaning ‘good’, for example French Lebon or Dutch de Goede
BOODA     Dutch
BOOMHOUWER     German, Dutch
Boomhouwer, means "Cutter of Trees", or "The one who hews trees", having Boom translating into "tree", houw meaning to "hew" or to "cut", and er meaning "the one who".... [more]
BOONE     Dutch
Variant of BOEN.
BOOT     English, Dutch, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of boots, from Middle English, Old French bote (of unknown origin).... [more]
BOOTZ     Dutch
A Dutch surname meaning a "nickname for a ridiculous person" or a variant of Boot
BOREMAN     Dutch
Dutch: variant of Borneman. ... [more]
BORMAN     Dutch, Low German, English
Dutch and North German: variant of Bormann. ... [more]
BORNE     English, French, Dutch
1. English: variant spelling of Bourne. ... [more]
BORNEMAN     Dutch
1. Respelling of German Bornemann. ... [more]
BOS     Dutch
"Forest, Woods"... [more]
BOTTING     English, Dutch
Patronymic from BOTT, an Old English personal name of unknown origin.
BOWDLER     Flemish, English
Originally de Boelare it evolved to Bowdler or Bowdle after Baldwin de Boelare came to England in 1105 & was given a lordship over Montgomery, Wales.
BOYE     English, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From a Germanic personal name, Boio or Bogo, of uncertain origin. It may represent a variant of Bothe, with the regular Low German loss of the dental between vowels, but a cognate name appears to have existed in Old English, where this feature does not occur... [more]
BRAS     Dutch, Low German
Dutch and North German: from Old French and Middle Dutch bras ‘arm’. This was probably a descriptive nickname for someone with some peculiarity of the arm, but the word was also used as a measure of length, and may also have denoted a surveyor.
BRAUNERSHRITHER     German, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
BRIGGS     English, Flemish
This surname is a variant of the more common name Bridges, which, contrary to appearances, has two possible origins, one the perhaps obvious English topographical or occupational one, and the other locational, from Belgium... [more]
BROOK     German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a water meadow or marsh, from Low German brook, Dutch broek (cf. BRUCH).... [more]
BROUWER     Dutch
Dutch occupational name for a brewer of beer or ale, Middle Dutch brouwer.
BROUWERS     Dutch
Possibly means "brewer; brewers" relating to one who brews beer.
BRUGMAN     Dutch, Swiss
Dutch: topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper, from Dutch brugge ‘bridge’ (see Bridge); in some cases, it is a habitational name for someone from the Flemish city of Bruges (or Brugge), meaning ‘bridges’... [more]
BURGER     English, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
CHOATE     English, Dutch
The names of Choate and Chute are believed to have been of common origin and derived from the residence of their first bearers at a place called Chute in Wiltshire, England. Certain historians, however, state that the name of Choate was of Dutch origin and was taken by its first bearers from their residence at a place of that name in the Netherlands.
CLUTE     Dutch
From kluit, meaning "lamp"
COERS     German, Dutch
Derived from the given name Konrad
CONKLIN     Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
COONROD     Dutch
Americanized spelling of Dutch Coenraet or Koenraadt or German Kühnrat (Konrad).
CRABB     English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
CRANE     English, Dutch
1. English: nickname, most likely for a tall, thin man with long legs, from Middle English cran ‘crane’ (the bird), Old English cran, cron. The term included the heron until the introduction of a separate word for the latter in the 14th century... [more]
CRAUWELS     Flemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
CRUZAN     Dutch
Americanized spelling of CRUYSSEN.
DAANE     Dutch
From a pet form of the personal name Daniel.
DALEIDEN     German, Dutch (Rare)
Habitational name from a place in the Rhineland called Daleiden.
DE BOER     Dutch
Variant of BOER.
DE BONTE     Dutch
Bont is a word to describe something with many colours, originally used for spotted cows. So the name means: The one with many colours. Figuratively speaking this would mean: The one who acts crazy.
DE GEER     Dutch, Swedish
The name is possibly derived from the town of Geer near Liège, Belgium. The town lies along the course of the river Jeker, which is called Geer in French.
DE KOK     Dutch
Literally means "the cook" in Dutch.
DE LEEUW VAN WEENEN     Dutch
Means "Lion of Vienna" in Dutch.
DEREMER     Dutch
From an old personal name Terrimar, which is probably from Old High German dart ‘spear’ + mari ‘famous’
DE ROZEN     Dutch
A Dutch surname meaning "the roses".
DE SMET     Dutch
De Smet or Desmet is a Dutch occupational surname. It is a regional form of "the smith" very common in East and West Flanders.1 2 It was the tenth most common name in Belgium in 1997
DE ZEEUW     Dutch
Nickname for someone from the Dutch provence Zeeland
DISTEL     German, North German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of ground overgrown with thistles, or perhaps a nickname for a "prickly" person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch distel "thistle".
DORN     German, German (Austrian), Dutch, Flemish, English
Means "thorn" in German.
DOW     Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DUCK     English, Irish, Dutch, Low German, German
English from Middle English doke, hence a nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a duck or a metonymic occupational name for someone who kept ducks or for a wild fowler. ... [more]
DUCK     Dutch
Dutch variant of Duyck. In a German-speaking environment, this is also a variant of van Dyck and Dyck.
DUISTERWALD     Dutch (Archaic)
'Dutchization' of Düsterwald.
DUISTERWOUD     Dutch
Dutch equivalent of Düsterwald.
DUYCK     Dutch
Dutch nickname from Middle Dutch duuc ‘duck’; in some cases the name may be a derivative of Middle Dutch duken ‘to dive’ and cognate with Ducker. Compare also Duck
DYCK     Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dike, Dutch dijk. Compare Dyke.
DYKEMA     Dutch
Derived from DYK, a Dutch form of DYKE.
ELENBAAS     Dutch
Reinterpretation of Elenbos or Elebaers, from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements alja ‘other’ or agil ‘point or edge (of a sword)’ + berht ‘bright’.
ENGEN     Norwegian, Dutch
Norwegian habitational name. Singular definite form of ENG.... [more]
ERASMUS     French, Dutch
it means beloved one or king
ESCHER     Dutch, German
German habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Esch, Esche, or Eschen.
FENDRICH     Dutch
The surname Fendrich has its origin in Austria, and mean "flag-bearer".
FLEMISTER     Flemish
Name of a man from Flanders, the same as the surname Fleming.
FLORIS     Dutch
"Personal name"... [more]
FREELING     English, Dutch
This is the surname of Christian Freeling (born February 1, 1947 in Enschede, Netherlands)a Dutch game designer and inventor. This surname was also used for the main character "Carol Anne Freeling" in the Poltergeist film of 1982 as well.... [more]
GEERS     Dutch
Patronymic from a short form of any of various personal names formed with the Germanic element gar,ger.
GEERTS     Dutch
Variant of the surname Geers.
GIESBRECHT     Dutch
A variant of the given name GISELBERT, which in turn is related to GILBERT. Possibly used in reference to Gjisbrecht IV van Amstel, a 13th century Dutch noble. It means "bright heir", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "heir, hostage" and beraht "bright".
GILLIS     Dutch
Dutch form of Giles.
GOUWELEEUW     Dutch (Rare, Archaic)
Surname from the Netherlands meaning 'Golden Lion'
GRAAF     Dutch
proper noun: Count
GRAEF     Dutch, German
Name used to denote the chairman of a town council. Compare Graf.
GRAF     German, Dutch
Variant spelling of Dutch Graef.
GROOT     Dutch
Groot means "big" in Dutch and the surname was originally a nickname for a tall person.
HAAN     Dutch
It means "rooster" in Dutch
HAGEMAN     Dutch, Swedish
Dutch: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, from Middle Dutch haghe ‘hedge’, ‘enclosure’ + man ‘man’. Respelling of German Hagemann. ... [more]
HALLÉN     Swedish, Dutch
Swedish variant of Hall, with the addition of the adjectival suffix -én. Possibly a shortened form of Dutch van der Hallen, a topographic or habitational name from Middle Dutch halle ‘hall.’
HAMEL     Yiddish, Dutch, German
The name Hamel has three origins.... [more]
HARMSE     Dutch, Low German
The surname Harmse is derived from Harms or Harm, a Low-German / Niederdeutsch surname or name. In Plattdeutsch/Low Saxon the word sine is used as a possessive construction, hence Harmse indicates that it is the child of Harms, Harm, or Harmensze... [more]
HARMSE     Dutch
NORTH-HOLLAND
HARTMAN     Dutch
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hard "hardy, strong" and man "man".
HAVERBUS     Yiddish, Dutch
From Yiddish/Hebrew Haver (חבר) and Baruch (ברוך), thus literally "blessed friend".
HAY     English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HAZARD     English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
HEBERT     Dutch
From the personal name Egbert.
HECHT     German, Dutch
From Middle High German hech(e)t, Middle Dutch heect, hecht "pike", generally a nickname for a rapacious and greedy person. In some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a fisher and in others it may be a habitational name from a house distinguished by a sign depicting this fish.
HEGEMAN     Dutch
Habitational name for someone from a place called Hegge(n) or ter Hegge(n), derived from a word meaning ‘hedge’.
HEIN     German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
HELMEYER     German, Dutch, Danish
From Hel in Norse mythology and Meyer meaning "higher, superior". It means ´blessed´ or ´holy´. The name is mostly found in Germany, but also in the Netherlands and some parts of Denmark.
HENDRICKS     Dutch, English
Variant of HENDRIKS
HENNEN     German, Dutch
Patronymic of Henne.
HERD     Dutch
Comes from Middle Dutch hert, herte ‘hart’, ‘stag’; probably a nickname for someone who was fleet of foot, or a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a deer; variant of Heard.
HEYER     English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
HICK     Dutch
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name, such as Icco or Hikke (a Frisian derivative of a compound name with the first element hild "strife", "battle").
HIERONYMUS     Dutch, German
From the Greek given name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name". (See JEROME.)
HILBERT     English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
HINKEBEIN     Dutch, German
Nickname for someone with a limp, from Middle Low German hinken meaning "to limp" + bein meaning "leg".
HOF     Dutch
HOLL     German, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
HOLLAND     Irish (Anglicized), Irish, English, Scottish, German, Danish, Jewish, Dutch
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÓileáin, a variant of Ó hAoláin, from a form of FAOLÁN (with loss of the initial F-).... [more]
HOLLANDER     German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
HOOFT     Dutch
HOOGENBOOM     Dutch
Topographic name for someone living by a tall tree, "tall tree", or a habitational name from places called Hoogboom and Hogenboom in the Belgian province of Antwerp, meaning "tall tree".
HOPPE     Dutch
Variant of Hopp.
HOSEKIN     Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or seller of hose (garments for the legs), from Middle Low German hose "hose".
HOSKINS     Dutch
Variant of HOSEKIN.
HUBERT     German, Dutch, English, French, Jewish
From a Germanic given name composed of the elements hug "heart", "mind", "spirit" and berht "bright", "famous".
HUCK     English, Dutch
From the medieval male personal name Hucke, which was probably descended from the Old English personal name Ucca or Hucca, perhaps a shortened form of Ūhtrǣd, literally "dawn-power".
HUMBERT     German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hun "Hun, giant" or hun "bear cub" and berht "bright, famous". This was particularly popular in the Netherlands and North Germany during the Middle Ages as a result of the fame of a 7th-century St... [more]
JACOBI     Jewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
JANMAAT     Dutch
Famous bearer of this surname is Dutch footballer Daryl Janmaat.
JAPENGA     Dutch
Means son of Jap " Yap" related to Jacobson in the Netherlands
JESTEN     Dutch
Variation of Joosten.
JOSEPH     Hebrew, English, Dutch, Yiddish
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament, Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died... [more]
JOST     Dutch, German
Dutch and German: from a personal name, a derivative of the Breton personal name Iodoc (see Joyce), or from the personal name Just.
KANSSEN     Dutch, Flemish
Son of Kant
KARMAN     English, Dutch
Variant of Carman (1)
KEMPER     German, Dutch
German: status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp ... [more]
KENTIE     Scottish, English, Dutch
Origin and meaning unknown. The name Kentie was spread in the Netherlands when a Scottish soldier, Alexander Kenti, settled at Woudrichem, the Netherlands around 1650. Alexander Kenti was born and raised in the Scottish highlands... [more]
KESSEL     Dutch, Belgian
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named "Kessel" in the Belgian provinces of Antwerp and Limburg or North Brabant in The Netherlands.
KESSLER     German, Dutch, Jewish
Occupational surname denoting a coppersmith or maker of copper cooking vessels; derived from Middle High German kezzel "kettle, cauldron" and/or Middle Dutch ketel.
KIEL     Dutch
Dutch from Middle Dutch kidel, kedel ‘smock’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who make such garments or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore one. Also a dutch habitational name from a place so named in Antwerp or from the German city Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein.
KIN     Dutch
Nickname for someone with a pointed or jutting chin.
KIND     English, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
KINNE     German, Dutch
German: From the female given name Kinne, a Silesian diminutive of Kunigunde.... [more]
KLERCKX     Dutch
Variant of De klerk
KLEYNEN     Flemish
Comes from the town in Belgium. Originally Van Klijnen
KNICKERBOCKER     Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of the Dutch occupational name Knickerbacker "marble baker", i.e., a baker of children's clay marbles. This lowly occupation became synonymous with the patrician class in NYC through Washington Irving's attribution of his History of New York (1809) to a fictitious author named Diedrich Knickerbocker... [more]
KOETSIER     Dutch
"Coachman, Coachdriver"... [more]
KOK     Dutch
It is a Dutch occupational surname, meaning cook.
KOLK     Dutch
"Kolk is Dutch for either whirlpool or canyon. Probably the name refers to wild water."
KOONINGS     Dutch
From the Dutch word "koning" meaning "king", thus meaning "of the king".
KOOP     Dutch (Modern)
Comes from the Biblical given name Jacob, meaning "he who supplants."
KRANE     Dutch, Low German
Dutch: nickname for a long-legged or tall thin man, from Middle Dutch crane ‘crane’. ... [more]
KUBA     Dutch, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish
From Kuba, a pet form of the personal name Jakub.
KUES     German, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
KUNIS     German, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name KONRAD.
LACHTRUP     Dutch
Means 'laughing group' in Dutch. Also occurs in Germany, but mostly in the Netherlands.
LANDERS     Dutch
Patronymic from Lander.
LANGHORN     English, Danish, Dutch
Northern English: probably a habitational name from a minor place in Soulby, Cumbria, called Longthorn, from Old English lang ‘long’ + horn ‘projecting headland’, or a topographic name with the same meaning.... [more]
LANSING     Dutch
Patronymic from Lans, Germanic Lanzo, a Dutch cognate of Lance.
LAWYER     Dutch (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Lauwer, an occupational name for a tanner or leather worker.
LEDGER     English, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’. The name was borne by a 7th-century bishop of Autun, whose fame contributed to the popularity of the name in France... [more]
LEMS     Dutch
"It is said that long ago there was a river in Holland named 'Lems'. Since then the river has dried up, but those who lived around the river were given the surname of 'Lems'.
LEONHARD     German, Dutch
Variant of Leonhardt.
LEONHARDT     German, Dutch
From the Germanic personal name Leonhard, composed of the elements leo "lion" and hard "hardy, brave, strong".
LEONHART     German, Dutch
Variant of Leonhardt.
LEX     German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Alexius, Alexis.
LIEM     Dutch
Habitual surname for Lieme in Eastphalia, which is from lim meaning "mire".
LILANDRIZ     Dutch
Last name, supposedly from Hollad
LILANDROZ     Dutch
Last name from Holland
LINDE     German, Dutch, Jewish, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a conspicuous lime tree, from Middle High German, Dutch linde, Scandinavian lind. There are several places, especially in North Germany, named with this word... [more]
LINDERS     Dutch
Dutch name from the Linder tree.
LINDT     German, Dutch
The Lindt surname comes from an Upper German word "lind," which meant "tender" or "gentle hearted." In some instances, especially in Saxony, the surname evolved from the personal name Lindemuth. In general, the similar phonetic name Linde comes from "Linden," which was a type of tree.... [more]
LOCHTE     Dutch, German
Variant of LICHTE.
LOCKE     English, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of Lock. ... [more]
LOEPP     Dutch
Variant of Loop.
LOEWEN     Dutch
Dutch variant of Loewe.
LOOP     Dutch
Habitational name from de Loop (meaning "the watercourse"), in the province of Antwerp.
LOSEE     Dutch (Anglicized)
Perhaps an Americanized spelling of Lossie, a vernacular derivative of the female personal name Lucia. Compare English Luce. This name was well established in the Hudson valley in the 18th century, which strengthens the likelihood that it is of Dutch origin.
LOSEY     Dutch
Probably of Dutch origin. See Losee.
LOUIS     English, French, Greek (Rare), Dutch
From the given name Louis. In Greece, it is known for Spyridon Louis.
LUBBEN     Low German, Dutch
Dutch and North German (Lübben) patronymic from German Lübbe, Dutch $Lubbe, short forms of the personal names Leopold and Lübbert (see Luebbert). Dutch from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Lodebert, a compound of hlod ‘famous’ + berht ‘bright’.
LUTTER     Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
LUX     German, Dutch
Patronymic from a vernacular form of Lucas.
LYMAN     English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
MAARSCHALKERWEERD     Dutch
Meaning "Keeper of the horses."
MACK     Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus). Shortened form of any of the many Scottish and Irish names beginning M(a)c-.... [more]
MACKIN     Dutch
Pet form of MACCO.
MALEFEIJT     Dutch
A variant spelling of Malefeyt. This is also actually an archaic spelling (as the sound written as -eijt will be always be written as -eit or -ijt in modern times), but it has (barely) managed to survive into modern times... [more]
MALEFEYT     Dutch (Archaic)
Archaic Dutch surname that is now no longer in use (not in this exact spelling, that is): the spelling reflects the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
MALEFIJT     Dutch
Modern form of Malefeyt, which is also the most common form of the surname. In The Netherlands, there were 24 bearers of the surname in 2007.
MALFEYT     Dutch, Flemish
Generally a Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Malfait, with the spelling reflecting the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
MALIN     English, French, Dutch
From the given name Malin (English), and from the given name Madalin composed of the Germanic element madal meaning "council" (French, Dutch).
MANES     Dutch
Variant of MAGNUS, MENNEN or a short form of GERMANUS.
MARKELL     Dutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’. Americanized form of Slovenian Markelj, a derivative of the personal name Marko, Latin Marcus, + the suffix -elj.
MARSMAN     Dutch
Dutch surname meaning "man from the marsh". Created in combination with the Dutch words "mars", (meaning marsh), and "man", (meaning man). Rare.
MARTENS     Low German, Dutch, English
North German and Dutch patronymic from Marten. English variant of Martins.
MASSE     English, French, Dutch
English: variant of Mace ... [more]
MAST     Dutch
Nickname for a tall, lanky man, from Middle Dutch mast "(ship's) mast".
MAST     Dutch
Occupational name for a swineherd, from Middle Dutch mast "swine fodder", or a topographic name for someone from a place rich in animal fodder, for example acorns.
MATHIAS     French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Dutch: from the personal name Mathias (see Matthew).... [more]
MATIAS     Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Czech
Spanish (Matías), Portuguese, and Dutch: from the personal name (see Matthew).... [more]
MATTHIAS     German, Dutch, English, Welsh, Greek
German and Dutch: from the personal name Matthias (see Matthew).... [more]
MEIJSTER     Dutch
From the German word meister meaning "master".
MESSIAEN     Dutch, French
Derived from Messiaen, the (archaic) Dutch form of the latinate first name Messianus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Roman praenomen Messus. The meaning of Messus is not wholly certain; it may be derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one"... [more]
METTE     German, Dutch
From a pet form of the female personal name MECHTHILD.
MICHELS     German, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
MICK     German, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name MIKOLAJ or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread". The name was reportedly taken from Germany to Ireland in the 18th century.
MIDDAG     Dutch
From the Dutch word for "Midday". The earliest/oldest records of the surname are found in the Netherlands (Holland).
MODDERMAN     Dutch
"Mud Man" was given to the people who built the dikes.
MOLENAAR     Dutch
Occupational name from molenaar "miller".
MOLNAR     Dutch
Variant of MOLENAAR.
NEESON     Irish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as McNeese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen. Surname made famous by the actor Liam Neeson
NETJES     Dutch
Netjes is from the Dutch word for "tidy, neat" or "decent, proper."
NIESEN     Dutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis). ... [more]
NIKKEL     German, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
NISWONGER     Dutch
"One who dwells in the clearing"
OELTJENBRUNS     Dutch (Archaic)
Unexplained Dutch surname.
OOSTERHUIS     Dutch
Oosterhuis is a Dutch surname meaning "eastern house".
OOSTWAL     Dutch
From the Dutch words oost meaning "East" and wal meaning "shore" or "bank".
ORLEY     Dutch, Flemish, English
A surname of uncertain origin found among the Dutch, Flemish and English. In England the name is primarily found in Yorkshire and Devon. Orley may be an adapted form of a French name D'Orley or a nickname for Orlando... [more]
OSTERHOUT     Dutch
From the town of Oosterhout,, meaning "East Wood", as it is located nearby forests in the east of the Netherlands. Primary modern usage is in the United States can be traced back to Jan Jensen van Oosterhoudt, who immigrated to New Amsterdam in the 17th Century, and has been generally been simplified to Osterhout, where the O is pronounced as "AW"... [more]
OUDENHOVEN     Dutch
Derived from Dutch oude "old" and hoeve "farm; farmstead; manor". As a surname it is derived from one of the many places of this name, for example in Menen, Passendale, Steenvoorde, Steenwerk, Broekburg or Godewaardsvelde.
OVERBEEKE     Dutch
Means "over/on brook" or "over/on stream" or "over/on creek"... [more]
PAUWELS     Flemish, Belgian
Pauwels is a Flemish patronymic surname derived from the personal name Pauwel, a vernacular form of Paul. It is listed as one of "the 100 most common Belgian family names in 2001 by region": 12th position in Belgium and specifically Flanders.
PAVEK     Dutch
Americanized spelling of PÁVEK.
PELT     Dutch
Dutch: shortened form of Van Pelt.
PENNING     English, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
PIEPER     Dutch
Occupational name for a piper.
PIETERS     Dutch
"Pieter's son"
PLAS     Dutch
PLUMER     German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
POSTHUMUS     Dutch, Low German
From a personal name which was given to a posthumous child, i.e., one born after the death of his father, derived from Latin postumus "last, last-born" (superlative of posterus "coming after, subsequent") via Late Latin posthumus, which was altered by association with Latin humare "to bury", suggesting death (i.e., thought to consist of post "after" and humus "grave", hence "after death"); the one born after the father's death obviously being the last.
PRIOR     English, Scottish, Dutch, German
Derived from Latin prior meaning "superior". It was used as an occupational surname for a prior, which is a head of a religious house, below an abbot.
PUDDEPHATT     Dutch
Form of Cooper, meaning barrell maker
QUACKENBUSH     Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Quackenbosch, a topographic name from Dutch quaak ‘swamp’ (cognate with the English word quagmire) + bosch ‘woodland’, ‘wilderness’.
RAAD     Dutch
Metonymic occupational name for an adviser, counselor, or member of a town council, from raad ‘advice’, ‘counsel’.
RAAT     Dutch
''Somebody who gives good advice'', ''counsel'' Raad = advice.... [more]
REDDING     English, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
REDIG     Dutch, Upper German
Dutch and North German variant of Redding.
REESE     Low German, Dutch, German
Nickname for a very big man, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rese ‘giant’.... [more]
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