English (British) Submitted Surnames

These names are a subset of English names used more often in Britain. See also about English names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABSTONEnglish (British)
The surname Abston is of an uncertain origin. Perhaps from an English place name, but not now recorded in England as a surname. One possibility is Abson near Bristol, earlier Abston; another is Adstone in Northamptonshire, which is named from an Old English personal name Ættīn + Old English tūn ‘settlement’.
AGATEEnglish (British)
From Middle English gate, meaning a "gate" or "street", denoting a person who lived near a major city gate or street.
ARBORNEEnglish (British)
A surname found in England as well as in America. This surname has been attached to Americans of English ancestry.
ATHENSEnglish (British)
British Artist and Violinist Faithe-Lynne Athens' last name
AUDISHEnglish (British)
Audish was first found in the counties of Norfolk, Suffolk and Lincolnshire in the south of England, people who had the surname 'Audish' were wealthy landowners, thus held in high esteem.
BACKHURSTEnglish (British)
Meaning bake house or wood cutter
BEEDENEnglish (British)
Probably means "from Beeden", a village near Newbury in Berkshire. Ultimately coming from either Old English byden, meaning "shallow valley", or from the pre 7th century personal name Bucge with the suffix dun, meaning "hill of Bucge".
BICKNELLEnglish (British)
Contracted form of the placename Bickenhill in Somerset, England.
BONSALLEnglish (British)
This is a locational name which originally derived from the village of Bonsall, near Matlock in Derbyshire. The name is Norse-Viking, pre 10th Century and translates as 'Beorns-Halh' - with 'Beorn' being a personal name meaning 'Hero' and 'Halh' a piece of cultivated land - a farm.
BOOKEnglish (British)
The surname Book originated from the UK. When and where are still under investigation, however we believe it maybe within the Manchester area.
BUTTERYEnglish (British)
The baker in Old English.
BYTHESEAEnglish (British)
Habitational name for someone who lived near the sea, this name is nearly extinct in England today.
BYTHEWOODEnglish (British)
A nearly extinct habitational surname for one who lived near, by or around a wooded (forested) area.
CARSTAIRSEnglish (British)
From the manor or barony of the same name in the parish of Carstairs (= 1170 Casteltarres, 'Castle of Tarres').
CHIPSEnglish (British)
Chips is a rare English (british) last name which is a nickname of Christopher and Charles
CHOULESEnglish (British, Rare)
The surname Choules is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a variant of Scholes, itself "a topographical name for someone who lived in a rough hut or shed", from the Northern Middle English 'scale, schole'... [more]
CLINKEREnglish (British, ?)
Possibly a varient of Clinger.
COVERDALEEnglish (British)
From the valley (Dale) of the river Cover.... [more]
COWENScottish, English (British)
Scottish and northern English: variant spelling of Cowan.
DODSONEnglish (British)
Means "son of Dodd" (see DUDDA).
EADEEnglish (British, ?)
Originally derived from the Old English Eadwig, which meant "prosperity / fortune in war." Surname found mainly in Scotland and northern England. Americanized spelling of Norwegian Eide. Also see the similar given names: Adam, Edwy, Eda, and Edith.
ELESTIALEnglish (British, Modern, Rare)
First used as a surname in September 2000, first appearing on a birth certificate in July 2009. Meaning "protected by angels"; the origin is an adopted surname from a type of quartz crystal, often referred to as a new millennium crystal... [more]
ELSEGOODEnglish (British), English (Australian)
Derived from an Old English given name, possibly *Ælfgod or *Æðelgod, in which the second element is god "god". (Another source gives the meaning "temple-god", presumably from ealh and god.)... [more]
ETHERINGTONEnglish (British)
An Old English surname from Kent, the village of Etherington, which derives from the Old English "Ethel"red' ing (meaning people of, coming from) and "ton" a town/village.
FARRAREnglish (British)
Northern English: occupational name for a smith or worker in iron, from Middle English and Old French farrour, ferour, from medieval Latin ferrator, an agent derivative of ferrare ‘to shoe horses’, from ferrum ‘iron’, in medieval Latin ‘horseshoe’... [more]
FIANDEREnglish (British)
The Fiander surname may have it's origins in Normandy, France (possibly from the old-French "Vyandre"), but is an English (British) surname from the Dorset county region. The Fiander name can also be found in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia, Canada the origins of which can be traced back to the mid-1700's in the village of Milton Abbas, Dorsetshire.
FISKEnglish (British)
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone supposedly resembling a fish in some way, from Old Norse fiskr ‘fish’ (cognate with Old English fisc).
FURNESSEnglish (British)
It originated from the river in England.
GILSTRAPEnglish (British, Anglicized, Rare)
This is a place name acquired from once having lived at a place spelled Gill(s)thorp(e), Gilsthorp(e), Gill(s)throp(e) or Gil(s)throp(e) located in the Old Danelaw area of England.... [more]
GRAYLINGEnglish (British)
Uncommon surname of unclear origin; possible medieval locational name, or a derivative of the French surname Grail or the diminutive Graillon.... [more]
HARKEREnglish (British)
English (mainly northeastern England and West Yorkshire): habitational name from either of two places in Cumbria, or from one in the parish of Halsall, near Ormskirk, Lancashire. The Cumbrian places are probably named from Middle English hart ‘male deer’ + kerr ‘marshland’... [more]
HARKNESSScottish, English (British), Northern Irish
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place (perhaps in the area of Annandale, with which the surname is connected in early records), probably so called from the Old English personal name Hereca (a derivative of the various compound names with the first element here ‘army’) + Old English næss ‘headland’, ‘cape’... [more]
HARMEREnglish (British)
Meaning, of the Army or man of Armor, from the battle at Normandy, France. It was formerly a French last name Haremere after the battle at Normandy it moved on to England where it was shortened to Harmer.
HAZLETTEnglish (British)
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hazel copse, Old English hæslett (a derivative of hæsel ‘hazel’). habitational name from Hazelhead or Hazlehead in Lancashire and West Yorkshire, derived from Old English hæsel ‘hazel’ + heafod ‘head’, here in the sense of ‘hill’; also a topographic name of similar etymological origin.
HENSLEY-BOOKEnglish (British)
The surname Hensley-Book was originated in December 2013 in Bath by Samuel Book who changed his name by deed poll. His name changed when his grandfather, Michael King was near death. Mr King always wanted the name Hensley, which was Michael's middle name to carry on in the family... [more]
HODGSONEnglish (British)
English patronymic form of the personal name Hodge, a pet form of Rodger. The surname in most cases originated in the North Yorskire Dales, where it is still common to the present day.
HOLLOMANEnglish (British)
Nickname, perhaps ironic, from Middle English holy ‘holy’ + man ‘man’.
ILESEnglish (British), French
English (mainly Somerset and Gloucestershire): topographic name from Anglo-Norman French isle ‘island’ (Latin insula) or a habitational name from a place in England or northern France named with this element.
INMANEnglish (British)
Anglo-Saxon in Origin. Occupational surname given to a person who "tended a lodge or an inn". Surname first found in Lancashire, England.
JIMERSONEnglish (British), Scottish
Variant of Scottish and northern English Jameson, based on a pet form of the personal name.
KLOSSEnglish (British)
Surname from the model, Karlie Kloss (1992-)
LATHAMEnglish (British)
Habitational name from any of the places in England named with the Old Norse word hlaða meaning "barn".
LITTLEWOODEnglish (British)
This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and may be either a locational or topographical surname. If the former, it derives from any of several minor places in West Yorkshire, such as Littlewood in Wooldale near Holmfirth, all of which are so called from the Olde English pre 7th Century "lytel", little, small, and "wudu", wood... [more]
LOKIEREnglish (British)
Variant of Lockyer, an occupational name for a locksmith.
LUCIANEnglish (British, Rare)
Derived from the given name Lucian
MATTINGLYEnglish (British)
This name dates all the way back to the 1200s and research shows that Mattingly families began immigrating to the United States in the 1600s and continued until the 1900s. However, the place name (Mattingley, England) dates back to the year 1086, but spelled as Matingelege... [more]
MENEARCornish, English (British)
English (Devon; of Cornish origin): topographic name for someone who lived by a menhir, i.e. a tall standing stone erected in prehistoric times (Cornish men ‘stone’ + hir ‘long’). In the United States, it is a common surname in Pennsylvania & West Virginia.
MIMSEnglish (British)
Habitational name from Mimms (North and South Mimms) in Hertfordshire, most probably derived from an ancient British tribal name, Mimmas.
NEWBROUGHEnglish (British)
Newbrough surname is thought to be a habitational, taken on from a place name such as from Newbrough in Northumberland, which is derived from the Old English words niwe, meaning "new," and burh, meaning "fortification."
OLMSTEADEnglish (British)
Comes from the Old French ermite "hermit" and Old English stede "place".... [more]
PILKINGTONEnglish (British), Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, England.
PINCHESEnglish (British, Rare)
This is one of the very earliest of surnames. This is an English name. First recorded in the 12th century it was a nickname of endearment for a bright, chirpy, person, thought by his peer group to be active like a finch... [more]
PRESHAWEnglish (British, Rare)
This surname is a habitational name from a locality near Upham on the slopes of the South Downs. It is entirely within a private estate and has its own chapel.
PUTTICKEnglish (British)
A variant spelling of the Sussex surname Puttock from the Village of Puttock, which itself derives from the Old English "Puttocke" a bird of prey, the kite. ... [more]
QUESTEDEnglish (British)
English surname of uncertain origin, possibly derived from the lost village of Questers.
ROWSONEnglish (British, Anglicized)
The ancestors of the Rowson family first reached the shores of England in the wave of migration after the Norman Conquest of 1066. Their name is derived from the Norman given name Ralph. This name, which also occurs as Ralf, Rolf, and Raoul, is adapted from the Old French given name Raol.... [more]
SEEKINSEnglish (British)
Probably a variant of English Seekings, a Cambridgeshire name of unexplained etymology.
SEWALLEnglish (British, Modern)
Dates back at least to Middle English (1500s or earlier); many believe it is Saxon in origin; "may mean "sea" and "victory" or "war""
SHAKESHAFTEnglish (British)
Similar in origin to surnames such as Shakesheave, Shakespeare and Wagstaffe.
SHEFFIELDEnglish, English (British)
A surname which named after an city in England.... [more]
SNAPEEnglish (British), Scottish
An old, now rare surname, with various origins in Suffolk and Yorkshire in England and Lanarkshire in Scotland. This is also the name of Severus Snape, a character from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter book series.
SPAULDINGEnglish (British)
Variant spelling of Spalding.
SPRADLINEnglish (British)
Originally Spradling, mean one who spreads seed
SPURRELLEnglish (British, Rare)
Most likely from a place called Spirewell in southern Devon.
SPURRILLEnglish (British, Rare)
Most likely from a place called Spirewell in southern Devon.
STANSFIELDEnglish (British)
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, probably named with the genitive case of the Old English personal name Stan "stone" and Old English feld "pasture, open country". It may also be a topographic name from Middle English stanesfeld "open country of the (standing) stone"... [more]
STIRRUPEnglish (British)
Originated in Merseyside, England.
STURGESSEnglish (British)
popular in 1680 in England.
STYLINSONEnglish (British)
Juxtaposed names Styles and Tomlinson, used to represent (relation)ship between Louis Tomlinson and Harry Styles (Larry Stylinson).
SUGGEnglish (British)
Surname of internet personalities Zoe and Joe Sugg. Zoe is known as Zoella on the website YouTube and has a book on sale called "Girl Online". Joe is also a YouTuber.
SYNGEEnglish (British)
First found in Shropshire where they had been anciently seated as Lords of the Manor of Bridgenorth, from the time of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 A.D.
TALLANTEnglish (British, ?), Norman, Irish
English (of Norman origin) occupational name for a tailor or nickname for a good swordsman, from taillant ‘cutting’, present participle of Old French tailler ‘to cut’ (Late Latin taliare, from talea ‘(plant) cutting’)... [more]
TATLOWEnglish (British, Rare)
I heard it was from a small village in England called Tallow.
TEMPESTEnglish (British)
English (Yorkshire): nickname for someone with a blustery temperament, from Middle English, Old French tempest(e) ‘storm’ (Latin tempestas ‘weather’, ‘season’, a derivative of tempus ‘time’).
TRAINEnglish (British), English (Devon)
English (Devon): 1. metonymic occupational name for a trapper or hunter, from Middle English trayne, Old French traine ‘guile’, ‘snare’, ‘trap’. ... [more]
VICARYEnglish (British)
There are a number of theories as to the origins of the name, Spanish sailors shipwrecked after the Armada and French Huguenots fleeing the Revolution are two of the more romantic ones. It is more likely to have come as someone associated with the church - the vicar, who carried out the pastoral duties on behalf of the absentee holder of a benefice... [more]
VININGEnglish (British)
Habitational name for someone from a place called Fyning in Rogate in Sussex.
WALDRONMedieval German, Old Norman, Scottish Gaelic, English (British)
Derived from the German compound wala-hran, literally "wall raven", but originally meaning "strong bird". Also derived from the Gaelic wealdærn, meaning "forest dwelling", thought to be derived from the Sussex village of Waldron... [more]
WEDMOREEnglish (British)
Habitational name from Wedmore in Somerset, recorded in the 9th century as Wethmor, possibly meaning ‘marsh (Old English mor) used for hunting (w?the)’.
WELBYEnglish (British, Rare)
Lincolnshire family name
WELLANDEnglish (British, Rare)
From the name of the place, derived from Old English wig - war and landa - territory, land.
WHEELWRIGHTEnglish (British)
Middle English "maker of wheels"
WHITCOMBEnglish (British)
means wide valley
WINTERBOURNEEnglish (British)
Probably meaning "winter stream". A large village in Gloucestershire, From the Thomas Hardy novel "The Woodlanders".
WOLSTENHOLMEEnglish (British, Rare)
A famous bearer is Chris Wolstenholme, bassist and sometimes vocalist of British alternative rock band Muse.
WOLVERIDGEEnglish (British)
Derived from the personal name WULFRIC.
WOODGEREnglish (British)
Woodger comes from the occupation of wood cutter in old english
WORSHIPEnglish (British)
Registered with the Guild of One Name Studies... [more]
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