Surnames Categorized "word names"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include word names.
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ABATE Italian
From Italian abate meaning "abbot, priest", derived via Latin and Greek from an Aramaic word meaning "father". This was used either as a nickname or an occupational name for a worker in a priest's house.
ABBEY English
Indicated a person who lived near an abbey or worked in an abbey, from Middle English abbeye.
ALLAWAY Scottish
From a Scottish place name, itself derived from alla "wild" and mhagh "field".
ANTIĆ Serbian, Croatian
Means "son of ANTO" or "son of ANTE (1)".
APPLEBY English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English æppel "apple" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
ARCHER English
Occupational name for one who practiced archery, from Latin arcus "bow" (via Old French).
ARENA Italian
Italian cognate of ARENAS.
ARMSTRONG English
Means "strong arm" from Middle English. Tradition holds that the family is descended from Siward, an 11th-century Earl of Northumbria. Famous bearers of this name include the Americans Louis Armstrong (1901-1971), a jazz musician, and Neil Armstrong (1930-2012), an astronaut who was the first person to walk on the moon.
ARTS (1) Dutch
Means "son of AART".
ASH English
From Old English æsc meaning "ash tree", indicating a person who lived near ash trees.
ASHWORTH English
From an English place name meaning "ash enclosure" in Old English.
ATWATER English
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the water".
ATWOOD English
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the wood".
BÄCKER German
Variant of BECKER, mostly found in northern Germany.
BADCOCK English
From a diminutive of the medieval given name BADA.
BAKER English
Occupational name meaning "baker", derived from Middle English bakere.
BALDWIN English
Derived from the given name BALDWIN.
BALL English
From Middle English bal, Old English beall meaning "ball". This was either a nickname for a rotund or bald person, or a topographic name for someone who lived near a ball-shaped feature.
BANKS English
Originally indicated someone who lived near a hillside or a bank of land.
BANNER English
Occupational name for a flag carrier, derived from Old French baniere meaning "banner", ultimately of Germanic origin.
BANNISTER English
From Norman French banastre meaning "basket". This was originally a name for a maker of baskets.
BARBER English, Scottish
Indicated a barber, one who cut hair for a living.
BARENDS Dutch
Means "son of BAREND".
BARKER English
From Middle English bark meaning "to tan". This was an occupational name for a leather tanner.
BASS English
English cognate of BASSO.
BATTLE English
From a nickname for a combative person. In some cases it may come from the name of English places called Battle, so named because they were sites of battles.
BAYER German
Originally denoted a person from Bavaria, from its German name BAYERN.
BEAN English
English cognate of BOHN.
BECK (4) English
From Old English becca meaning "pickaxe", an occupational surname.
BELCHER English
From a Middle English version of Old French bel chiere meaning "beautiful face". It later came to refer to a person who had a cheerful and pleasant temperament.
BELL (1) English
From Middle English belle meaning "bell". It originated as a nickname for a person who lived near the town bell, or who had a job as a bell-ringer.
BERRY English
Derived from a place name, which was derived from Old English burh "fortification".
BEST (1) English
Derived from Middle English beste meaning "beast", an occupational name for a keeper of animals or a nickname for someone who acted like a beast. A famous bearer of this surname was soccer legend George Best (1946-2005).
BIRD English
Occupational name for a person who raised or hunted birds.
BISHOP English
Means simply "bishop", ultimately from Greek επισκοπος (episkopos) meaning "overseer". It probably originally referred to a person who served a bishop.
BLACK English
Means either "black" (from Old English blæc) or "pale" (from Old English blac). It could refer to a person with a pale or a dark complexion, or a person who worked with black dye.
BLACKBURN English
From the name of a city in Lancashire, meaning "black stream" in Old English.
BLACKMAN English
From a nickname, a variant of BLACK.
BLACKWOOD English, Scottish
From an English place name meaning "black wood".
BLOODWORTH English
Originally indicated someone from the town of Blidworth in Nottinghamshire, which was derived from the Old English byname Blīþa (meaning "happy, blithe") combined with worð "enclosure".
BLUE English
From a nickname for a person with blue eyes or blue clothing.
BOND English
Occupational name for a peasant farmer, from Middle English bonde.
BONE (1) English
Derived from Old French bon meaning "good".
BONNET French
From the given name BONITUS.
BOON (3) Dutch
Dutch cognate of BOHN.
BOOTH English
Topographic name derived from Middle English both meaning "hut, stall".
BOTH Dutch
From the Low German given name BODE.
BOWMAN English
Occupational name for an archer, derived from Middle English bowe, Old English boga meaning "bow".
BRAND German, English
Derived from the Germanic given name BRANDO or its Old Norse cognate BRANDR.
BRASHER English
Means "brass worker", derived from Old English bræs "brass".
BRAY English
From a place name derived from Cornish bre "hill".
BREWER English
Occupational name for a maker of ale or beer.
BREWSTER English
Variant of BREWER, originally a feminine form of the occupational term.
BROADBENT English
From a place name derived from Old English brad "broad" and beonet "bent grass".
BROOK English
Denoted a person who lived near a brook, a word derived from Old English broc.
BROOKS English
Variant of BROOK.
BROWN English
Originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin. A notable bearer is Charlie Brown from the Peanuts comic strip by Charles Schulz.
BROWNLOW English
From Old English brun meaning "brown" and hlaw meaning "mound, small hill". The name was probably given to a family living on a small hill covered with bracken.
BULL English
From a nickname for a person who acted like a bull.
BULLOCK English
From a nickname meaning "young bull".
BUNKER English
Derived from Old French bon cuer meaning "good heart".
BUREAU French
From Old French burel, diminutive of bure, a type of woolen cloth. It may have originated as a nickname for a person who dressed in the material or as an occupational name for someone who worked with it.
BURNS (1) English, Scottish
Derived from Old English burna "stream, spring". A famous bearer was the Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796).
BUSH English
Originally a name for a person who lived near a prominent bush or thicket.
BUTCHER English
Occupational name for a butcher, derived from Old French bouchier.
BUTLER English, Irish
Occupational name derived from Norman French butiller "wine steward", ultimately from Late Latin butticula "bottle". A famous bearer of this surname is the fictional character Rhett Butler, created by Margaret Mitchell for her novel Gone with the Wind (1936).
BUTTS English
From a nickname meaning "thick, stumpy", from Middle English butt.
CANNON English
From the ecclesiastical usage of canon, referring to a church official or servant who worked in a clergy house.
CARPENTER English
From the occupation, derived from Middle English carpentier (ultimately from Latin carpentarius meaning "carriage maker").
CARTER English
Occupational name for a person who operated a cart to transport goods, from Norman French caretier. A famous bearer is the former American president Jimmy Carter (1924-).
CARVER English
Occupational surname for a carver, from Middle English kerve "cut".
CASTLE English
From Middle English castel meaning "castle", from Late Latin castellum, originally indicating a person who lived near a castle.
CAUSER English
Occupational name for one who made leggings, derived from Old French chausse "leggings".
CHAMBERS English
From Old French chambre meaning "chamber, room", an occupational name for a person who worked in the inner rooms of a mansion.
CHANCE English
From a nickname for a lucky person or a gambler.
CHASE English
Occupational name for a hunter, from Middle English chase "hunt".
CHEVALIER French
From a nickname derived from French chevalier meaning "knight", itself from cheval meaning "horse", ultimately from Latin caballus.
CHOW Chinese
Alternate transcription of Chinese (see ZHOU).
CHURCH English
From the English word, derived from Old English cirice, ultimately from Greek κυριακον (kyriakon) meaning "(house) of the lord". It probably referred to a person who lived close to a church.
CLAY English
Means simply "clay", originally referring to a person who lived near or worked with of clay.
CLEMENT English
Derived from the given name CLEMENT.
CLOSE English
From Middle English clos meaning "enclosure", a topographic name for someone who lived near a courtyard or farmyard.
COCK English
Derived from the medieval nickname cok meaning "rooster, cock". The nickname was commonly added to given names to create diminutives such as Hancock or Alcock.
COLT English
Occupational name for a keeper of horses, derived from Middle English colt.
COMBS English
Variant of COOMBS.
CONSTABLE English
From Old French conestable, ultimately from Latin comes stabuli meaning "officer of the stable".
COOK English
Derived from Old English coc meaning "cook", ultimately from Latin coquus. It was an occupational name for a cook, a man who sold cooked meats, or a keeper of an eating house.
COUCH Cornish
From Cornish cough "red", indicating the original bearer had red hair.
COUTURE French
Means "tailor" in Old French.
COY English
Means "quiet, shy, coy" from Middle English coi.
CRISP English
English cognate of CRESPO.
CROPPER English
Occupational name derived from Middle English croppe "crop", referring to a fruit picker or a crop reaper.
CROSS English
Locative name meaning "cross", ultimately from Latin crux. It denoted one who lived near a cross symbol or near a crossroads.
CROUCH English
Variant of CROSS.
CURRY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó COMHRAIDHE or Ó CORRA.
DALE English
From Old English dæl meaning "valley", originally indicating a person who lived there.
DAM Dutch, Danish
Means "dike, dam" in Dutch and Danish. In modern Danish it also means "pond".
DAY English
From a diminutive form of DAVID.
DEAN (2) English
Occupational surname meaning "dean", referring to a person who either was a dean or worked for one. It is from Middle English deen (ultimately from Latin decanus meaning "chief of ten").
DEFOREST French
Means "from the forest" in French.
DENMAN English
From Middle English dene "valley" combined with man.
DERBY English
Variant of DARBY.
DICK English
From the given name DICK (1).
DOCTOR English
Originally denoted someone who was a doctor, ultimately from Latin doctor meaning "teacher".
DODGE English
From Dogge, a medieval diminutive of ROGER.
DOWNER English
Name for someone who lived on or near a down, which an English word meaning "hill".
DRAKE English
Derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent".
DRAPER English
Occupational name for a maker or seller of woolen cloth, from Anglo-Norman French draper (Old French drapier, an agent derivative of drap "cloth").
DRIES Dutch
From the given name DRIES.
DUKE English
From the noble title, which was originally from Latin dux "leader". It was a nickname for a person who behaved like a duke, or who worked in a duke's household.
DURANT English, French
Variation of DURAND.
DYER English
Occupational name meaning "cloth dyer", from Old English deah "dye".
EARL English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl meaning "nobleman, warrior". It was either a nickname for one who acted like an earl, or an occupational name for a person employed by an earl.
EGGER German
South German occupational name meaning "plowman" or "farmer", derived from German eggen "to harrow, to plow".
ELDER English
Derived from Old English ealdra meaning "older", used to distinguish two people who had the same name.
ENGLISH English
Denoted a person who was of English heritage. It was used to distinguish people who lived in border areas (for example, near Wales or Scotland). It was also used to distinguish an Anglo-Saxon from a Norman.
EVERS Dutch
Means "son of EVERT".
FAIRBURN English
From a place name meaning "fern stream", from Old English fearn "fern" and burna "stream".
FAIRCHILD English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English.
FAN Chinese
From Chinese (fàn) meaning "bee".
FARMER English
Occupational name for a tax collector, from Middle English ferme "rent, revenue, provision", from Medieval Latin firma, ultimately from Old English feorm. This word did not acquire its modern meaning until the 17th century.
FEAR English
Derived from Middle English feare meaning "friend, comrade".
FIDDLER English
English form of FIEDLER.
FIELDS English
Name for a person who lived on or near a field or pasture, from Old English feld.
FISHMAN English
Occupational name for a fisherman.
FLETCHER English
Occupational name for a fletcher, someone who attached feathers to the shaft of an arrow. It is derived from Old French fleche meaning "arrow".
FORD English
Name given to someone who lived by a ford, possibly the official who maintained it. A famous bearer was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
FOREST English, French
Originally belonged to a person who lived near or in a forest. It was probably originally derived, via Old French forest, from Latin forestam (silva) meaning "outer (wood)".
FORESTER English
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see FOREST).
FORTUNE English
From Middle English, ultimately from Latin fortuna meaning "fortune, luck, chance". This was possibly a nickname for a gambler.
FOSTER (4) English
Nickname given to a person who was a foster child or foster parent.
FOWLER English
Occupational name for a fowler or birdcatcher, ultimately derived from Old English fugol meaning "bird".
FOX English
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
FRANK (2) English
From Old English franc meaning "free".
FREEMAN English
Referred to a person who was born free, or in other words was not a serf.
FRISK Swedish
From Swedish frisk "healthy", which was derived from the Middle Low German word vrisch "fresh, young, frisky".
FROST English, German
From Old English and Old High German meaning "frost", a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
FRY English
From Old English frig (a variant of freo) meaning "free".
FULLER English
Occupational name for a fuller, a person who thickened and cleaned coarse cloth by pounding it. It is derived via Middle English from Latin fullo.
GANG Korean
Variant romanization of KANG.
GARB German
Variant of GARBER.
GARDENER English
Occupational surname for one who was a gardener, from Old French jardin meaning "garden" (of Frankish origin).
GARLAND English
Means "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. It originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
GARNER (1) English
From Old French gernier meaning "granary", a derivative of Latin granum meaning "grain". This name could refer to a person who worked at a granary or lived near one.
GAŠPER Slovene
Derived from the given name GAŠPER.
GLADWIN English
Derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLASS English, German
From Old English glæs or Old High German glas meaning "glass". This was an occupational name for a glass blower or glazier.
GLOVER English
Occupational name for a person who made or sold gloves, from Middle English glovere.
GOOD English
From a nickname meaning "good", referring to a kindly person.
GOODMAN English
Variant of GOOD.
GOODWIN English
Derived from the given name GODWINE.
GORE English
From the Old English word gara meaning "triangular plot of land".
GRANT English, Scottish
Derived from Norman French meaning "grand, tall, large, great".
GRAVES English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
GRAY English
From a nickname for a person who had grey hair or grey clothes.
GREEN English
Descriptive name for someone who often wore the colour green or someone who lived near the village green.
GREENSPAN Jewish
Anglicized form of German Grünspan meaning "verdigris". Verdigris is the green-blue substance that forms on copper.
GREY English
Variant of GRAY.
GRIEVE Scottish
Occupational name meaning "steward, farm manager" in Middle English, related to the German title Graf.
GROSS German
Variant of GROß.
GROSSER German
Variant of GROß.
GROVES English
From Old English graf meaning "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
GULLY English
Nickname for a big person, from Middle English golias meaning "giant" (ultimately from GOLIATH, the Philistine warrior who was slain by David in the Old Testament).
HAGGARD English
From a nickname meaning "wild, untamed, worn", from Old French, ultimately from a Germanic root.
HALE English
Derived from Old English halh meaning "nook, recess, hollow".
HALL English, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Means simply "hall", given to one who either lived in or worked in a hall (the house of a medieval noble).
HARDEN English
From a place name meaning "hare valley" in Old English.
HARDING English
Derived from the given name HEARD. A famous bearer was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
HARDWICK English
From Old English heord "herd" and wíc "village, town".
HARDY English, French
From Old French and Middle English hardi meaning "bold, daring, hardy", of Germanic origin.
HARPER English
Originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps.
HART English
Means "male deer". It was originally acquired by a person who lived in a place frequented by harts, or bore some resemblance to a hart.
HAWK English
Originally a nickname for a person who had a hawk-like appearance or who acted in a fierce manner, derived from Old English heafoc "hawk".
HAWKING English
From a diminutive of HAWK. A famous bearer was the British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018).
HAYWOOD English
From various place names meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HEAD English
From Middle English hed meaning "head", from Old English heafod. It may have referred to a person who had a peculiar head, who lived near the head of a river or valley, or who served as the village headman.
HEATH English
Originally belonged to a person who was a dweller on the heath or open land.
HERTZ German
Derived from Middle High German herze meaning "heart", a nickname for a big-hearted person.
HEYMAN Jewish
From the given name CHAYYIM.
HICKEY Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó hÍcidhe meaning "descendant of the healer".
HIGHTOWER English
Possibly a variant of HAYTER.
HILL English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a hill, derived from Old English hyll.
HOLT English, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
From Old English, Old Dutch and Old Norse holt meaning "forest".
HOMEWOOD English
From various place names derived from Old English ham meaning "home" and wudu meaning "wood".
HOOKER English
Originally applied to one who lived near a river bend or corner of some natural feature, from Old English hoc "angle, hook".
HOOPER English
Occupational name for someone who put the metal hoops around wooden barrels.
HOPE English
Derived from Middle English hop meaning "small valley".
HOPPER English
Occupational name for an acrobat or a nickname for someone who was nervous or restless. A famous bearer was the American actor Dennis Hopper (1936-2010).
HORN English, German, Norwegian, Danish
From the Germanic word horn meaning "horn". This was an occupational name for one who carved objects out of horn or who played a horn, or a person who lived near a horn-shaped geographical feature, such as a mountain or a bend in a river.
HOUSE English
Referred to a person who lived or worked in a house, as opposed to a smaller hut.
HUFF English
Means "spur of a hill", from Old English hoh.
HULL English
Variant of HILL.
HUNT English
Variant of HUNTER.
HUNTER English, Scottish
Occupational name that referred to someone who hunted for a living, from Old English hunta.
JACK English, Scottish
From the given name JACK.
JEWEL English
Variant of JEWELL.
JOINER English
Occupational name for a carpenter (that is, a person who joins wood together to make furniture).
KEEN English
From Old English cene meaning "bold, brave".
KEYS (2) Irish
Anglicized form of MAC AODHA.
KING English
From Old English cyning "king", originally a nickname for someone who either acted in a kingly manner or who worked for or was otherwise associated with a king.
KISS Hungarian
Variant of KIS.
KITCHEN English
Occupational name for a person who worked in a kitchen (of a monastery for example), derived from Old English cycene, ultimately from Latin coquina.
KNIGHT English
From Old English cniht meaning "knight", a tenant serving as a mounted soldier.
LACY English
Derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name that was Latinized as Lascius.
LAGER Swedish
Means "laurel" in Swedish.
LAM Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of LIN.
LANE (1) English
Originally designated one who lived by a lane, a narrow way between fences or hedges, later used of any narrow pathway, including one between houses in a town.
LAW English
Derived from Old English hlaw "hill".
LEACH English
Originally indicated a person who was a physician, from the medieval practice of using leeches to bleed people of ills.
LEE (1) English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a leah, Old English meaning "woodland, clearing".
LISTER Scottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac an Fleisdeir meaning "son of the arrow maker".
LITTLE English
Meaning simply "little", it was originally a nickname given to a short person.
LOCKWOOD English
From an English place name meaning "enclosed wood".
LONG English
Originally a nickname for a person who had long limbs or who was tall.
LONGSTAFF English
Occupational name for an official who was equipped with a ceremonial staff, or a nickname for a tall person.
LOVE English
From the Old English given name Lufu meaning "love".
LOW English
Variant of LAW.
LYNCH Irish
From Irish Ó Loingsigh meaning "descendant of Loingseach", a given name meaning "mariner".
MADDEN Irish
Anglicized form of Ó MADAIDHÍN.
MAN Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of WEN.
MARK English
Derived from the given name MARK.
MARSHALL English
Derived from Middle English mareschal "marshal", ultimately from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant". It originally referred to someone who took care of horses.
MARTIN English, French, German, Czech
Derived from the given name MARTIN.
MASON English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, ultimately of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
MAY English
Derived from the given name MATTHEW.
MEADOWS English
Referred to one who lived in a meadow, from Old English mædwe.
MESSER German
Occupational name for a person who made knives, from Middle High German messer "knife".
MILES English
From the given name MILES.
MILLER English
Occupational surname referring to a person who owned or worked in a grain mill, from Middle English mille "mill".
MILLHOUSE English
Name for someone whose house was in a mill or who worked in a mill.
MILLS English
Originally given to one who lived near a mill or who worked in a mill, from Middle English mille.
MOLES Catalan
From Catalan mola meaning "millstone".
MOON (1) Korean
Korean form of WEN, from Sino-Korean (mun).
MOON (3) Irish
Variant of MOHAN.
MOULD English
From the given name Mauld, a medieval form of MATILDA.
MUTTON English
Referred to a shepherd or else someone who in some way resembled a sheep, derived from Norman French mouton "sheep".
NANA Italian
From a diminutive of GIOVANNI.
NEWPORT English
Given to one who came from the town of Newport (which means simply "new port"), which was the name of several English towns.
NORTH English
Name for a person who lived to the north.
OFFERMANS Dutch
From Dutch offer meaning "offering, donation", referring to a person who collected money in a church.
OUTLAW English
Means simply "outlaw" from Middle English outlawe.
OUTTERRIDGE English
Derived from the Old English given name UHTRIC.
PACE Italian
Derived from the Italian given name Pace meaning "peace".
PADMORE English
Originally indicated a person from Padmore in England, derived from Old English padde "toad" and mor "moor, marsh".
PAGE English, French
Occupational name meaning "servant, page". It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PAIN English
Variant of PAYNE.
PÁL Hungarian
Derived from the given name PÁL.
PALMER English
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PAN (1) Provençal
Means "baker", from Latin panis meaning "bread".
PANDER Dutch
Variant of PENDERS.
PARENT English, French
Derived from Old French parent meaning either "notable" (from Latin pārēre meaning "to be apparent") or "parent" (from Latin parere meaning "to produce, to give birth").
PARK (2) English
From Middle English park, from Latin parricus, of Germanic origin. This was a name for someone who worked in or lived in a park.
PARRY Welsh
Derived from ap Harry meaning "son of HARRY".
PEACOCK English
From Middle English pecok meaning "peacock". It was originally a nickname for a proud or haughty person.
PEAK English
Originally indicated a dweller by a pointed hill, from Old English peac "peak". It could also denote a person from the Peak District in Derbyshire, England.
PECK (2) English
Occupational name for a maker of pecks (vessels used as peck measures), derived from Middle English pekke.
PEEL English
Nickname for a thin person, derived from Old French pel, Latin palus meaning "stake, post" (related to English pole).
PENNY English
Nickname meaning "penny, coin" from Old English penning.
PESTY Hungarian
Variant of PESTI.
PETRI Italian
Derived from the given name PIETRO.
PICKLE English
Derived from Middle English pighel meaning "small field".
PIERCE English
From the given name PIERS.
PLANK German, English
Means "plank", from Old French, itself from Late Latin planca. This could have referred to a person who lived by a plank bridge over a stream, someone who was thin, or a carpenter.
POND English
Originally referred to one who lived near a pond.
PORTER English
Occupational name meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
POTTER English
Occupational name for a potter, one who makes earthen vessels.
POUND English
Occupational name for a person who kept animals, from Old English pund "animal enclosure".
POWER (2) English
From Middle English povre meaning "poor", via Old French from Latin pauper. It could have been a nickname for someone who had no money or a miser.
PRICE Welsh
Derived from Welsh ap Rhys, which means "son of RHYS".
PROUDFOOT English
Nickname for a person with a proud step.
QUEEN English
From a given name that was derived from Old English cwen meaning "queen, woman". In some occurrences it may have been a nickname.
QUIRK Irish
Variant of QUIRKE.
RADCLIFF English
From various place names in England that mean "red cliff" in Old English.
RAINS English
Variant of RAINES.
RAKE English
Originally a name for a dweller on a narrow pass or hillside, from Old English hrace meaning "throat".
READ (1) English
Means "red" from Middle English read, probably denoting a person with red hair or complexion.
READY (1) English
From Middle English redi meaning "prepared, prompt".
READY (3) Irish
Anglicized form of Ó RODAGH.
REED English
Variant of READ (1).
RICE Welsh
Derived from the given name RHYS.
RIDER English
Variant of RYDER.
RIVERS English
Denoted a person who lived near a river, from Middle English, from Old French riviere meaning "river", from Latin riparius meaning "riverbank".
ROT German, Jewish
Variant of ROTH.
ROUNDS English
Patronymic derived from Middle English rond meaning "round, plump", ultimately from Latin rotundus.
ROWAN Irish
Anglicized form of Ó RUADHÁIN.