Browse Surnames

This is a list of surnames in which the usage is English; and the order is random.
usage
Peyton English
Variant of Payton.
Goode English
Variant of Good.
Bonney English
From northern Middle English boni meaning "pretty, attractive".
Underwood English
Means "dweller at the edge of the woods", from Old English under and wudu.
Gibson English, Scottish
Means "son of Gib".
Ness English, Scottish, Norwegian
From English ness and Norwegian nes meaning "headland, promontory", of Old Norse origin, originally referring to a person who lived there.
Shirley English
From an English place name, derived from Old English scir "bright" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Sims English
Variant of Simms.
Fishman English
Occupational name for a fisherman.
Arthurson English
Means "son of Arthur".
Granville English
Derived from a Norman place name Grainville.
Arnold English
Derived from the given name Arnold.
Strange English
Derived from Middle English strange meaning "foreign", ultimately from Latin extraneus.
Smith English
Means "metalworker, blacksmith" from Old English smiþ, related to smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world. A famous bearer was the Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).
Waters 1 English
Originally given to a person who lived near the water.
Bain English
Variant of Baines 2.
Earls English
Patronymic form of Earl.
Waters 2 English
Derived from the given name Walter.
Humphrey English
Derived from the given name Humphrey.
Hightower English
Possibly a variant of Hayter.
Atwood English
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the wood".
Nichols English
Derived from the given name Nichol.
Baxter English
Variant (in origin a feminine form) of Baker.
Penny English
Nickname meaning "penny, coin" from Old English penning.
Hopkins English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Hob.
Griffin 2 English
Nickname from the mythological beast with body of a lion with head and wings of an eagle. It is ultimately from Greek γρύψ (gryps).
Wilkerson English
Means "son of Wilkin".
Williams English
Means "son of William".
Moon 2 English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Moyon in Normandy.
Bardsley English
From the name a village near Manchester, from the Old English given name Beornræd and leah "woodland, clearing".
Graves English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
Stanford English
Derived from various English place names meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
Bowman English
Occupational name for an archer, derived from Middle English bowe, Old English boga meaning "bow".
Carman 1 English
Occupational name for a carter, from Middle English carre "cart" (of Latin origin) and man "man".
Rickard English
From the given name Richard.
Hardy English, French
From Old French and Middle English hardi meaning "bold, daring, hardy", of Germanic origin.
Walters English
Derived from the given name Walter.
Battle English
From a nickname for a combative person. In some cases it may come from the name of English places called Battle, so named because they were sites of battles.
Augustine English
From the given name Augustine 1.
Thornton English
From any of the various places in England by this name, meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
Hillam English
From English places by this name, derived from Old English hyll meaning "hill".
Donalds English
Derived from the given name Donald.
Leonard English
Derived from the given name Leonard.
Woodward English
Occupational name for a forester, meaning "ward of the wood" in Old English.
Winston English
Derived from the given name Wynnstan.
Alfredson English
Means "son of Alfred".
Horton English
From the names of various places in England, which are derived from Old English horh "dirt, mud" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Wilbur English
From the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English.
Ivers English, Irish
Patronymic derived from the given name Ivor.
Badcock English
From a diminutive of the medieval given name Bada.
Hailey English
Variant of Haley.
Law English
Derived from Old English hlaw "hill".
Ingham English
From the name of an English town, of Old English origin meaning "Inga's homestead".
Haynes English
Patronymic derived from the Norman name Hagano.
Eldridge English
Derived from the given name Aldric.
Emmet English
Variant of Emmett. This name was borne by the Irish nationalist Robert Emmet (1778-1803).
Todd English
Means "fox", derived from Middle English todde.
Younge English
Variant of Young.
Noel French, English
Either from the given name Noël, or else derived directly from Old French noel "Christmas" and given to a person who had a particular connection with the holiday.
Daniell English
Derived from the given name Daniel.
Austin English
Derived from the given name Austin.
Kendrick 1 English
From the Old English given names Cyneric or Cenric.
Allsopp English
From the name of the village of Alsop en la Dale in Derbyshire, England. It means "Ælli's valley" in Old English.
Clemens English
Derived from the given name Clement. This was the surname of the author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), also known as Mark Twain.
Nixon English
Means "son of Nick". A famous bearer was the American president Richard Nixon (1913-1994).
Case English
From Norman French casse meaning "box, case", ultimately from Latin capsa. This was an occupational name for a box maker.
Killam English
Denoted one who hailed from the English town of Kilham, meaning "kiln homestead".
Moses Jewish, English
Derived from the given name Moses.
Garland English
Means "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. It originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
Cornell English
Derived from the given name Cornelius.
Corey English
Derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning.
Gage French, English
Occupational name derived either from Old French jauge "measure" (a name for an assayer) or gage "pledge, payment" (a name for a moneylender). Both words were ultimately of Frankish origin.
Fiddler English
English form of Fiedler.
Bisset English
From Old French bis meaning "drab, dingy", a nickname for someone who looked drab.
Kay 1 English
Derived from the given name Kay 2.
Radcliff English
From various place names in England that mean "red cliff" in Old English.
Boon 2 English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Bohon, in Manche in France. The town's name is of unknown origin.
Merrill 2 English
From the name of various places in England, derived from Old English myrige "pleasant" and hyll "hill".
Dustin English
From the Old Norse given name Þórsteinn.
Jeffries English
Patronymic from the given name Jeffrey.
Combs English
Variant of Coombs.
Adamson English
Means "son of Adam".
Brownlow English
From Old English brun meaning "brown" and hlaw meaning "mound, small hill". The name was probably given to a family living on a small hill covered with bracken.
Putnam English
From Puttenham, the name of towns in Hertfordshire and Surrey in England, which mean "Putta's homestead".
Starr English
From Middle English sterre meaning "star". This was usually a nickname, but it could also occasionally be a sign name from the name of an inn called the Star.
Ross English, Scottish
From various place names (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), which are derived from Scottish Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland".
Coombs English
From Old English cumb meaning "valley", the name of several places in England.
Fortune English
From Middle English, ultimately from Latin fortuna meaning "fortune, luck, chance". This was possibly a nickname for a gambler.
Silver English
From a nickname for a person with grey hair, from Old English seolfor "silver".
Tyler English
Occupational name for a tiler of roofs, derived from Old English tigele "tile". A famous bearer of this name was American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
Ray English
Variant of Rey 1, Rey 2, Rye or Wray.
Lukeson English (Rare)
Means "son of Luke".
Joyner English
Variant of Joiner.
Willoughby English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English wilig "willow" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
Deering English
From the Old English given name Deora meaning "dear, beloved".
Tash English
From Middle English at asche meaning "at the ash tree".
Burns 1 English, Scottish
Derived from Old English burna "stream, spring". A famous bearer was the Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796).
Dwerryhouse English
Indicated a person who worked or lived at a dyehouse, which is a place where dyeing was done.
Eliot English
Variant of Elliott.
Patrick English
From the given name Patrick.
Tyson 2 English
Variant of Dyson.
Oakley English
From a place name meaning "oak clearing" in Old English. It was borne by American sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926).
Arrington English
From the name of a town in Cambridgeshire, originally meaning "Earna's settlement" in Old English (Earna being a person's nickname meaning "eagle").
Pierson English
Means "son of Piers".
Harvey English
From the Breton given name Haerviu (see Harvey).
Traviss English
English variant of Travers.
Thomas English, Welsh, French, German
Derived from the given name Thomas.
Norwood English
Originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
Greenwood English
Topographic name for someone who lived in or near a lush forest, from Old English grene "green" and wudu "wood".
Ainsworth English
Habitational name for a person from the village of Ainsworth near Manchester, itself from the Old English given name Ægen and worþ meaning "enclosure".
Acker German, English
Denoted a person who lived near a field, derived from Middle English aker or Middle High German acker meaning "field".
Dukes English
Patronymic form of Duke.
Morrison English
Means "son of Morris".
Lovel English
Variant of Lowell.
Wickham English
From any of various towns by this name in England, notably in Hampshire. They are derived from Old English wīc "village, town" (of Latin origin) and ham "home, settlement".
Alvin English
Variant of Elwyn.
Sudworth English
From an English place name composed of Old English suþ "south" and worþ "enclosure".
Lowell English
From a nickname derived from a Norman French lou meaning "wolf" and a diminutive suffix.
Joiner English
Occupational name for a carpenter (that is, a person who joins wood together to make furniture).
Roberts English
Means "son of Robert".
Winfield English
From various English place names, derived from Old English winn "meadow, pasture" and feld "field".
Huxley English
From the name of a town in Cheshire. The final element is Old English leah "woodland, clearing", while the first element might be hux "insult, scorn". A famous bearer was the British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963).
Evanson English
Means "son of Evan".
Rimmer English
Occupational name meaning "poet", from Middle English rime meaning "rhyme".
Bradford English
Derived from the name of the city of Bradford in West Yorkshire, which meant "broad ford" in Old English. This is also the name of other smaller towns in England.
Wolf German, English
From Middle High German or Middle English wolf meaning "wolf", or else from a Germanic given name beginning with this element.
Power 1 English, Irish
From Old French Poier, indicating a person who came from the town of Poix in Picardy, France.
Thorley English
From any of the various places in England called Thornley or Thorley, meaning "thorn clearing" in Old English.
Holt English, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
From Old English, Old Dutch and Old Norse holt meaning "forest".
Peters English, German, Dutch
Means "son of Peter".
Bagley English
From various English place names, all derived from Old English bagga "bag, badger" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
Garfield English
Means "triangle field" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president James A. Garfield (1831-1881).
Pitts English
Indicated a person who lived by a pit or hollow, from Old English pytt. It could also indicate a person from Pitt (Hants) or Pett (East Sussex) in England.
Woodham English
Indicated a person who had a home near a wood, derived from Old English wudu "wood" and ham "home, settlement".
Clay English
Means simply "clay", originally referring to a person who lived near or worked with of clay.
Statham English
From the name of a village in the English county of Cheshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place" and ham "home, settlement".
Pryor English
Originally belonged to one who was a prior (a religious official), or one who worked for a prior.
Toft English
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many places in Britain of that name, derived from Old Norse topt meaning "homestead".
Cullen 1 English
From the name of the German city of Cologne, which was derived from Latin colonia "colony".
Forester English
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see Forest).
Read 2 English
From Old English ryd, an unattested form of rod meaning "cleared land". It is also derived from various English place names with various meanings, including "roe headland", "reeds" and "brushwood".
Steffen Low German, English
Derived from the given name Stephen.
Josephs English
Derived from the given name Joseph.
Gorbold English
From the given name Gerbold.
Fear English
Derived from Middle English feare meaning "friend, comrade".
Wilson English
Means "son of Will". A famous bearer was the American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
Abrams Jewish, English
Means "son of Abraham".
Beaumont French, English
From French place names derived from beau "beautiful" and mont "mountain".
Marshall English
Derived from Middle English mareschal "marshal", ultimately from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant". It originally referred to someone who took care of horses.
Yoxall English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Yoxall in Staffordshire, itself derived from Old English geoc "oxen yoke" and halh "nook, recess".
Ellison English
Patronymic form of the English name Ellis, from the medieval given name Elis, a vernacular form of Elijah.
Jewel English
Variant of Jewell.
Christophers English
Derived from the given name Christopher.
Stainthorpe English
Originally indicated a person from Staindrop, County Durham, England, derived from Old English stæner meaning "stony ground" and hop meaning "valley".
Averill English
Derived from the feminine given name Eoforhild.
Eads English
Means "son of Eda 2" or "son of Adam".
Senior English
Originally a name for the elder of two brothers.
Fabian German, English, Polish
Derived from the given name Fabian.
Dixon English
Means "son of Dick 1".
Wheelock English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Wheelock, England. It was named for the nearby River Wheelock, which is derived from Welsh chwylog meaning "winding".
Albert English, French, Catalan, Hungarian, Romanian, German
Derived from the given name Albert.
Porcher English, French
Means "swineherd" from Old French and Middle English porchier, from Latin porcus "pig".
Lucas English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch
Derived from the given name Lucas. A famous bearer of this surname is George Lucas (1944-), the creator of the Star Wars movies.
Yong English
Variant of Young.
Darwin English
From the given name Deorwine.
Myles English
From the given name Miles.
Curtis English
Nickname for a courteous person, derived from Old French curteis meaning "refined, courtly".
Mathews English
Derived from the given name Matthew.
Blake English
Variant of Black. A famous bearer was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
Hicks English
Derived from the medieval given name Hicke, a diminutive of Richard.
Parker English
Means "keeper of the park" in Middle English. It is an occupational name for a person who was a gamekeeper at a medieval park.
Newport English
Given to one who came from the town of Newport (which means simply "new port"), which was the name of several English towns.
Hawthorne English
Denoted a person who lived near a hawthorn bush, a word derived from Old English hagaþorn, from haga meaning "haw berry" and þorn meaning "thorn bush". A famous bearer was the American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of The Scarlet Letter.
Parsons English
Originally denoted a son of a parson, a derivative of Latin persona "person".
Quincy English
Originally from various place names in Normandy that were derived from the given name Quintus.
Gates English
Originally denoted a person who lived near the town gates.
Knowles English
From Middle English knoll, Old English cnoll meaning "small hill, knoll". A famous bearer is American singer Beyoncé Knowles (1981-).
Dennis English
From the given name Dennis.
Deighton English
From English towns by this name, from Old English dic "ditch" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Edwards English
Means "son of Edward".
Fairclough English
From a place name meaning "fair ravine, fair cliff" in Old English.
Philips English, Dutch
Means "son of Philip". Famous bearers of this surname were Frederick Philips (1830-1900) and his son Gerard (1858-1942), the Dutch founders of the company Philips.
Darcy English
From Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting someone who came from the town of Arcy in La Manche, France. A notable fictional bearer is Fitzwilliam Darcy from Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice (1813).
Sharpe English
Variant of Sharp.
Payton English
From the name of the town of Peyton in Sussex. It means "Pæga's town".
Herbert English, German, French
Derived from the male given name Herbert.
Holmes English, Scottish
Variant of Holme. A famous fictional bearer was Sherlock Holmes, a detective in Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887.
Arthur English, French
From the given name Arthur.
Rayne English, French
Derived from a Germanic name that was short for longer names beginning with the element ragin meaning "advice, counsel".
Hanley English
From various English place names meaning "high meadow" in Old English.
Alvey English
Derived from the given name Ælfwig.
Virgo English
Possibly from Latin virgo "virgin, maiden". It may have been a nickname for an actor who played the Virgin Mary in mystery plays, or for a shy man or a lecher.
Reeve English
Occupational name derived from Middle English reeve, Old English (ge)refa meaning "sheriff, prefect, local official".
Addison English
Means "son of Addy 2".
Peel English
Nickname for a thin person, derived from Old French pel, Latin palus meaning "stake, post" (related to English pole).
Spooner English
Occupational name for a maker of spoons or a maker of shingles, derived from Middle English spone meaning "chip of wood, spoon".
Albinson English
Means "son of Albin".
Abel 1 English, French, Danish, Spanish, Portuguese
Derived from the given name Abel.
Ward 1 English
Derived from Old English weard meaning "guard, guardian".
Tobin English
From a diminutive of the given name Tobias.
Peck 1 English
Variant of Peak.
Albertson English
Means "son of Albert".
Stone English
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or worked with stone, derived from Old English stan.
Paget English, French
Diminutive of Page.
Harland English
From various place names meaning "hare land" in Old English.
Spencer English
Occupational name for a person who dispensed provisions to those who worked at a manor, derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry".
Stacy English
Derived from Stace, a medieval form of Eustace.
London English
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain.
Judd English
Derived from the medieval name Judd.
Mallory English
From Old French maloret meaning "unfortunate, unlucky", a term introduced to England by the Normans.
Crawford English
From a place name derived from Old English crawa "crow" and ford "river crossing".
Park 2 English
From Middle English park, from Latin parricus, of Germanic origin. This was a name for someone who worked in or lived in a park.
Bonham English
English form of Bonhomme.
Preston English
Originally derived from various place names meaning "priest town" in Old English.
Britton English
Originally given to a person who was a Briton (a Celt of England) or a Breton (an inhabitant of Brittany).
Lincoln English
Originally indicated that the bearer was from the English city of Lincoln, called Lindum Colonia by the Romans, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". A famous bearer was Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.
Thatcher English
Referred to a person who thatched roofs by attaching straw to them, derived from Old English þæc meaning "thatch".
Wilmer English
Derived from the given name Wilmǣr.
Crewe English
Originally denoted someone from Crewe in Cheshire, which is from Welsh criu "weir, dam, fish trap".
Adcock English
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Adam.
Willey English
Variant of Wiley.
Walter English, German
Derived from the given name Walter.
Evered English
From the given name Everard.
Moore 1 English
Originally indicated a person who lived on a moor, from Middle English mor meaning "open land, bog".
Terry English
Derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of Theodoric.
Burton English
From a common English place name, derived from Old English meaning "fortified town".
Earl English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl meaning "nobleman, warrior". It was either a nickname for one who acted like an earl, or an occupational name for a person employed by an earl.
Michael English, German
From the given name Michael.
Royce English
Originally derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of Rose.
Wood English, Scottish
Originally denoted one who lived in or worked in a forest, derived from Old English wudu "wood".
Westbrook English
From the name of places in England, derived from Old English west "west" and broc "brook, stream".
Hayward English
Occupational name for a person who protected an enclosed forest, from Old English hæg "enclosure, fence" and weard "guard".
Spearing English
Patronymic form of Spear.
Fairchild English
Means "beautiful child" in Middle English.
Denman English
From Middle English dene "valley" combined with man.
Nye English
Originally indicated a person who lived near a river, from Middle English atten eye meaning "at the river".
Selby English
From the name of a village that meant "willow farm" in Old English.
Burrell English
English form of Bureau.
Potter English
Occupational name for a potter, one who makes earthen vessels. This surname was used by J. K. Rowling for the hero in her Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.
Abramson English
Means "son of Abraham".
Sandford English
Indicated a person from Sandford, England, which means simply "sand ford".
Foster 2 English
Occupational name for a scissor maker, derived from Old French forcetier.
Davids English
Means "son of David".
Goffe English
Derived from Breton or Cornish goff meaning "smith", referring to a metalworker.
Brice English
From the given name Brice.
Seymour 1 English
From Saint Maur, a French place name, which commemorates Saint Maurus.
Chancellor English
Occupational name for an administrator, a chancellor, from Norman French chancelier.
Hewitt English
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Hugh.
Stringer English
Occupational name for a maker of string or bow strings, from Old English streng "string".
Bennett English
Derived from the medieval English given name Bennett.
Bennington English
From the English town name Benington, which can mean either "settlement belonging to Beonna's people" or "settlement by the River Beane".
George English
Derived from the given name George.
Scott English, Scottish
Originally given to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic.
Dale English
From Old English dæl meaning "valley", originally indicating a person who lived there.
Gibb English
Derived from the given name Gib.
Gully English
Nickname for a big person, from Middle English golias meaning "giant" (ultimately from Goliath, the Philistine warrior who was slain by David in the Old Testament).
Lawson English
Means "son of Laurence 1".
Montgomery English, Scottish
From a place name in Calvados, France meaning "Gumarich's mountain". A notable bearer was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
Nigel English
Derived from the given name Neil.
Minett English
From the medieval given name Minna.
Derby English
Variant of Darby.
Merrill 1 English
Derived from the given name Muriel.
Hobson English
Means "son of Hob".
Aiken English
From the medieval given name Atkin, a diminutive of Adam.
Constable English
From Old French conestable, ultimately from Latin comes stabuli meaning "officer of the stable".
Kemp English
Derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, warrior".
Bullard English
Possibly a nickname derived from Middle English bole "fraud, deceit".
Ansel English
Derived from the given name Anselm.