Frisian Submitted Surnames

Frisian names are used in Friesland in the northern Netherlands and in East and North Frisia in northwestern Germany. See also about Frisian Names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AARDEMA     Frisian
The surname Aardema is a patronymic from the personal name Aart, a local variant of Arend, + -ma, a Frisian suffix of origin.
ATEN     Frisian, Dutch
The Frisian name Aten means "Noble Wolf". The name was probably given to lesser lords. As noble would mean nobility. As wolf was always a symbol of a warrior, or hunter. Usually Nobles who were also warriors, were lesser lords... [more]
BAACK     North Frisian, Dutch
Either from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name Baldeke (a short form of any of the compound names with the first element bald ‘bold’, for example Baldewin) or from Middle Low German baec, bake ‘pork’, ‘bacon’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a butcher or pig farmer.
BEY     French, German, Frisian
North German and Frisian: from the Old Frisian personal name Beyo or Boy/Boye (see Boye).... [more]
BOUMA     Frisian
Origine is Friesland.... [more]
BOYE     English, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From a Germanic personal name, Boio or Bogo, of uncertain origin. It may represent a variant of Bothe, with the regular Low German loss of the dental between vowels, but a cognate name appears to have existed in Old English, where this feature does not occur... [more]
EPEMA     Frisian
"Son of Epa" or "Son of Eepa". The name was applied starting around 1620 C.E. to the descendants of Eepa, matriarch of a family of the "grytman" type of elected nobility who held political power in and around the town of Sneek/Snits... [more]
HARMENINCK     Frisian
Patronymic of Hermann.
HAY     English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
KOOISTRA     Frisian
occupational name for a decoy man, from an agent derivative of Middle Dutch kooye ‘decoy’.
NIEMANN     North Frisian
North German form of Neumann, from Middle Low German nie + man.
PAYSEN     German, Frisian
Patronymic from the personal name Pay, the Frisian form of Paul.
PAYSON     German, Frisian
German and Frisian variant spelling of Paysen, a patronymic from the personal name Paul.
POSTMA     Frisian
Frisian variant of the Dutch and North German surname Posthumus.
REDMER     Frisian
North German: from the Frisian personal name, composed of the Germanic elements rad ‘advice’, ‘counsel’ + mari, meri ‘fame’.
ROELOFSEMA     Frisian
Possibly meaning "son of Roelof". Variant of Roelofsma.
ROELOFSMA     Frisian
Possibly means "son of Roelof".
ROSEMA     Frisian
Variant spelling of Rozema.
ROZEMA     Frisian
Possibly a contraction of Roelfsema meaning "son of Roelf". Also spelled Rosema, Roosma, Rozeman.
SJOERDSMA     Frisian, Dutch
Derived from the Frisian given name Sjoerd combined with the Frisian surname suffix -(s)ma, which is most likely derived from Old Frisian monna meaning "men".... [more]
TABBERT     German, Frisian
From Middle Low German tabbert, Middle Dutch tabbaert ‘tabard’, a sleeveless overgarment worn by men in the Middle Ages, (ultimately from French tabard, from Late Latin tabardum)... [more]
TIESEMA     Frisian
It's a patronym and it means "son of Ties".
TURKSTRA     Frisian
TURKSTRA - Meaning: From the town of "Turkeye". Turkeye is a small town within Zeelandic Flanders in the western part of Netherlands. This family names was given to persons originating from the village.
WILKES     English, Frisian
English: patronymic from Wilk.... [more]
WYCKOFF     East Frisian (Modern, Rare, Archaic)
The North Germanic meaning is "settlement on a bay," as in the cognate Viking (Viking is derived from Old Norse vík "bay").
ZYLSTRA     Dutch, Frisian, English
Derived from Dutch zijl "canal" or "sluice". Originally indicated someone who lives near a canal or sluice.
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