Scottish Submitted Surnames

Scottish names are used in the country of Scotland as well as elsewhere in the Western World as a result of the Scottish diaspora. See also about Scottish names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABERCROMBIEScottish
Derived from a surname. It is the name of a parish in Fife, Scotland, on the northern shore of the Frith of Forth, whence the possessor took his surname; from Aber, marshy ground, a place where two or more streams meet; and cruime or crombie, a bend or crook... [more]
ABERNATHYScottish
A different form of Abernethy, which originally meant "person from Abernethy", Perth and Kinross ("confluence of the (river) Nethy"). This was one of the surnames of the Scots who settled in northern Ireland during the ‘plantation’ in the 17th century, and it was brought to the U.S. as the name of a Southern plantation owner.
ADIEEnglish, Scottish
From the personal name ADIE, a medieval pet form of ADAM.
AFFLECKGalician, Scottish
Variation of Auchinleck, a town near Dundee, Scotland... Ben & Casey Affleck are famous bearers of the name. Auchinleck appears to have been one of those places where the ancient Celts and Druids held conventions, celebrated their festivals, and performed acts of worship... [more]
AGNEWScottish
Scottish (of Norman origin): habitational name from Agneaux in Manche, France.... [more]
AIKMANDutch, English, Scottish
Originally a surname or a nickname meaning oak man.
AKINSScottish, English, Northern Irish
Variant of Aikens, which is derived from the given name Aiken, a variant of the medieval diminutive Atkin (see Aitken).
ALAN CROMScottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
ALARDYCEScottish
Scottish regional surname meaning "southern cliff". From the Gaelic all 'cliff' and deas 'southern'.
ALBANYScottish, English (American)
From the title of the Dukes of Albany (House of Stuart), hence a name borne by their retainers. It is an infrequent surname in England and Scotland. The city of Albany, NY (formerly the Dutch settlement of Beverwijck or Fort Orange) was named for James Stuart, Duke of York and Albany; he was the brother of King Charles II and later king in his own right as James II... [more]
ALBEEScottish
Means either "son of the blond one" or "son of Alpin".
ALFORDEnglish, Scottish
Habitation name found in Lincolnshire, Surrey and Somerset, England and Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The name can be derived by combining the Old English female personal name Ealdg- and -ford meaning "water crossing" or can mean "from the alder tree ford".
ALLANEScottish (Rare)
Variant of Allan
ALLISONEnglish, Scottish
Patronymic from a Middle English male personal name, most likely ALLEN, but other possibilities include ELLIS or of a short form of ALEXANDER. ... [more]
AM MAGH FADAScottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous former burgh.
ANDERSGerman, Scottish, Czech
Derived from the given name Anders.
ANDERSONScottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Ghille Andrais meaning 'Son of the devotee of St. Andrew'. ... [more]
ÀNSRUTHAIRScottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous town.
APPLEGARTHEnglish, Scottish
Topographic name from northern Middle English applegarth meaning "apple orchard" (Old Norse apaldr meaning "apple tree" + gar{dh}r meaning "enclosure"), or a habitational name from a place so named, of which there are examples in Cumbria and North and East Yorkshire, as well as in the county of Dumfries.
ARDScottish
Habitational name from any of several places called Aird, including one near Hurlford in Ayrshire, another near Stranraer in Galloway, and the Aird, the higher part of the Vale of Beauly, near Inverness... [more]
ARDISScottish
Reduced form of Allardice.
ARGYLEScottish
Means "person from Argyll", a region of south-western Scotland ("coastland of the Gaels").
ARMOURScottish, Northern Irish
From Middle English, Old French armure, blended with the agent noun armer (see Armer), hence an occupational name for a maker of arms and armor. The collective noun armure denoted offensive weapons as well as the more recently specialized sense of protective gear.
AUCHINLECKScottish (Rare)
Scottish Gaelic: Achadh nan Leac... [more]
AYDENEnglish, Scottish, Turkish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic caol meaning "narrows, channel, strait".
BAILE PHÙIRScottish Gaelic
Proper, non-Anglicized form of Balfour.
BAINScottish, French, English
Nickname for a hospitable person from northern Middle English beyn, bayn meaning "welcoming", "friendly".... [more]
BALDYScottish, Northern Irish
From the personal name Baldy or Baldie, a pet form of Archibald.
BALFOURScottish
Originating from several place names in Scotland. Derived from the Scottish Gaelic meaning "village pasture".
BANNIONScottish
Scottish/Irish
BARRScottish, Northern Irish
Habitational name from any of various places in southwestern Scotland, in particular Ayrshire and Renfrewshire, named with Gaelic barr "height, hill" or a British cognate of this.
BATEMANEnglish, Scottish
Occupational name meaning ‘servant of Bate.’
BATHGATEScottish, English
From the town of Bathgate, west of Edinburgh, Scotland. The town's name derives from Cumbric *beith, meaning 'boar' (Welsh baedd) and *gaith. meaning 'wood' (Welsh coed).
BAYScottish
Reduced form of McBeth.
BERNETTScottish, English
Altered spelling of Scottish and English Burnett or French Bernet.
BILSLANDScottish
From a place near Kilmaurs in East Ayrshire, Scotland. Allegedly a combination of BIL and land "farm, land, property".
BIRNIEScottish
Part of the clan MacInnes from the Scottish highlands. It was originally the name of a church (Burn-nigh) which became Birnie or Birney.
BLACKERBYEnglish, Irish, Scottish
English surname of unexplained origin, probably from the name of a lost or unidentified place.
BLAIKLOCKScottish (Anglicized, Modern, Rare)
Allegerdly from Blacklock which supposedly described the colour of someone's hair.
BLAINScottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name BLÁÁN, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of BLIN. It could also be a nickname for a person suffering from boils, from Middle English blain "blister"
BLAINEScottish
Derived from the given name BLÁÁN.
BOGLEScottish, Northern Irish
From a medieval Scottish and Northern Irish nickname for someone of scary appearance (from Middle Scots bogill "hobgoblin").
BOLDYScottish
This is a name for someone who lived in Peeblesshire.
BONARScottish, Northern Irish
From a medieval nickname for a courteous or good-looking person (from Middle English boner "gentle, courteous, handsome"). A notable bearer of the surname was Canadian-born British Conservative politician Andrew Bonar Law (1858-1923), prime minister 1922-23.
BOTHWELLScottish
Also N Irish... [more]
BOWEREnglish, Scottish
Scottish: occupational name for a bow maker, Older Scots bowar, equivalent to English Bowyer. ... [more]
BOWIEScottish Gaelic
Scots Gaelic Bhuidhe or Buidhe meaning "golden yellow". Name was originally Mac Gille Bhuid, meaning "son of the yellow-haired lad". It was shortened to MacilBuie and MacilBowie in the 1600's, and further shortened in the 1700's to Buie and anglicised to Bowie by English speaking census takers and record keepers on the Scottish mainland.
BOYDSTONScottish
Habitational name from a place called Boydston near Glasgow. This surname is no longer found in the British Isles.
BRAINScottish Gaelic (Anglicized), Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mac an Bhreitheamhan ‘son of the judge’, from breitheamh ‘judge’.
BRATTENScottish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac an Bhreatnaich ‘son of the Briton’, originally denoting a Strathclyde Welsh-speaking Briton. It was applied in Ireland also to people from Brittany.
BRIDEIrish, Scottish, English
Further Anglicized from Scottish/Irish MacBride, from the root for Brigid.
BRIDGESEnglish, Scottish
Plural of "Bridge"; dweller at the bridge.
BROWNLEEScottish, Scottish Gaelic, Northern Irish, English
"Brown field" in Old English.
BROWNLEYEnglish, Scottish
Variant spelling of "Brownlee". Brown field in Old English.
BYERSScottish, English
Scottish and northern English topographic name for someone who lived by a cattleshed, Middle English byre, or a habitational name with the same meaning, from any of several places named with Old English b¯re, for example Byers Green in County Durham or Byres near Edinburgh.
CAIRNSScottish
From Gaelic carn "cairn", a topographic name for someone who lived by a cairn, i.e. a pile of stones raised as a boundary marker or a memorial.
CALLANDERScottish, English, Swedish (Rare)
Habitational name from various places so named in Scotland. ... [more]
CALLENDERScottish
Variant of Scottish CALLANDER or German KALANDER.
CAMMONScottish, Irish
Reduced form of McCammon.
CANNINGEnglish, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname CANA and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
CARGILLScottish, English
Habitational name from a place so named in Scotland.
CARLINIrish (Anglicized), Scottish, French, Swedish, Italian, Jewish (Anglicized), German
Irish (now also common in Scotland) anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cairealláin, an Ulster family name, also sometimes Anglicized as Carlton, meaning ‘descendant of Caireallán’, a diminutive of the personal name Caireall... [more]
CARMICHAELScottish, English
Scottish place name meaning "fort of Michael".
CARNEGIEScottish
Habitational name from a place called Carnegie, near Carmyllie in Angus, from Gaelic cathair an eige "fort at the gap".
CARRICKScottish
The possible roots of the Carrick family name may be from the ancient Strathclyde people of the the Scottish/English Borderlands. Carrick may also be of local origin, referring to those who lived in or near the place called Carrick in Ayrshire... [more]
CARRINGTONEnglish, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Carrington, probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Cara + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’.... [more]
CARRUTHERSScottish
This old Scottish surname was first used by Strathclyde-Briton people. The Carruthers family in the land of Carruthers in the parish of Middlebie, Dumfriesshire. In that are it is pronounced 'Cridders'.... [more]
CARUTHERSScottish
Means "Rhydderch's fort" in Cumbric. This might refer to the king of Alt Clut, Rhydderch Hael.
CASSEYScottish, Irish
This surname originated around ancient Scotland and Ireland. In its Gaelic form it is called, 'O Cathasaigh', which means 'the watchful one'.... [more]
CATHCARTScottish
Habitational name from Cathcart near Glasgow.
CHALMERSScottish
Variant of Chambers. The -l- was originally an orthographic device to indicate the length of the vowel after assimilation of -mb- to -m(m)-.
CINNAMONDScottish, Irish, English
Possibly originates from Scottish place name Kininmonth. Probably introduced to Northern Ireland by Scottish settlers where it remains in Ulster. Another origin is the French place name Saint Amand originated from French Huguenots settling in Ireland.
CLELANDBelgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
CLERIHEWScottish
A Scottish surname of unknown origin and meaning. A clerihew is a humorous or satirical verse consisting of two rhyming couplets in lines of irregular metre about someone who is named in the poem. It was invented by the British author Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956; Clerihew was his mother's maiden name)... [more]
CLYDEScottish
A river in the south-west of Scotland, running through Inverclyde, Ayrshire, Dunbartonshire, Lanarkshire, and the city of Glasgow. The second longest in Scotland; and the eighth longest in the United Kingdom... [more]
COBAINScottish
This unusual surname is of Old Norse origin and is found particularly in Scotland. It derives from an Old Norse personal name Kobbi, itself from an element meaning large, and the Gaelic bain, denoting a fair person, with the diminutive ('little' or 'son of') form Cobbie.
COCHRANEScottish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish
Derived from the 'Lowlands of Cochrane' near Paisley, in Renfrewshire, Scotland. Origin is uncertain, the theory it may have derived from the Welsh coch meaning "red" is dismissed because of the historical spelling of the name Coueran.... [more]
COLDENEnglish, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Colden, from Old English cald ‘cold’ col ‘charcoal’ + denu ‘valley’.... [more]
COLESEnglish, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
CONWAYWelsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
CORBETTEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
CORMICANScottish
From a pet form of the Gaelic personal name Cormac (see McCormick).
CORNWALLISScottish
Example: Lord Charles Cornwallis.
CORRIEScottish
Scottish spelling of MCCORRY.
COWANScottish (Anglicized), Northern Irish (Anglicized)
This surname, widespread in Scotland and Ulster, is an Anglicized form of the old Gaelic MacEoghain or MacEoin. The Gaelic prefix "mac" means "son of", plus the personal name Eoghan from the old Celtic "Oue(i)n", well-born, but believed to derive ultimately from the Greek "Eugenious", "born lucky" or "well-born"... [more]
COWENScottish, English (British)
Scottish and northern English: variant spelling of Cowan.
COWIEScottish
habitational name from any of several places, especially one near Stirling, named Cowie, probably from Gaelic colldha, an adjective from coll ‘hazel’
CRABBEnglish, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
CRAGGScottish, Irish, English
Variant of Craig, from Middle English Crag.
CRANDALLScottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Raonuill "son of RAONULL".
CRANSTONScottish
Combination of the Old English byname Cran "crane" and Old English tun "settlement".
CRAWEnglish, Scottish, Northern Irish
One who had characteristics of a crow; sometimes used as an element of a place name e.g. Crawford, and Crawfordjohn in Lanarkshire, Crawshawbooth in Lancashire, and Crawley in Sussex
CREELScottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Modern)
Fish Basket. The word Creel relates to Crille in Gaelic meaning weave.
CROCKETTEnglish, Scottish
Nickname for someone who affected a particular hairstyle, from Middle English croket ''large curl'' (Old Norman French croquet, a diminutive of croque "curl", "hook").
CROCKETTScottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Riocaird "son of RICHARD".
CROOKScottish, English
Possible origin a medieval topographical surname, denoting residence from the Middle English word "crok" from the Old NOrse "Krokr". Possibly a maker or seller of hooks. Another possibility is meaning crooked or bent originally used of someone with a hunch back.
CROYScottish
Means "person from Croy", the name of various places in Scotland.
CRUIKSHANKScottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for someone with a crooked leg (from Scots cruik "bent" + shank "leg"). This was the surname of British caricaturist George Cruikshank (1792-1872) and British actor Andrew Cruikshank (1907-1988).
CULBERTAnglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
CULBERTSONEnglish, Scottish, Northern Irish
Patronymic from Culbert.
CUMMINGIrish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
CURRIEScottish, Irish
Irish: Habitational name from Currie in Midlothian, first recorded in this form in 1230. It is derived from Gaelic curraigh, dative case of currach ‘wet plain’, ‘marsh’. It is also a habitational name from Corrie in Dumfriesshire (see Corrie).... [more]
CURRYScottish, English
Scottish and northern English: variant of Currie.
CURTINIrish (Anglicized), Scottish (Anglicized), English
Irish and Scottish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cruitín ‘son of Cruitín’, a byname for a hunchback (see McCurtain). ... [more]
CUTHBERTSONEnglish, Scottish
Patronymic surname from the personal name Cuthbert.
DALAISScottish Gaelic
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous village.
DALGLEISHScottish
Means "person from Dalgleish", near Selkirk ("green field").
DALGLIESHScottish
Scottish habitational name from a place near Selkirk, first recorded in 1383 in the form Dalglas, from Celtic dol- ‘field’ + glas ‘green.’
DALHOUSIEScottish
Meant "person from Dalhousie", near Edinburgh (perhaps "field of slander").
DALZIELScottish
Means "person from Dalyell", in the Clyde valley (probably "white field"). The name is standardly pronounced "dee-el". A fictional bearer is Detective Superintendent Andrew Dalziel, one half of the detective team of 'Dalziel and Pascoe' in the novels (1970-2009) of Reginald Hill.
DAMONEnglish, Scottish
From the personal name Damon, from a classical Greek name, a derivative of damān "to kill". Compare Damian.
DARLINGLiterature, English, Scottish
English and Scottish: from Middle English derling, Old English deorling ‘darling’, ‘beloved one’, a derivative of deor ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ (see Dear). This was quite a common Old English byname, which remained current as a personal name into the 14th century... [more]
DAWEnglish, Scottish
English and Scottish from a pet form of David. ... [more]
DAYEIrish, Scottish
Comes from Irish Ó Déa (m) or Ní Dhéa (f) ... [more]
DEEWelsh, Irish, English, Scottish, Chinese (Latinized)
Welsh: nickname for a swarthy person, from Welsh du ‘dark’, ‘black’. ... [more]
DOAKScots
A Scots Gaelic name said to be either an Anglicized version of Dabhóc that is a pet form of the given name David or a pet form of the given name Caradoc.
DOBSONEnglish, Scottish
Patronymic from the personal name Dobbe. This is also established in Ireland, notably County Leitrim.
DOCHERTYScottish
Scottish spelling of the Irish surname Doherty.
DODIEScottish (Modern)
Dodie is a Scottish shortening of the name "Dorothy" it is quite rare and one of the only famous people with this name is the singer/songwrite Dodie Clark.
DOLLARScottish, English (American)
Scottish: habitational name from Dollar in Clackmannanshire.... [more]
DOMINIEScottish
Occupational name for a church schoolmaster, from Latin domine, a vocative form of dominus, "lord" "master".
DONScottish
Don derives from the Old Gaelic "donn", brown, or the Old English pre 7th Century "dunn", brown, or the Old English pre 7th Century "dunn", dull brown or dark, and was originally given as a distinguishing nickname to someone with dark hair or a swarthy complexion.
DONHAMScottish
A surname meaning "House on the Hill" .
DOSSATEnglish, Scottish
Possibly from French origins (used predominantly in Louisiana in the United States).
DOWScottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DRUIMEANACHScottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Drummond.
DRUMScottish
Habitational name from a place and castle in Aberdeenshire named from Gaelic druim "ridge".
DRUMMONDSScottish
Variant of Scottish Drummond.
DRYDENAnglo-Saxon, Scottish
This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a Scottish locational name from a place thus called, near Roslin, in Midlothian. The derivation of the placename is from the Olde English pre 7th Century "dryge", dry, with "denu", valley; hence "dry valley".
DUGGANScottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
DUGUIDScottish
Probably "do good", from a Scottish nickname for a well-intentioned person or (ironically) a do-gooder.
DUNDASScottish, Northern Irish
Scottish and northern Irish (Counties Leitrim and Fermanagh): habitational name from Dundas, a place near Edinburgh, Scotland, which is named from Gaelic dùn ‘hill’ + deas ‘south’.
DUNNEIrish, English, Scottish
This surname means dark and was likely given to those with a dark complexion or with dark hair.
DURWARDEnglish, Scottish (?)
Means "guardian of the door, door-keeper" (cf. Durward). A fictional bearer of the surname is Quentin Durward, eponymous hero of the novel (1823) by Sir Walter Scott.
EDMINSTEIREScottish
john edminsteire was a person captured at the battle of dunbar in 1651 and shipped to boston in 1652 on the ship john and sarah. we can find no previous record of the edminsteire name. conjecture from f.custer edminster that did the geneology is it is a combination of french and german names and originated from people that migrated to scotland with mary queen of scots about 100 years earlier.
EDMISTONScottish
Habitational name from Edmonstone, near Edinburgh, so named from the Old English personal name Ēadmund + tūn meaning "settlement".
EMBRYEnglish, Scottish
ember, smoldering fire
ESPLINScottish
Scottish variant of Asplin. This was borne by the English stained glass artist and muralist Mabel Esplin (1874-1921).
FAIRWEATHEREnglish, Scottish
Nickname for a person with a sunny temperament.
FALLENScottish, Northern Irish
Variant spelling of Irish Fallon.
FARISHScottish
"Farish" derives from "Fari" meaning "Farrier".This unravells to many decades ago when people forged shoes for horses,people who were extremly skilled blacksmiths and named "farrier".This group of "farriers" named "Farish" lived in the highlands of the cool misty moors of scotland-the mighty country,who unleashed highly educated citizens who dispersed all over britain.
FARQUHARScottish (Anglicized)
Scottish (Aberdeenshire) reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Fhearchair ‘son of Fearchar’, a personal name composed of the elements fear ‘man’ + car ‘loving’, ‘beloved’.
FERRIERScottish
Scottish: occupational name for a smith, one who shoed horses, Middle English and Old French ferrier, from medieval Latin ferrarius, from ferrus ‘horseshoe’, from Latin ferrum ‘iron’. Compare FARRAR.
FIELDEnglish, Scottish, Irish, Jewish (Anglicized)
English: topographic name for someone who lived on land which had been cleared of forest, but not brought into cultivation, from Old English feld ‘pasture’, ‘open country’, as opposed on the one hand to æcer ‘cultivated soil’, ‘enclosed land’ (see Acker) and on the other to weald ‘wooded land’, ‘forest’ (see Wald)... [more]
FINLAYSONScottish
Patronymic from Finlay.
FIRTHEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
English and Scottish: topographic name from Old English (ge)fyrhþe ‘woodland’ or ‘scrubland on the edge of a forest’.... [more]
FITCHScottish
The name fitch is of anglo-saxon decent, it refers to a person of iron point inrefrence to a soldier or worrior it is derived from an english word (Fiche) which means iron point the name started in county suffolk
FLETTScottish
Probably originating in Orkney and Shetland, from a place in the parish of Delting, Shetland, named with an Old Norse term 'flotr' denoting a strip of arable land or pasture. Also possibly derived from the Old Norse byname Fljótr ‘swift’, ‘speedy’... [more]
FORBESIrish, Scottish
Comes from a Scottish place meaning "field" in Gaelic. It can also be used as a first name.... [more]
FORGIEScottish
Possibly a variant of Fergie or a shortened form of Ferguson. It could also be a habitational name from a place so named in Scotland.
FORSYTHEScottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic personal name Fearsithe, composed of the elements fear ‘man’ + sith ‘peace’. Some early forms with prepositions, as for example William de Fersith (Edinburgh 1365), seem to point to an alternative origin as a habitational name, but no place name of suitable form is known... [more]
FORTUNEScottish
Originally meant "person from Fortune", Lothian ("enclosure where pigs are kept").
GALBRAITHScottish, Scottish Gaelic
Ethnic name for someone descended from a tribe of Britons living in Scotland, from Gaelic gall ‘stranger’ + Breathnach ‘Briton’ (i.e. ‘British foreigner’). These were either survivors of the British peoples who lived in Scotland before the Gaelic invasions from Ireland in the 5th century (in particular the Welsh-speaking Strathclyde Britons, who survived as a distinctive ethnic group until about the 14th century), or others who had perhaps migrated northwestwards at the time of the Anglo-Saxon invasions.
GALLScottish, Irish, English
Nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning "foreigner" or "stranger". In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century... [more]
GALLOWAYScottish
Scottish: regional name from Galloway in southwestern Scotland, named as ‘place of the foreign Gaels’, from Gaelic gall ‘foreigner’ + Gaidheal ‘Gael’. From the 8th century or before it was a province of Anglian Northumbria... [more]
GAULScottish (Latinized, Rare), Irish, German
Scottish and Irish: variant of Gall ... [more]
GAVINScottish, English
From the given name Gavin.
GEDDESScottish, Irish
There is a place of this name in Nairn, but the name is more likely to be a patronymic from Geddie.
GEEIrish, Scottish, English, French
Irish and Scottish: reduced form of McGee, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodha ‘son of Aodh’ (see McCoy). ... [more]
GILKESONEnglish, Scottish
From the Scottish Gilchristson(son of Gilchrist) meaning "son of the servant/devotee of Christ"
GILLESPIEScottish, Irish
Gillespie can be of Scottish and Irish origin. The literal meaning is "servant of bishop", but it is a forename rather than a status name. The Irish Gillespies, originally MacGiollaEaspuig, are said to to be called after one Easpog Eoghan, or Bishop Owen, of Ardstraw, County Tyrone... [more]
GILLIESScottish
Scottish variant of Gillis or McGillis.
GILLISScottish
Scottish reduced form of Gaelic Mac Gille Iosa ‘son of the servant of Jesus’. Compare McLeish. The usual spelling in Scotland is Gillies.
GILROYScottish Gaelic, Irish, Scottish
"Red servant" in Gaelic.
GLADSTONEScottish
Habitational name from a place near Biggar in Lanarkshire, apparently named from Old English gleoda meaning "kite" + stān meaning "stone".
GLASSIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of the epithet glas "gray, green, blue" or any of various Gaelic surnames derived from it.
GLENDENNINGScottish
Habitational name from a place in the parish of Westerkirk, Dumfries, recorded in 1384 as Glendonwyne. It is probably named from Welsh glyn meaning "valley" + din meaning "fort" + gwyn meaning "fair", "white".
GOWScottish
Occupational name from Gaelic gobha "smith".
GRADENScottish
Habitational name from the lands of Graden in Berwickshire.
GRANTEnglish, Scottish
From a medieval personal name, probably a survival into Middle English of the Old English byname Granta (see Grantham).
GRASSScottish
Occupational name, reduced from Gaelic greusaiche "shoemaker". A certain John Grasse alias Cordonar (Middle English cordewaner "shoemaker") is recorded in Scotland in 1539.
GRAYSONScottish, Irish
Means "son of Gray".
GUNNScottish
This ancient Scottish surname is of Norweigan origin derived from the Old Norse personal name Gunnr. This surname, in most cases originated in Caithness, Scotland's most northerly county.
GUTHRIEScottish, Irish, German
Scottish: habitational name from a place near Forfar, named in Gaelic with gaothair ‘windy place’ (a derivative of gaoth ‘wind’) + the locative suffix -ach. Possibly an Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mag Uchtre ‘son of Uchtre’, a personal name of uncertain origin, perhaps akin to uchtlach ‘child’.... [more]
GYLESPIEScottish
Variant of Gillespie
HACKNEYEnglish, Scottish
Habitational name from Hackney in Greater London, named from an Old English personal name Haca (genitive Hacan) combined with ēg "island, dry ground in marshland".
HACKNEYEnglish, Scottish
From Middle English hakenei (Old French haquenée), an ambling horse, especially one considered suitable for women to ride; perhaps therefore a metonymic occupational name for a stablehand... [more]
HAILESScottish, English
Scottish habitational name from Hailes in Lothian, originally in East Lothian, named from the Middle English genitive or plural form of hall ‘hall’. ... [more]
HAINEYScottish Gaelic, Irish, Scottish, English
(Celtic) A lost me devil village in Scotland; or one who came from Hanney island in Berkshire.
HALIBURTONScottish
Means "town fortified in stone". It comes from a combination of the Old Norse element hallr meaning rock (as in Halle) and of the Old English place name Burton, denoting a fortified town... [more]
HAMEnglish, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
HAMESEnglish, Welsh, Scottish
Son of "Amy", in Old English. An ancient Leicestershire surname.
HAMILLScottish
Habitational name from Haineville or Henneville in Manche, France, named from the Germanic personal name Hagano + Old French ville "settlement".
HANLINScottish, English
Scottish and English: probably a variant spelling of Irish Hanlon.
HARCUSScottish
Orcadian form of Harcase, a habitational name originating from Berwickshire, Scotland.
HARKNESSScottish, English (British), Northern Irish
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place (perhaps in the area of Annandale, with which the surname is connected in early records), probably so called from the Old English personal name Hereca (a derivative of the various compound names with the first element here ‘army’) + Old English næss ‘headland’, ‘cape’... [more]
HARROLDScottish, English
Scottish and English variant spelling of Harold.
HARTLEYEnglish, Scottish
Derived from the Old English words meaning heorot meaning "hart" and leah meaning "clearing". Also from Scottish Ó hArtghaile meaning "descendant of Artghal". Hartley is also an English given name.
HARWOODEnglish, Scots
Habitation name found especially along the border areas of England and Scotland, from the Old English elements har meaning "gray" or hara referring to the animals called "hares" plus wudu for "wood"... [more]
HAWTHORNEnglish, Scottish
English and Scottish: variant spelling of Hawthorne.
HAWTHORNEEnglish, Scottish
English and Scottish: topographic name for someone who lived by a bush or hedge of hawthorn (Old English haguþorn, hægþorn, i.e. thorn used for making hedges and enclosures, Old English haga, (ge)hæg), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, such as Hawthorn in County Durham... [more]
HAYEnglish, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
HAYMESWelsh, Scottish, English, Irish, Anglo-Saxon
Variant of 'Hayes', 'Haynes' or 'Hames'... [more]
HENDRENScottish
Variant spelling of Hendron.
HIDDLESTONEnglish, Scottish
Habitational name from a place called Huddleston in Yorkshire, England. The place name was derived from the Old English personal name HUDEL.
HINDEnglish, Scottish
English (central and northern): nickname for a gentle or timid person, from Middle English, Old English hind ‘female deer’.... [more]
HOLLIDAYScottish
An ancient Scottish name that was first used by the Strathclyde-Briton people of the Scottish/English Borderlands. It is a name for someone who lived near the mountain called Holy Day in the country of Annandale.
HOMEEnglish, Scottish
English and Scottish variant spelling of Holme.
HOODEnglish, Scottish, Irish
English and Scottish: metonymic occupational name for a maker of hoods or a nickname for someone who wore a distinctive hood, from Middle English hod(de), hood, hud ‘hood’. Some early examples with prepositions seem to be topographic names, referring to a place where there was a hood-shaped hill or a natural shelter or overhang, providing protection from the elements... [more]
HOWIEScottish
I believe it is from "The Land of How" in Ayrshire
HUSTONScottish
Scottish variant spelling of Houston.
HUTCHERSONScottish
"Variant of Hutchison; patronymic from the medieval personal name Hutche, a variant of Hugh"
HUTCHISONScottish
Patronymic from the medieval personal name Hutche, a variant of Hugh.
HUTTONEnglish, Scottish
Scottish and northern English habitational name from any of the numerous places so called from Old English hoh ‘ridge’, ‘spur’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
HYLANScottish, English
Variation of the surname Hyland.
HYSLOPScottish
Habitational name from an unidentified place in northern England, perhaps so called from Old English hæsel (or the Old Norse equivalent hesli) ‘hazel’ + hop ‘enclosed valley’.
INVERARITYScottish
Means "person from Inverarity", Angus ("mouth of the Arity", perhaps a Celtic river-name meaning literally "slow").
IRELANDEnglish, Scottish
Ethnic name for someone from Ireland, Old English Iraland. The country gets its name from the genitive case of Old English Iras "Irishmen" and land "land". The stem Ir- is taken from the Celtic name for Ireland, Èriu, earlier Everiu... [more]
JIMERSONEnglish (British), Scottish
Variant of Scottish and northern English Jameson, based on a pet form of the personal name.
KAYLORScottish, German
Variant of Scottish Keillor.... [more]
KEGOScottish
Scottish - Eaglesham, Renfrewshire Scotland
KEILLORScottish
Habitational name from a place in Angus called Keilor.
KELSOScottish
Habitational name from Kelso on the river Tweed in Roxburghshire, perhaps so named from Old English cealc "chalk" + hoh "ridge", "spur".
KELTONScottish
Scottish habitational name from the village of Kelton in the parish of the same name in Kirkcudbrightshire.
KELTYScottish
From the name of a village in Fife, Scotland, which was derived from Scottish Gaelic coillte "wooded area, grove".
KENNYEnglish, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coinnigh "descendant of Coinneach" or Ó Cionaodha "descendant of Cionaodh".
KENTIEScottish, English, Dutch
Origin and meaning unknown. The name Kentie was spread in the Netherlands when a Scottish soldier, Alexander Kenti, settled at Woudrichem, the Netherlands around 1650. Alexander Kenti was born and raised in the Scottish highlands... [more]
KEOUGHIrish, Scottish
Anglicized, reduced form of Mac Eochaidh meaning "son of Eochaidh".
KILBRIDEIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Bhrighde "son of the devotee of Saint Brigid" (cf. MACBRIDE). Many of Saint Brigid's attributes became attached to the historical figure of St. Brigit of Kildare, Ireland, thus the spelling.
KILGOREScottish
Habitational name for someone from Kilgour in Fife, named with the Gaelic coille "wood" and gobhar, gabhar "goat".
KILPATRICKIrish, Scottish
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Phádraig "son of the servant of (Saint) Patrick"... [more]
KINCAIDScottish
Scottish habitational name from a place near Lennoxtown, north of Glasgow, which is first recorded in 1238 as Kincaith and in 1250 as Kincathe. The former spelling suggests derivation from Gaelic ceann ‘head’, ‘top’ + càithe ‘pass’, whereas the latter would point to cadha ‘quagmire’ as the second element.
KINKADEScottish
Habitation name, from the lands of Kincaid in Scotland.
KINNEYScottish
Reduced form of McKinney.
KIPPENBERGERGerman, French, Scottish
Mainly means "Shepard".
KIRKEnglish, Northern English, Scottish, Danish
From northern Middle English, Danish kirk "church" (Old Norse kirkja), a topographic name for someone who lived near a church.
KIRKLANDEnglish, Scottish
Derived from the Scottish 'kirk', meaning church, and land. This name denoted one who lived near or tended to the land belonging to or surrounding a church. A famous /fictional/ bearer is Arthur Kirkland, a main character in the highly popular anime/webmanga Axis Powers Hetalia... [more]
KIRKPATRICKEnglish, Scottish, Northern Irish
Habitational name from various places so called from the dedication of their church to St. Patrick. See KIRK.
KITSONScottish, English
Patronymic form of KIT.
KNOXEnglish (Modern), Scottish, Northern Irish
Topographic name derived from Old English cnocc "round hill" referring to someone living on or near a hill top.
KYLEScottish
Scottish and northern Irish regional name from a district in Ayrshire called Kyle, named for the British chieftains who ruled it in the 5th century, the Coel Hen. Also, habitational name from any of the numerous Scottish places named Kyle from Gaelic caol ‘narrow’, also caolas ‘narrows’, ‘strait’ - similar to Kyles
LAINGScottish
Scottish form of LANG. A famous bearer was the explorer Alexander Gordon Laing.
LAIRDScottish, Northern Irish
Scottish and northern Irish: status name for a landlord, from northern Middle English laverd ‘lord’.
LAMONDScottish
Scottish classical pianist and composer; Henry George Lamond has this surname. It means lawyer.
LAMONTScottish (Modern), Northern Irish, French
Scottish and northern Irish: from the medieval personal name Lagman, which is from Old Norse Logmaðr, composed of log, plural of lag ‘law’ (from leggja ‘to lay down’) + maðr, ‘man’ (genitive manns).... [more]
LAPSLEYScottish, English, Medieval English
Combination of Old English læppa ”end of a parish” and leah ”woodland clearing”. Another meaning could be possible.
LAUDERScottish, Northern Irish
From a village in Berwickshire in the Scottish Borders. It derives from the Celtic Lauuedder, probably indicating a rapidly flowing river, cognate with Modern Welsh llifer meaning 'to gush'.
LAWLERIrish, Scottish
This Irish surname is of Gaelic language origin. The surname derives from the original Gaelic 'O'Leathlobhair' meaning 'descendant of leathlobhair'. Leathlobhair derives from 'Leath' meaning 'Half' and 'Lobhar' meaning 'leper'.... [more]
LEASKScottish
Named after the village of Leask in Aberdeenshire, Scotland.... [more]
LECKEYScottish, English, Irish
Originally Scottish, but also found in England, Northern Ireland and Ireland. Possibly derives from the barony of Leckie (meaning "place of flagstones", from Gaelic leac, "flagstone") in Stirlingshire.
LEECHEnglish, Scottish
A physician.
LEITCHScottish, Scottish Gaelic
A physician in Old Scots.
LEITHEADScottish
From Scotland "Leith"
LEMONEnglish, Northern Irish, Scottish
English: from the Middle English personal name Lefman, Old English Leofman, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + mann ‘man’, ‘person’. This came to be used as a nickname for a lover or sweetheart, from Middle English lem(m)an... [more]
LIDDINGTONEnglish, Scottish (Rare)
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. "of Liddington", a parish in Rutland, near Uppingham; a parish in Wiltshire, near Swindon.
LINKLATERScottish
Scottish (Orkney) habitational name from either of two places named Linklater (in South Ronaldsay and North Sandwick).
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