Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is McLeeds.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ARENSBERG German
From Old High German arn 'eagle' and berg, 'mountain'.
BATHGATE Scottish, English
From the town of Bathgate, west of Edinburgh, Scotland. The town's name derives from Cumbric *beith, meaning 'boar' (Welsh baedd) and *gaith. meaning 'wood' (Welsh coed).
BEDWORTH English
An English habitational surname from a place so named near Nuneaton, in Warwickshire, derived most likely from the Old English personal name Baeda (see Bede), suffixed with worþ, 'enclosure', denoting an enclosed area of land belonging to Baeda.
CUTHBERTSON English, Scottish
Patronymic surname from the personal name Cuthbert.
ENGLANDER German, Jewish
Ethnic name derived from German Engländer, meaning 'Englishman', thus denoting an incomer from England. In some cases, the Jewish name may be an ornamental adoption.
FRANKLAND English
Status name for a person whom lived on an area of land without having to pay obligations. From Norman French frank, 'free' and Middle English land, 'land'. This surname is common in Yorkshire.... [more]
GERRARD English
From the given name Gerrard.
GOLDBERG German, Jewish, Danish
From German gold 'gold' and -berg, meaning 'gold-mountain'.
GREENLAW English
From one of two placenames, located near the Anglo-Scottish border. Named with Old English grēne, 'green' and halw, 'hill, mound'.
GROHL German
Meaning uncertain, but likely a variant of Groll.
GROLL German
Derived from grollen, 'to be angry', often used as a nickname for an angry or sulky individual.
GUNN Scottish
This ancient Scottish surname is of Norweigan origin derived from the Old Norse personal name Gunnr. This surname, in most cases originated in Caithness, Scotland's most northerly county.
HARRIS Welsh
A combination of the Welsh adjective 'hy', meaning 'bold' or 'presumptuous' and the common Welsh personal name 'Rhys'. This surname is common in South Wales and the English West Country and has an official Welsh tartan... [more]
HELMSLEY English
This English habitational name originates with the North Yorkshire village of Helmsley, named with the Old English personal name Helm and leah, meaning 'clearing'.
JEWETT English
A mainly Northern English surname, derived from a pet form of Julian.
JEWITT English
Variant of Jewett.
LAMPERT German, English
German & English variant of Lambert.... [more]
LAUDER Scottish, Northern Irish
From a village in Berwickshire in the Scottish Borders. It derives from the Celtic Lauuedder, probably indicating a rapidly flowing river, cognate with Modern Welsh llifer meaning 'to gush'.
LAWLER Irish, Scottish
This Irish surname is of Gaelic language origin. The surname derives from the original Gaelic 'O'Leathlobhair' meaning 'descendant of leathlobhair'. Leathlobhair derives from 'Leath' meaning 'Half' and 'Lobhar' meaning 'leper'.... [more]
LEEDS English
From the city of Leeds in Yorkshire. The name was first attested in the form Loidis in AD 731. In the Domesday Book of 1086, it is recorded as 'Ledes'. This name is thought to have ultimately been derived from an earlier Celtic name... [more]
MAUGHAN Irish, English
Anglicized from the original Irish Gaelic form Ò Mocháin meaning 'descendant of Mochain'. This name was one of the earliest known Irish surnames brought to England and remains a fairly common surname in the North East of the country.
MCCAMBRIDGE Scottish
Anglicized from Gaelic Mac Ambróis, "son of Ambrose". This name, influenced in its spelling by the English city name Cambridge, is well-established in Northern Ireland.
MCGILLIVRAY Scottish
From Scottish Gaelic Mac Gille Bhràtha from a patronymic from a personal name meaning ‘servant of judgment’.
METCALFE English
An occupational name from Northern England, from Old English mete, 'food' and calf, 'calf', i.e calfs being fattened for consumption in late summer. Thus, making this surname an occupational name for either a slaughterer or herdsman... [more]
ØSTHAGEN Norwegian
An uncommon Norwegian surname of uncertain origin. It is most likely a locational name, derived from Norwegian øst, 'east' and hagen, 'enclosure'. ... [more]
PETTIE Scottish
Predominantly Scottish form of Petty.
PHILLISKIRK English (Rare)
From a 'lost' medieval parish in England or Scotland, named with the Old Norse element kirk meaning 'church' or 'place of worship'.... [more]
PRESLEY Scottish
From Persley, a small Scottish hamlet on the River Don, Aberdeenshire, now a suburb of the much larger city of Aberdeen, named perhaps with the Pictish word *pres-, meaning 'bushes' or 'undergrowth'.... [more]
REITH Scottish (Anglicized), Irish
A Scottish surname of uncertain origin.... [more]
RENSHAW English, Scottish
A habitational surname from any of the so-called or like-sounding places in the United Kingdom. These include Renishaw in Derbyshire, Ramshaw in Durham, the lost Renshaw in Cheshire and Radshaw in Yorkshire... [more]
RHEIN German
From the German name for the River Rhine, denoting somebody whom lived within close proximity to the river. The river name itself comes from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'run, flow').
RHINE German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
RODHAM English
From Roddam in Northumberland. The name is thought to have derived from Germanic *rodum, meaning 'forest clearing'.
RUGBY English
From Rugby, Warwickshire. Originally named *Rocheberie, from Old English *Hrocaburg, 'Hroca's fort', the name was altered due to influence fort Danish settlers, with the second element being replaced with Old Norse byr, 'farm'.... [more]
SCHOTTLAND ?
Uncertain. Would seem to be derived from Schottland, 'Scotland', thus an ethnic name for an individual of such descent. ... [more]
SCHOTTLANDER German, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]
SHINGLER English
An occupational name for someone who laid wooden tiles, or shingles on roofs, from an agent derivative of Middle English schingle ‘shingle’. ... [more]
SOWERBY English
Habitational name from any places so-called in Northern England. Named from Old Norse saurr, 'mud, filth' and by, 'farm, estate'.
SUNDERLAND English
Habitational name from any of the locations with the name 'Sunderland', most notably the port city County Durham. This, along with other examples in Lancashire, Cumbria and Northumberland derives from either Old English sundor 'seperate' and land 'land' or Old Norse suðr 'southern' and land 'land' (see Sutherland)... [more]
TALLENTIRE English (Rare)
From a small village in Cumbria, England, meaning 'head of the land' in Cumbric.
WAITS English
Patronymic form of Waite.
WALLACH Scottish
Variant of Wallace, meaning 'foreigner' that is found chiefly in Dumfries.
WINEHOUSE Jewish, German
Anglicized variant of German and Yiddish 'Weinhaus'. From German wein, 'vine, grapevine' and haus 'house, building, home', likely indicating a house with a vineyard. ... [more]