English (American) Submitted Surnames

These names are a subset of English names used more often in America. See also about American names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Aamoth English (American, Anglicized)
Anglicized form of the Norwegian surname Aamodt.
Aanenson English (American, Anglicized)
Anglicized form of rare Norwegian surname Ånundson meaning "son of Ånund".
Acuff English (American)
Acuff Name Meaning. English: of uncertain origin, perhaps a variant of northern English Aculf, from an Old Norse personal name Agúlfr 'terror wolf'... [more]
Ahrenaldi English (Rare), English (American, Rare)
Possibly an Americanized version of Italian Arenaldi
Albany Scottish, English (American)
From the title of the Dukes of Albany (House of Stuart), hence a name borne by their retainers. It is an infrequent surname in England and Scotland. The city of Albany, NY (formerly the Dutch settlement of Beverwijck or Fort Orange) was named for James Stuart, Duke of York and Albany; he was the brother of King Charles II and later king in his own right as James II... [more]
Amundson English (American, Anglicized), Swedish (Rare)
Anglicized from or rare Swedish variant of Amundsen.
Arabia English (American)
Americanized form of French Arabie.
Ariq English (American)
This name means a men with many gifts. The first person with the name spelled as this was an gangbanger from Covington, Kentucky. He died in 1998.
Arola Spanish, Catalan, Occitan, English (American)
From Latin areola, diminutive of area (area).
Artell English (American)
Artell is a name that was brought to England by the ancestors of the Artell family when they emigrated following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Artell comes from the Dutch surname Van Arkel. The name Van Arkel may spring from the Anglo-Saxon form of Hercules, which is Ercol.
Baltimore English (American)
From the name of the American city of Baltimore, and an anglicisation of Irish Gaelic Baile an Tí Mhóir meaning "town of the big house".
Beaber English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Bieber or Biber, from Middle High German biber ‘beaver’, hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal in some way, a topographic name for someone who lived in a place frequented by beavers or by a field named with this word, or a habitational name from any of various place names in Hesse containing this element.
Beachum English (American)
Variant of Beauchamp, reflecting the traditional English pronunciation.
Bearcub English (American, Rare)
Surname meaning a bear cub.
Beard English (American)
Nickname for a bearded man (Middle English, Old English beard). To be clean-shaven was the norm in non-Jewish communities in northwestern Europe from the 12th to the 16th century, the crucial period for surname formation... [more]
Becraft English (American)
English, variant of Beecroft. topographic name for someone who lived at a place where bees were kept, from Middle English bee ‘bee’ + croft ‘paddock’, ‘smallholding’.
Bjorklund English (American)
Anglicized form of Swedish Björklund or Norwegian Bjørklund.
Bloodgood English (American), Dutch (Americanized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Bloetgoet. The progenitor of the American Bloodgood family was Francis Bloodgood, a 17th-century Dutch emigrant to Flushing, Queens, New York, originally named Frans Jansen Bloetgoet.
Boebert English (American)
A notable bearer of this surname is Lauren Opal Boebert (Born on December 15, 1986) who is an American (U.S.A.) politician, businesswoman, and gun rights activist, serving as the U.S. Representative for Colorado’s 3rd congressional district since 2021... [more]
Bomengen English (American), Norwegian (Rare)
Name created from during immigration from Norway to the United States in either the late 19th or early 20th century meaning, "The farm with the big gate."
Braley English (American)
A New England variant spelling of Brailey. French: from a diminutive of Brael, from Old French braiel, a belt knotted at the waist to hold up breeches; presumably an occupational name for a maker of such belts... [more]
Breyette English (American)
Of uncertain origin and meaning. First found in the United States around 1880. Self-taught artist Michael Breyette is a bearer of this surname
Brower English (American)
English variant of Brewer. Respelling of Brauer or Brouwer.
Buckwalter English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Buchwalder.
Bundy English (American)
This surname is most recognizable in North America as belonging to the serial killer named Ted Bundy who committed his crimes in the 1970s.
Burtram English (American)
American form of the German surname Bertram.
Burtsell English (American)
Habitational name from Burshill in East Yorkshire, so named with Old English bryst ‘landslip’, ‘rough ground’ + hyll ‘hill’.
Buttram English (American, Rare), English (British, Rare)
Possibly derived from the German cognate Bertram, from the Germanic elements beraht (meaning "bright"), and hrabn (meaning "raven")... [more]
Bycraft English (American, Rare, ?)
Found mostly in the American Great Lakes region and Canada, likely a singular extended family. Likely of 6th century English descent, though there are very few English natives who bear the name. Name either refers to the occupation running some sort of mill machine, the original holder living near a croft (enclosed pasture or tillage) or implies "craftiness" of its original holder.
Carling English (American)
Americanized form of German Garling or Gerling.
Caroso English (American)
Surname of Panther Caroso from the Star Fox 64 series.
Carrender English (American)
Probably from Scottish kerr meaning "rough, wet ground" combined with ender (possibly related to the end of something). It probably denoted someone who lived between rough, wet ground and normal ground.
Cena English (American), English
Cena is a prominently used English name. It is derived from the word "see", however it rather than referring to the ability to see it, what it actually refers to is the inability to see as the other half of the name ("-na") means "naw" a synonym for "no"... [more]
Cestare English (American, Modern)
There is a similar name, Sastre, which is the Spanish form of the surname Sarto, meaning "tailor." The name CESTARE is phonetically similar to Sastre and could be a derivative of that name.... [more]
Chedder English (American)
this name comes from the name cheddar cheese
Clester English (American)
Probably an Americanized form of Dutch Klooster .
Clinger English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Klinger.Possibly a variant of Clinker. an English occupational name for a maker or fixer of bolts and rivets.
Clore English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Klor (from a short form of the medieval personal name Hilarius (see Hillary) or Klar).
Coish Anglo-Saxon, English, English (Australian), English (American)
Derived from Old English cosche and cosshe (c.1490), meaning "small cottage" or "hut". The medieval Coish family held a seat in Cambridgeshire.
Coles English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
Corder French (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
Core English (American), German (Anglicized)
Core is the anglicized form of the German surname Kohr, also spelled Kürr. Alternately, it is an English name of Flemish origin.
Corso Italian, English (American), Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Either derived from the given name Bonaccorso or taken from Italian and Spanish corso, denoting someone who lived in Corsica.
Craft English (American)
Variant of Croft and Americanized spelling of Kraft.
Cunnington English (American)
Scottish linked to {Marshall}
Daisy English (American)
Taken from the given name Daisy
Darter English (American)
variant of Daughter
Deen English (American)
The History of the Name Deen Derives from England, over time spelling variations have existed. The name Deen is used by mostly American English people.
Deetz English (American)
Surname of the characters, Delia, Charles and gothic daughter, Lydia from the movie and TV series, Beetlejuice.
Delaney English (American)
It Oragionally Came From The Norman Surname Dulaney And The Irish... [more]
Dickensheets English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Dickenscheid, a habitational name from a place named Dickenschied in the Hunsrück region. The place name is from Middle High German dicke ‘thicket’, ‘woods’ + -scheid (often schied) ‘border area’ (i.e. ridge, watershed), ‘settler’s piece of cleared (wood)land’.
Dickson English (American)
This surname means son of Dick and son of Richard.
Dills English (American)
1 Variant spelling of Dutch Dils .... [more]
Dollar Scottish, English (American)
Scottish: habitational name from Dollar in Clackmannanshire.... [more]
Eagleburger English (American)
Americanized form of German Adelberger, a habitational name for someone from a place called Adelberg near Stuttgart.
Earhart English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Ehrhardt.
Echelbarger English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Eichelberger.
Eilish Irish, English (American)
From the given name Eilish.
Ervin English (American)
meaning : little hare
Failor English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Failer or Fehler, variants of Feiler.
Fore English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Fahr.
Fraley English (American)
Anglicized/Americanized version of the German surname "Frohlich", meaning "happy" or "cheerful".
Frémont French (Americanized), English (American)
Fremont is a French surname meaning Free Mountain. People include John Frémont a US Explorer and Politician who fought in the Mexican-American War to free California and many places named after him, Including Fremont, California, and Fremont Nebraska.
Fyler English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Feiler.
Gabriella English (American)
Derived from the given name Gabriella.
Gaffney English (American)
This may sound like the female given name Daphne
Gamiz American (Hispanic, Anglicized, Rare), Spanish, Filipino, English (American)
The last name Gamiz is a varient of Gamez and Gomez. It is a very rare last name that not many people have.
Gardlin English (American, Rare)
Possibly an anglicized form of a Swedish surname like Gardelin.
Gasper English (American, Rare)
Variant of Jasper. George Gasper is a famous American Mathematician.
Gayler English (American)
Variant of Gaylord
Gearhart English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Gierhard, a variant of Gerhardt.
Gipson English (American)
Variant of Gibson more commonly used in the United States.
Glasgow English (American), English (British)
Derived from the city of Glasgow in Scotland.
Goodyear English (American), English (Canadian)
Derived from the Medieval English phrase goodyeare, literally meaning "good year".
Goof English (American, Rare)
The name has been Anglicized from the Dutch short form Goof, from Govert, with its roots from the Dutch and Limburgish cognate Godfried... [more]
Graybill English (American)
Anglicized form of Swiss German Krähenbühl, meaning "crow hill".
Groover English (American)
Americanized form of German Gruber.
Haizlip English (American)
American variant spelling of Scottish Hyslop.
Haschak English (American)
This may be influenced from the English word hashtag, meaning number.
Helgeson English (American), Swedish (Rare)
Variant or anglicized form of Helgesson or Helgesen.
Helgren English (American)
Americanized form of Swedish Hellgren.
Hennebery English (American)
A berry and an alias used by March McQuin
Herbaugh English (American)
Americanized form of German Harbach.
Hicklin English (American)
The closest surname found is Hickey, an Irish name dirived from descendant from the healer.... [more]
Horvitz English (American)
Surname of Richard Steven Horvitz, a voice actor in Angry Beavers, The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, and Invader Zim.
Hotaling English (American)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Hoogteijling, an indirect occupational name for a productive farmer, from hoogh ‘high’ + teling ‘cultivation’, ‘breeding’.
Huckleberry English (American)
Anglicized form of German Hackelberg.
Huskey English (American)
Likely was named after an person who owned a husky
Jacoway English (American)
Altered form of the personal name Jacques.
Jankins English (American)
Variant of Jenkins.
Jimeno American (Hispanic), English (American)
Jimeno (pronounced He-me-no in English) is a Hispanic last name varient of Gimeno, Ximeno, or Jimenez... [more]
Kaigler English (American)
Americanized spelling of Kegler.
Kingsolver English (American)
Altered form of English Consolver, which is unexplained. Compare Kinsolving.
Kitzmiller English (American)
Americanized form of German Kitzmüller, literally ‘kid miller’ ( see Kitz + Muller ), a nickname for a miller who kept goats; alternatively, the first element may be from a personal name formed with the Germanic element Gid-, cognate with Old English gidd ‘song’.
Kroma English (American)
Surname of popular YouTuber Justin Kroma (LankyBox).
Kromrey English (American, Rare)
Kromrey middle school.
Kyer English (American)
Anglicized form of Geier.
Kyler English (American)
Anglicized form of Cuyler.
Learn English (American)
The surname Learn is traced to an 18th-century settler and his family who lived in what is now Tannersville, Pa. It is an Anglicized version of the Germanic "Loehrner," which name the settler and his family also used.
Loafman English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Laufmann.
Lorsan English (American, Rare, Archaic)
Early American variant of Swedish Larson.
Lukehart English (American)
Americanized form of German Luckhardt.
Mahloy English (American)
Mahloy is a misspelling of Malloy by Charles Malloy's (b. 1898, Scotland) elementary school teacher in the Ireland. The surname Malloy is derived from the pre 10th century Old Gaelic name O'Maolmhuidh, meaning the descendant of the Great Chief.
Maness English (American)
Probably a variant of Manes.
Mavros English (American)
Means "Black" in Greek.
Mehoff Bulgarian, English (American)
Variant transcription of Mehov.
Mickelson English (American, Anglicized)
Anglicization of the Danish-Norwegian surname Mikkelsen, which means "son of Mikkel," a variant of the personal name Michael.
Mier Spanish, Dutch, English (American)
As a Spanish name relates to late summer and means "harvest" or "ripened".... [more]
Millsap English (American), English
Judging by the name and how it sounds, I guess it's occupational. This is the name of a town in Texas, named after Fuller Millsap.
Moneymaker English (American)
Translated form of German Geldmacher or Geldschläger, occupational names for a coiner.
Moscow English (American, Rare)
From the city of Moscow in Russia.
Murchison English (American)
May be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic "Mac Mhurchaidh" meaning "Son of Sea Warrior"
Murkerson English (American)
May be related to the surname Murchison
Nelms English (American)
Topographic name for someone who lived near or amid a grove of elm trees, from misdivision of Middle English atten elmes ‘at the elms’
Nelvin English (American)
Female named after her uncle who surname was Melvin. Born in Shreveport, Louisiana in 1931.
Newcomer English (American)
Nickname for a person who was new to a town or location, from Old English niwe meaning "new" and cumen meaning "to come".
Nine English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Nein or Neun, from Middle High German niun meaning "nine".
Nordeen English (American)
Perhaps an anglicization of Nordin or Nordén.
November English (American)
From the name of the month.
Nunnallys English (American)
A common surname in America, belonging to 4058 individuals. Nunnally is most common among White (63.36%) and Black/African American (30.93%) individuals.
Oakleaf English (American)
Probably an Americanized (translated) form of Swedish Eklöf.
Officer English (Canadian), English (American, Rare)
Occupational name for the holder of any office, from Anglo-Norman French officer (an agent derivative of Old French office ‘duty’, ‘service’, Latin officium ‘service’, ‘task’).
Ord English, English (American)
Ord is an English descent surname that also has Gaelic roots. It's also short for many English surnames that end with "Ord". people include US Army general Edward Ord who practiced in California and had many street names after him.
Ormay English (American)
Believed to be the Americanization of the last name Ormoi from Hungary.
Oss English (American)
Americanized Varient of Aas
Oyaski English (American)
A surname created by Michael Oyaski (formally Michael O'Yaski). The surname is currently known to only be used by one particular branch of the O'Yaski family tree. The surname means "Dragon Rider of the West" according to members of the Oyaski family.
Pash English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Pasch.
Pearcy English (American)
Variant of Percy, which is a name derived from Perci, a parish and canton near St. Lo, in Normandy
Pendarvis English (American)
The American English spelling of the Cornish surname Pendarves. Ultimately, the surname is traced back to Pendarves Island, Cornwall.
Perpich English (American)
Americanized spelling of Croatian and Serbian Prpić. Prporuše was a term denoting young girls who, in the dry season, would visit houses in the village and pray for rain.
Pines English (American)
Surname of the characters, Dipper, Mabel and Stan from Gravity Falls.
Powalski English (American)
Surname of Leon Powalski from the Star Fox 64 series.
Prude English (American)
This surname comes from the English word prude. The definition for the word prude is a person who is or claims to be easily shocked by matters relating to sex or nudity.
Puett English (American)
Americinized form of Pütt.
Rainwater English (American)
Americanized form of the German family name Reinwasser, possibly a topographic name for someone who lived by a source of fresh water, from Middle High German reine ‘pure’ + wazzer ‘water’.
Raish English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Raisch.
Rassmussen English (American, Rare)
Americanized spelling of Danish and Norwegian Rasmussen.
Ravenswood English (American)
Ravenswood is a gothic surname.
Raynes English (American)
Patronymic version of many Germanic names with the first element starting with "ragin"
Rinard English (American)
An Americanized version of the German Surname Reinhardt.
Ryerson English (American)
Americanized spelling of Swedish Reierson or of any of its cognates, for example Dutch Ryerse, Ryersen or Norwegian and Danish Reiersen.