Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is EncyclopediaBrown.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
BAIO Italian
From a nickname for someone with light brown or reddish-brown hair or beard, from baio meaning "bay horse", ultimately derived from Late Latin badius meaning "red-brown".
BARREIRA Portuguese, Galician
From several habitations in Galicia and Portugal, from barreira meaning "clay or loam hollow".
BARRERA Spanish, Catalan
Either a topographic name for someone who lived near a gate or fence, from Spanish and Catalan barrera meaning "barrier", or a topographic name for someone who lived by a clay pit, from Spanish barrero, derived from the Spanish word barro meaning "mud, clay".
BENAVIDES Spanish
Patronymic name from the Medieval personal name Ben Avid, of Arabic origin, derived from ibn Abd meaning "son of the servant of God".
BEVIER French (German)
From Old French bevier, meaning "a measure of land". This was probably a nickname for someone who owned or worked such a piece of land. This surname was first found in Austria, where the name Bevier came from humble beginnings but gained a significant reputation for its contribution to the emerging medieval society.
BREYER German (Americanized)
Americanized variant of Brauer.
CORSAUT French
Possibly a variant of Cossart.
COSSART English, French
From French, referring to "a dealer of horses" (related to the English word "courser"). This surname was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and became one of the many Anglo-Norman words that made up Middle English.
GINSBERG Jewish
Ornamental varient of Ginsburg
GINSBURG German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone who came from Gunzberg in Bavaria, Günsburg in Swabia, or Gintsshprik (Königsburg) in East Prussia. Its origin is from the name of the river Günz, written in early Latin documents as Guntia, which was probably of Celtic origin, and Old High German burg meaning "Fortress, walled town".
GOODFRIEND English
Nickname for a reliable friend or neighbor, from Middle English gode meaning "good", and frend meaning "friend". It is an English translation and cognate of German Gutfreund, from Middle High German guot meaning "good" and vriunt meaning "friend".
GORSUCH English
Habitational name from the hamlet of Gorsuch, Lancashire, earlier Gosefordsich, derived from Old English gosford meaning "goose ford" and sic meaning "small stream".
KAGAN Jewish (Russian)
Eastern Ashkenazic form of Cohen.
KNOTT English
Either from the Middle English personal name Knut, or denoting a person who lived "at the knot", which is the summit of a rocky hill.
KNOTTS English
Variant of Knott
MOST German
Metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of must, i.e. unfermented grape juice, from Middle High German most, ultimately derived from Latin mustum vinum meaning "young (i.e. fresh) wine"... [more]
MOST Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived in a place where moss grew.
MOST Polish, Jewish
Topographic name from Slavic most meaning "bridge", or a habitational name from any of several places named with this word.
MUSTIN English
Origin uncertain, possibly a variant of Muston or Musto.
NEIGHBOR English
From the Middle English word neighbor, derived from neghebour, which in turn comes from the Old English words neah, meaning "near", and gebur, meaning "a dweller". This may have been used as a nickname for someone who was a 'good neighbor', more likely it evolved from the term of address for someone living nearby.
PYLE English
From the Middle English word pile, meaning "stake" or "post", which is derived via Old English from Latin pilum, meaning "spike" or "javelin". This was a topographic name for someone who lived near a stake or post serving as a landmark, a metonymic occupational name for a stake maker, or a nickname for a tall, strong man.
PYLE Dutch
Metonymic occupational name for a marksman or an arrowsmith, from pijl meaning "arrow".
SCALIA Italian
Habitational name derived from Scalea in the province of Cosenza, deriving ultimately from medieval Greek skaleia meaning "hoeing".
SOUTER English, Scottish
Occupational name for a cobbler or shoemaker, derived from Middle English soutere, from Old Norse sutare, ultimately derived from Latin sutor meaning "to sew".
VEACH Scottish
Variant of Veitch.
VEITCH Scottish
Derived from the Latin word vacca which means "cow". This was either an occupational name for a cowherd or a nickname for a gentle person.
VREELAND Dutch
Habitational name for a person from a place bearing the same name in the province of Utrecht, which is itself derived from the Middle Dutch word vrede, meaning "legal protection against armed violence".