Scottish Submitted Surnames

Scottish names are used in the country of Scotland as well as elsewhere in the Western World as a result of the Scottish diaspora. See also about Scottish names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
REEKIE Scottish
Perhaps "person from Reikie", Aberdeenshire, or from a different form of the Scottish male personal name Rikie, literally "little Richard".
REITH Scottish (Anglicized), Irish
A Scottish surname of uncertain origin.... [more]
RENDALL Scottish, English
Variant of Randall. Habitational name from Rendall in Orkney. Possibly also an Americanization of Swedish Rendahl.
RENFREW Scottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic Rinn Friù, meaning "cradle of the Royal Stewards." It is derived from either the historical county of Renfrewshire in the west central lowlands of Scotland, or the town of Renfrew within both the historical and present-day boundaries of the county.
RENSHAW English, Scottish
A habitational surname from any of the so-called or like-sounding places in the United Kingdom. These include Renishaw in Derbyshire, Ramshaw in Durham, the lost Renshaw in Cheshire and Radshaw in Yorkshire... [more]
RENWICK Scottish (Rare)
A habitational name from a place in Cumbria, so called from the Old English byname Hræfn meaning "raven" + wic "outlying settlement".
RIDDELL Scottish, English
From a Norman personal name, Ridel. Reaney explains this as a nickname from Old French ridel ‘small hill’ (a diminutive of ride ‘fold’, of Germanic origin), but a more probable source is a Germanic personal name derived from the element rīd ‘ride’.
RIDDICK Scottish
A different form of Reddick ("person from Rerwick or Rerrick", Dumfries and Galloway (perhaps "robbers' outlying settlement")). A fictional bearer of the surname is Richard B. Riddick, (anti)hero of the 'Chronicles of Riddick' movies.
ROBIN Scottish, English, French, German
From the personal name Robin, a pet form of Robert, composed of the short form Rob and the hypocoristic suffix -in.
ROGER Scottish, English, North German, French, Catalan
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hrōd "renown" and gār, gēr "spear, lance", which was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Rog(i)er... [more]
ROLAND French, German, Scottish
French, German, English, and Scottish: from a Germanic personal name composed hrod ‘renown’ + -nand ‘bold’, assimilated to -lant ‘land’. (Compare Rowland).... [more]
ROLLO Scottish
From a Latinized form, common in early medieval documents, of the personal name Rou(l), the usual Norman form of Rolf.
RULE Scottish, English
Scottish name from the lands of Rule in the parish of Hobkirk, Roxburghshire. The derivation is from the River Rule which flows through the area, and is so called from the ancient Welsh word "rhull" meaning "hasty or rushing".... [more]
RUNCIE English, Scottish
Derived from Latin runcinus, and related to the Old French "roncin", for a horse of little value. Middle English, Rouncy, as in Chaucer's Cantebury Tales.... [more]
RUSBY Scottish, English
Alternative spelling of Busby, a parish in Renfrewshire. A name well represented in the Penistone, and Cawthorne districts of the West Riding of Yorkshire.
RUTLEDGE English, Scottish
Origin unknown
SAND English, Scottish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived on patch of sandy soil, from the vocabulary word sand. As a Swedish or Jewish name it was often purely ornamental.
SANDISON Scottish
Possibly a Scottish variant of Sanderson.
SCHADE German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
SCOBIE Scottish
Means "person from Scobie", an unidentified place in Perth and Kinross ("thorny place"). A fictional bearer is Henry Scobie, the conscience-wracked and ultimately suicidal deputy commissioner of police in Graham Greene's West Africa-set novel 'The Heart of the Matter' (1948).
SCOGGINS Scottish
Scottish form of the Dutch Scroggins surname.
SEATTER Scottish
From an ancient barony called "The lands of Setter", Stromness, Orkney. Derives from the Ancient Norse word "saetr" meaning a hut or shelter for animals.
SETH Scottish, Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Sithigh or Ó Síthigh (see Sheehy).
SETON Scottish
It has been claimed in the past that the name Seton is Norman in origin, however evidence points to it being Flemish. Various suggestions have been put forward regarding the derivation of the name but nothing proved conclusively; it probably means "town by the sea" and possibly derives from the "sea town" of Staithes in modern day North Yorkshire... [more]
SHADE English, German, Dutch, Scottish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary, from Old English scead ‘boundary’.nickname for a very thin man, from Middle English schade ‘shadow’, ‘wraith’.... [more]
SHEEPSHANKS Scottish
From a medieval Scottish and northern English nickname for someone with a strange or awkward way of walking (literally "sheeplegs").
SIM Scottish, Dutch
Scottish and Dutch: from the personal name Sim, a short form of Simon.
SINCLAIR Scottish (Anglicized)
Clan Sinclair is a Scottish clan, which held lands in the highlands; thought to have come to Scotland from France after the Norman invasion.
SLACK English, Dutch, Scottish
English and Dutch: nickname for an idle person, from Middle Dutch slac, Middle English slack, ‘lazy’, ‘careless’. ... [more]
SMILEY Scots, English
From elements small and lea meaning "a small clearing" or as a nickname may refer to a person of happy disposition known for smiling.
SMOLLETT English, Scottish
From a nickname for someone who had a small head.
SNAPE English (British), Scottish
An old, now rare surname, with various origins in Suffolk and Yorkshire in England and Lanarkshire in Scotland. This is also the name of Severus Snape, a character from J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter book series.
SOMERVILLE Scottish, Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Scottish (of Norman origin) habitational name, probably from Graveron Sémerville in Nord, named with the Germanic personal name Sigimar (see Siemer) + Old French ville ‘settlement’. ... [more]
SORLIE Scottish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Somhairle.
SOUTER English, Scottish
Occupational name for a cobbler or shoemaker, derived from Middle English soutere, from Old Norse sutare, ultimately derived from Latin sutor meaning "to sew".
SPENS Scottish
Variant of SPENCE.
STEVEN Scottish, English, Dutch, North German
From the personal name Steven, a vernacular form of Latin Stephanus, Greek Stephanos "crown". This was a popular name throughout Christendom in the Middle Ages, having been borne by the first Christian martyr, stoned to death at Jerusalem three years after the death of Christ... [more]
STIGWARD Scottish, Danish, Swedish
The proper form of "Stewart"
STINSON English, Scottish
This is one of the many patronymic forms of the male given name Stephen, i.e. son of Stephen. From these forms developed the variant patronymics which include Stim(p)son, Stenson, Steenson, and Stinson.
STIRRETT Scottish
Variant of Starrett, probably via Sterrett (since that would better explain the sound transformation).
STOCKARD Scottish Gaelic, Dutch
Scottish: occupational name for a trumpeter, Gaelic stocaire, an agent derivative of stoc ‘Gaelic trumpet’. The name is borne by a sept of the McFarlanes.... [more]
STOUT Scottish, English
Probably a nickname for a brave or powerfully built man, from Middle English stout ‘steadfast’. A contrary origin derives from the Old Norse byname Stútr ‘gnat’, denoting a small and insignificant person.
STRACHAN Scottish
Scottish habitational name from a place in the parish of Banchory, Kincardineshire, which is first recorded in 1153 in the form Strateyhan, and is perhaps named from Gaelic srath ‘valley’ + eachain, genitive case of eachan ‘foal’.
SUMMERLIN English, German, Scottish
An English surname.... [more]
SUTTIE Scottish
Habitational surname for a person from a place called Suthie in Perthshire or possibly from Suddy (or Suddie) in Knockbain.
SWAIN Scottish, Irish, English
Northern English occupational name for a servant or attendant, from Middle English swein "young man attendant upon a knight", which was derived from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant, attendant"... [more]
SWAN English, Scottish
Originally given as a nickname to a person who was noted for purity or excellence, which were taken to be attributes of the swan, or who resembled a swan in some other way. In some cases it may have been given to a person who lived at a house with the sign of a swan... [more]
SWANNEY Scottish
Habitational name from Swannay, Orkney
SWINTON English, Scottish
From various place names composed of Old English swin "pig, wild boar" and tun "settlement, enclosure".
SYMINGTON Scottish
Habitational surname derived from the places of the same name, derived from the given name Simon and northern Middle English ‘ton’ meaning settlement. Symington is also the name of several places found in Southern Scotland.
TELFER Scottish, English, Italian
From a personal name based on a byname for a strong man or ferocious warrior, from Old French taille or tailler "to cut" + fer "iron" Latin: ferrum "iron" (see Tagliaferro).
TENNANT Scottish
The Strathclyde-Briton people of ancient Scotland were the first to use the name Tennant. It is a name for someone who works as a tenant farmer. The name was applied to those who paid for the rent on their land through working the fields and donating a percentage of the take to the landlord... [more]
TERRACE Scottish
Possibly means "from Tarras", a place in Morayshire, Scotland.
THAIN Scots, English
Occupational surname meaning a nobleman who served as an attendant to royals or who was awarded land by a king.
THANE Scots, English
Occupational surname meaning a nobleman who served as an attendant to royals or who was awarded land by a king. Variant of Thain.
TORRENCE Scottish, Irish
Scottish and northern Irish habitational name from either of two places called Torrance (one near East Kilbride, the other north of Glasgow under the Campsie Fells), named with Gaelic torran ‘hillock’, ‘mound’, with the later addition of the English plural -s.... [more]
TOUGH Scottish, English
Scottish variant of Tulloch. In Scotland it is pronounced tyookh. ... [more]
TOW Scottish
Scottish: Variation of Tulloch.... [more]
TOWLES Scottish
“Towles” is not to be confused with “towels” - note the placement of the “les” vs. “els” — as this clarifies pronunciation.
TRIMBLE English, Scottish, Northern Irish
A variant of Trumble, recorded in Northern Ireland since the 17th century.... [more]
TROTTER English, Scottish, German
Northern English and Scottish: occupational name for a messenger, from an agent derivative of Middle English trot(en) 'to walk fast' (Old French troter, of Germanic origin). ... [more]
TULLOCH Scottish
Scottish habitational name from a place near Dingwall on the Firth of Cromarty, named with Gaelic tulach ‘hillock’, ‘mound’, or from any of various other minor places named with this element.
TULLY Scottish
Habitational name from any of various places called Tullo in eastern Scotland.
URIE Scottish, English, Irish
From the Scottish Fetteresso parish, Kincardineshire. May mean someone who is brave and loud.
VALEN English, Scottish
English and Scottish: from a medieval personal name, Latin Valentinus, a derivative of Valens (see also Valente), which was never common in England, but is occasionally found from the end of the 12th century, probably as the result of French influence... [more]
VALIANT English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from Old French vaillant meaning "heroic, courageous".
VEACH Scottish
Variant of Veitch.
VEITCH Scottish
Derived from the Latin word vacca which means "cow". This was either an occupational name for a cowherd or a nickname for a gentle person.
VERMILION Scottish
From the name of the bright red color that is halfway betweed red and orange.
VINT English, Scottish
Either an English habitational name from places so named, or a Scottish variant of Wint.
WAKE English, Scottish
From the Old Norse byname Vakr meaning "wakeful", "vigilant" (from vaka meaning "to remain awake"), or perhaps from a cognate Old English Waca (attested in place names such as Wakeford, Wakeham, and Wakeley).
WALDRON Medieval German, Old Norman, Scottish Gaelic, English (British)
Derived from the German compound wala-hran, literally "wall raven", but originally meaning "strong bird". Also derived from the Gaelic wealdærn, meaning "forest dwelling", thought to be derived from the Sussex village of Waldron... [more]
WALES English (Modern), Scottish
English and Scottish patronymic from Wale.
WALKINSHAW Scottish
Habitational name from Walkinshaw in Renfrewshire, which was probably named from Old English wealcere meaning "fuller" + sceaga meaning "copse".
WALLACH Scottish
Variant of Wallace, meaning 'foreigner' that is found chiefly in Dumfries.
WALLAS English, Scottish
A variant of Wallace. The name originates from Scotland and its meaning is "foreigner" or "from the south", taken to mean someone from Wales or England.
WANN Scottish
WANN. Surname or Family name. Origin Scottish and English: nickname from Middle English wann ‘wan’, ‘pale’ (the meaning of the word in Old English was, conversely, ‘dark’).
WARDEN English, Scottish, Northern Irish
From Norman French wardein and warder meaning "to guard". It coincides the English word warden and can be used as an occupational surname for a warden.
WARDROP Scottish
Metonymic occupational name for someone who was in charge of the garments worn by a feudal lord and his household, from Norman French warde(r) meaning "to keep or guard" + robe meaning "garment".
WATTERSON Scottish, Northern Irish
From an altered form of the given name Walter.
WEIR Scottish, English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dam or weir on a river.
WELSH Scottish, English
Ethnic name for someone from Wales or a speaker of the Welsh language. Compare Walsh and Wallace.
WESTEN English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Weston, from Old English west 'west' + tun 'enclosure', 'settlement'. English: variant of Whetstone.
WESTWOOD English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Westwood, from Old English west "west" and wudu "wood".
WHITEHEAD English, Scottish
Nickname for someone with fair or prematurely white hair, from Middle English whit "white" and heved "head".
WIGHT Scottish, English
Nickname from Middle English wiht, wight "nimble, strong".
WILK Polish, Scottish, English
Polish: from Polish wilk ‘wolf’, probably from an Old Slavic personal name containing this element, but perhaps also applied as a nickname for someone thought to resemble a wolf or connected with wolves.... [more]
WILL Scottish, English, German
Scottish and northern English from the medieval personal name Will, a short form of William, or from some other medieval personal names with this first element, for example Wilbert or Willard... [more]
WORK Scottish
Scottish: habitational name from the lands of Work in the parish of St. Ola, Orkney.
WYND Scottish, Irish
Scotland or Ireland not sure of original origin. There was a childe Wynd some type of royal who slayed a dragon type thing worm or something and a Henery Wynd who was a mercenary in a battle at north inch in Scotland
YEAGER English, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of German JÄGER.
ZUILL English, Scottish
From the town of Zuill, Scotland. The "Z" pronounced as "Y" comes from ancient yogh representing a variety of sounds. The name itself is of unknown origin.