Norman Submitted Surnames

Norman names are used in Normandy in northeastern France and on the British Channel Islands.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ACEEnglish, Norman, Medieval French
The surname Ace's origin is from a Norman and Old French personal name, Ace, Asse, from Germanic Frankish origin Azzo, Atso, a pet form of personal names containing adal ‘noble’ as a first element.
AMORYEnglish, Norman
English from a Germanic personal name, Aimeri, composed of the elements haim ‘home’ + ric ‘power’. (The same elements constitute the etymology of Henry.) The name was introduced into England from France by the Normans... [more]
BACONEnglish, French, Norman
An occupational surname for someone who sold pork, from Middle English and Old French bacun or bacon, meaning 'bacon', which is ultimately of Germanic origin. Can also be derived from the Germanic given names Baco, Bacco, or Bahho, from the root bag-, meaning 'to fight'... [more]
BERNEREnglish, Norman
From the Norman personal name Bernier from Old English beornan ‘to burn’, hence an occupational name for a burner of lime (compare German Kalkbrenner) or charcoal. It may also have denoted someone who baked bricks or distilled spirits, or who carried out any other manufacturing process involving burning... [more]
BUNCENorman
Meaning "good" person in old french. Also means "bain"(exeptionaly tall) in old english
CAMPIONNorman, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: status name for a professional champion (see Champion, Kemp), from the Norman French form campion.
CARTIERFrench, Norman
Original Norman French form of Carter. A notable bearer was Breton-French explorer Jacques Cartier (1491-1557), who is known for discovering the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
CAVENorman, French, English
A name of various possible origins. As a Norman French name Cave can mean "bald" from cauf or it can mean "worker in a wine cellar" or "one who dwelt in or near a cave". As an English name Cave refers to a Yorkshire river whose fast current inspired the name meaning "swift".
D'ARCYEnglish, French, Norman
Originally a Norman French surname, meaning "from Arcy"... [more]
DAUGHTRYEnglish, Norman
English (of Norman origin) habitational name, with fused French preposition d(e), for someone from Hauterive in Orne, France, named from Old French haute rive ‘high bank’ (Latin alta ripa).
EMERYEnglish, French, Norman
English and French from a Germanic personal name, Emaurri, composed of the elements amja ‘busy’, ‘industrious’ + ric ‘power’. The name was introduced into England from France by the Normans... [more]
GAINESEnglish, Norman, Welsh
English (of Norman origin): nickname for a crafty or ingenious person, from a reduced form of Old French engaine ‘ingenuity’, ‘trickery’ (Latin ingenium ‘native wit’). The word was also used in a concrete sense of a stratagem or device, particularly a trap.... [more]
GAYEnglish, Norman
Habitational name from places in Normandy called Gaye, from an early proprietor bearing a Germanic personal name cognate with Wade.
GERMANEnglish, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
GREELEYEnglish, Norman
English (of Norman origin): nickname for someone with a pock-marked face, from Old Northern French greslé ‘pitted’, ‘scarred’ (from gresle ‘hailstone’, of Germanic origin).
HAROLDEnglish, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans. These all go back to a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari ‘army’ + wald ‘rule’, which is attested in Europe from an early date; the Roman historian Tacitus records a certain Cariovalda, chief of the Germanic tribe of the Batavi, as early as the 1st century ad... [more]
HERBARTHGerman, Norman
References Old Norse Deity "Odin" being one of the "Son's of Odin". Remember that the Geats became the Ostrogoths through the Denmark pass--referenced in Beowulf. Or, it means "Warrior of the Bearded One", perhaps a King... [more]
HURRELLEnglish, Norman
English (of Norman origin) from a derivative of Old French hurer ‘to bristle or ruffle’, ‘to stand on end’ (see Huron).
LEDGEREnglish, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’. The name was borne by a 7th-century bishop of Autun, whose fame contributed to the popularity of the name in France... [more]
LEGAULTNorman (Gallicized)
From the French "le Gaul," meaning simply "the Gaul." Gaul refers to the northern part of modern-day France.
LISLENorman, English, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: variant spelling of Lyle.
MAINScottish, English, French, Norman
Various origins explained include:... [more]
MANSELLEnglish (Canadian), Norman
Of Norman origin, a habitational or regional name from Old French mansel ‘inhabitant of Le Mans or the surrounding area of Maine’. The place was originally named in Latin (ad) Ceromannos, from the name of the Gaulish tribe living there, the Ceromanni... [more]
MASEYEnglish, Scottish, French, Norman
English and Scottish (of Norman origin) and French: habitational name from any of various places in northern France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name Maccius + the locative suffix -acum.... [more]
PACKARDEnglish, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
PARSLEYMedieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
PRUDHOMMEFrench, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
TALBOTEnglish, Norman
Disputed origin, but likely from a Germanic given name composed of the elements tal "to destroy" and bod "message". In this form the name is also found in France, taken there apparently by English immigrants; the usual French form is Talbert.
TALCOTTEnglish, Norman
Norman habitational name from Taillecourt in France.... [more]
TALLANTEnglish (British, ?), Norman, Irish
English (of Norman origin) occupational name for a tailor or nickname for a good swordsman, from taillant ‘cutting’, present participle of Old French tailler ‘to cut’ (Late Latin taliare, from talea ‘(plant) cutting’)... [more]
TALLONEnglish, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare Talbot) or as an independent byname... [more]
TURBEFIELDFrench, Norman
The name is a village in Normandy. Is documented in Gloucester Abbey in 1044.
TURNEYEnglish, Norman
Habitational name from places in France called Tournai, Tournay, or Tourny. All named with the pre-Roman personal name TURNUS and the locative suffix -acum.
VERDIERFrench, Norman, English
Occupational name for a forester. Derived from Old French verdier (from Late Latin viridarius, a derivative of viridis "green"). Also an occupational name for someone working in a garden or orchard, or a topographic name for someone living near one... [more]
WEASLEYNorman
Variant of WESLEY... [more]