German Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
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SEIDELGerman
From a diminutive of the given name SIEGFRIED.
SENFT (1)German
Occupational name for a mustard seller, from German Senf "mustard".
SENFT (2)German
Nickname for a helpful, kind person, from Old High German semfti meaning "soft, accommodating".
SHRIVERGerman
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SIEBERTGerman
Derived from the given name SIEGBERT.
SIEGEL (1)German
Occupational name for a maker of seals or signet rings, ultimately from Latin sigillum "seal".
SIEGEL (2)German
Derived from the diminutive of Germanic given names beginning with the element sigu meaning "victory".
SIEGERGerman
From the given name SIEGER.
SIEGERTGerman
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEKERTGerman (Rare)
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEMONGerman
Variant of SIMON.
SIMMONGerman
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Jewish
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONEITGerman
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONSEnglish, German
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SITZ (1)German
Derived from a given name beginning with the Germanic element sigu meaning "victory".
SITZ (2)German
Means "house owner", derived from Old High German siz "seat, domicile".
SOMMER (1)German, English
Means "summer", from Old High German sumar or Old English sumor meaning "summer". This was a nickname for a cheerful person, someone wgo lived in a sunny spot, or a farmer who had to pay taxes in the summer.
SOMMER (2)German
From Middle High German sumber or sommer meaning "basket, wickerwork, drum".
SONNENGerman
Means "sun" from Middle High German sunne. It probably denoted someone of cheerful temperament or a person who lived in a sunny area.
SORGGerman
Variant of SORGE.
SORGEGerman
Means "worry, care, anxiety" in German, from Old High German sorga.
SOUTHERSGerman
Possibly an Americanized form of SAUTER.
SPANNAGELGerman
Occupational name for a nailsmith, from Middle High German span nagel "connecting bolt".
SPECHTGerman
Means "woodpecker" in German.
SPELLMEYERGerman
Possibly from German spielen meaning "to play, to jest" combined with meyer meaning "village headman". Perhaps it referred to someone who was played or acted as the village headman.
SPITZGerman
Means "sharp" in German, indicating the original bearer lived near a pointed hill.
SPITZNAGELGerman
Means "sharp nail" in German, an occupational name for a nailsmith.
SPITZNOGLEGerman
Americanized form of SPITZNAGEL.
SPONAUGLEGerman
Americanized form of SPANNAGEL.
STARKEnglish, German
From a nickname meaning "strong, rigid", from Old English stearc or Old High German stark.
STAUSSGerman
Means "buttocks" from Middle High German stuz.
STEENLow German
Low German variant of STEIN.
STEFFENLow German, English
Derived from the given name STEPHEN.
STEINGerman, Jewish
From Old High German stein meaning "stone". It might indicate the original bearer lived near a prominent stone or worked as a stonecutter. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
STEINMANNGerman
Means "stone man" in German, used as a habitational name for a person who lived near a promineent stone or an occupational name for a stone worker.
STENGERGerman
Occupational name for a post maker, from Old High German stanga "pole".
STERN (2)German, Jewish
German cognate of STARR.
STEUBENGerman
Name for a dweller by a stump of a large tree, from Middle Low German stubbe "stub".
STIEBERGerman
Derived from Middle High German stiuben meaning "to run away". It may have been given as a nickname to a cowardly person or a thief.
STOPPELBEINGerman
Means "stump leg" from Middle Low German stoppel "stump" and bein "leg".
STRAUBGerman
From Old High German strub meaning "rough, unkempt".
STROBELGerman
Diminutive form of STRAUB.
STROHKIRCHGerman
Means "straw church" in German.
STROMANGerman
Means "straw man" in German, an occupational name for a seller of straw.
STUBERGerman
Occupational name for the owner of an inn, derived from Old High German stuba "room".
STÜCKGerman, Jewish
From Old High German stucki meaning "piece, part".
STUMPFGerman
Nickname for a short person or a topographic name someone who lived near a prominent stump, from Middle High German stumpf.
STURMGerman
Means "storm" in German, originally a nickname for an volatile person.
SUESSGerman
Variant of SÜß. A famous bearer was the American children's author Dr. Seuss (1904-1991), who was born Theodor Seuss Geisel.
SULZBACHGerman
Toponymic name from German places named Sulzbach meaning "salty stream", derived from Old High German sulza "salty water" and bah "stream".
SÜSSGerman
Variant of SÜß.
SÜßGerman
From Old High German suozi meaning "sweet".
SWANGOGerman
Americanized form of SCHWANGAU.
SWITZERGerman
Americanized form of SCHWEITZER.
TANGEMANGerman
Originally indicated a person from a place named Tange in northern Germany.
TANZERGerman
Means "dancer" in German, derived from Middle High German tanzen "to dance".
TAUBEGerman
From a nickname meaning meaning "dove" in German.
TEUFELGerman
From a nickname meaning "devil" in German, given to a mischievous person or one who was devil-like.
TIEDEMANNLow German
Derived from the given name TIEDEMANN.
TOBIASEnglish, German, Jewish
From the given name TOBIAS.
TOLKIENGerman
Derived from the Saxon Tollkühn meaning "foolhardy". A famous bearer was the English author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973).
TRITTENGerman
Originally denoted someone who lived by a set of steps, from Middle High German trit "step".
TRUMBAUERGerman
Possibly from Middle High German trame "rafter, frame" and bauer "peasant, neighbour".
TSCHIDAGerman
Possibly derived from a Slavic given name of unknown meaning.
UNKLEGerman
Possibly denoted a person from the town of Unkel in Rhineland Palantinate, Germany.
UNRUHGerman
Refers to a restless, fidgety, nervous person, from German unruhe meaning "unrest".
UNTERBRINKLow German
Means "dweller under the slope" from Old Low German undar "under" and brink "edge, slope".
VIETHGerman
From the given name VEIT.
VOGELGerman, Dutch
From Old High German and Old Dutch fogal meaning "bird". It was originally an occupational name for a bird catcher, or a nickname for a person who liked to sing.
VOGTGerman
Occupational name from Middle High German voget meaning "bailiff, lawyer", ultimately from Latin advocatus.
VOGTSGerman
Patronymic variant of VOGT.
VOIGTGerman
Variant of VOGT.
VOIGTSGerman
Patronymic variant of VOGT.
VOLKGerman
Derived from given names beginning with the Germanic element fulc meaning "people".
VOLL (2)German
Variant of VOLK.
VON BRANDTGerman
Means "from the area cleared by fire", from Middle High German brant.
VON ESSENGerman
Means "from Essen", a city in Germany, possibly a derivative of Old High German asc meaning "ash tree".
VON GRIMMELSHAUSENGerman
Means "from Grimmelshausen", a town in Germany. It is itself derived from Grimmel, of uncertain meaning, and hausen meaning "houses". A famous bearer was the German author Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen (1621-1676).
VON INGERSLEBENGerman
Means "from Ingersleben", a town in Germany, which means "INGE's village".
VONNEGUTGerman
Possibly from the Germanic vonn meaning "hunting track" and gut meaning "good". A famous bearer was the American author Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007).
VOSSGerman
From Middle Low German vos meaning "fox". It was originally a nickname for a clever person or a person with red hair.
VOßGerman
Variant of VOSS.
WAGNERGerman
From Middle High German wagener meaning "wagon maker, cartwright". This name was borne by the German composer Richard Wagner (1813-1883).
WAHNERGerman
Variant of WAGNER.
WALKENHORSTGerman
Possibly derived from a German place name Falkenhorst, from Falken meaning "falcons" and Horst meaning "thicket".
WALTEREnglish, German
Derived from the given name WALTER.
WALTHERGerman
From the given name WALTHER.
WALTZGerman
From a diminutive of the given name WALTHER.
WANG (2)German, Dutch
From Middle High German and Middle Dutch wange meaning "cheek", possibly a nickname for someone with round or rosy cheeks.
WANG (3)German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Old High German wang or Old Norse vangr meaning "grassy slope, meadow".
WAXWEILERGerman
Denoted a person from Waxweiler, a village in the Eifel region of Germany.
WEBERGerman
German cognate of WEAVER (1).
WECHSLERGerman, Jewish
Means "money changer, banker", from German wechseln "to exchange".
WEDEKINDGerman
From the given name WIDUKIND.
WEEBERGerman
German cognate of WEAVER (1).
WEGENERLow German
Low German variant of WAGNER.
WEGNERLow German
Low German variant of WAGNER.
WEHNERGerman
Variant of WAGNER.
WEHUNTGerman
Americanized form of German WIEGAND.
WEIGANDGerman
From the given name WIEGAND.
WEIMANNGerman
From German Wein meaning "wine", an occupational name for a wine seller or producer.
WEINERGerman
Variant of WAGNER.
WEISSGerman
From Middle High German wiz meaning "white". This was originally a nickname for a person with white hair or skin.
WEIßGerman
Variant of WEISS.
WELTERGerman
Derived from the given name WALTER.
WENDELGerman
Derived from the given name WENDEL.
WENDELLGerman
Derived from the given name WENDEL.
WERNERGerman
From the given name WERNER.
WERNHERGerman
From the given name WERNER.
WESTEnglish, German
Denoted a person who lived to the west of something, or who came from the west.
WETZELGerman
From the given name WENZEL.
WIECKGerman
Means "village, town", derived from Latin vicus.
WIEGANDGerman
From the given name WIEGAND.
WILDGRUBEGerman
From the name of a German town, derived from German wild "wild, untamed" and Grube "hollow, pit".
WINKLERGerman
Derived from Old High German winkil meaning "corner".
WINTEREnglish, German, Swedish
From Old English winter or Old High German wintar meaning "winter". This was a nickname for a person with a cold personality.
WIRNERGerman
From the given name WERNER.
WIRNHIERGerman
From the given name WERNER.
WIRTGerman
Variant of WIRTH.
WIRTHGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for an innkeeper, derived from German wirt meaning "host".
WOLFGerman, English
From Middle High German or Middle English wolf meaning "wolf", or else from a Germanic given name beginning with this element.
WOLTERGerman
From the given name WALTER.
WÖRNERGerman
From the given name WERNER.
WÖRNHÖRGerman
From the given name WERNER.
WRUCKGerman
From Middle Low German wrok meaning "cantankerous".
XYLANDERGerman
From Greek ξυλον (xylon) meaning "wood, forest" and ανδρος (andros) meaning "man". This surname was a Greek translation of German surnames of the same meaning.
YOUNTGerman (Anglicized)
Americanized form of JUNDT.
ZELLWEGERGerman (Swiss)
Originally denoted a person from the Appenzell region of Switzerland. The place name is derived from Latin abbatis cella meaning "estate of the abbot". A famous bearer is actress Renée Zellweger (1969-).
ZIMMERMANNGerman, Jewish
From the German word for "carpenter", derived from Middle High German zimber "timber, wood" and mann "man".