Swiss Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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PIOVENE Italian
From the name of the town of Piovene Rocchette in Veneto, Italy.
PIRAINO Italian
From the name of the town of Piraino on Sicily.
PISANI Italian
From Italian pisano, the name for an inhabitant of the city of Pisa, Italy. The city's name is of unknown meaning.
PITTALUGA Italian
Originally a nickname for somebody who steals grapes from vineyards. In the Genoese dialect pittà means "to pick" and uga means "grapes" (uva in Italian).
PLAMONDON French
Derived from French plat "flat" and mont "mountain", referring to someone who lived near a flat-topped mountain.
PLANCHE French
French form of PLANK.
PLANCK German
German variant of PLANK.
PLANK German, English
Means "plank", from Old French, itself from Late Latin planca. This could have referred to a person who lived by a plank bridge over a stream, someone who was thin, or a carpenter.
PLANQUE French
French form of PLANK.
PLETCHER German
Anglicized form of PLETSCHER.
PLETSCHER German
Possibly from the name of a field where cattle fodder was grown, from German Bletsch.
PLOURDE French
Possibly derived from French palourde, a type of a shellfish.
POGGI Italian
Variant of POGGIO.
POGGIO Italian
Means "hillock, small hill" in Italian, a derivative of Latin podium meaning "balcony, platform".
POIRIER French
Means "pear tree" in French, originally a nickname for someone who lived close to such a tree.
POLETTI Italian
From a diminutive of the given name PAOLO. This name is typical of northern and central Italy.
POLZIN German
From the name of a town in Pomerania, Poland (formerly part of Germany). In Polish it is called Połczyn.
PONTECORVO Italian, Jewish
From the name of a town in central Italy, home to an old Jewish community. The town's name is derived from Italian ponte "bridge" and curvo "curved".
PORCHER English, French
Means "swineherd" from Old French and Middle English porchier, from Latin porcus "pig".
PORSCHE German
Derived from the given name BORIS.
PORTELLI Italian
Diminutive form of PORTO.
PORTO Italian
Designated a person who lived near a harbour, from Italian porto, Latin portus.
PORTOGHESE Italian
Means "Portuguese" in Italian.
POTENZA Italian
From the name of the southern Italian city of Potenza, called Potentia in Latin, meaning "power, force".
POULIN French
Derived from Old French poule meaning "chicken". It was most likely used to denote a person who raised or sold poultry.
POZZI Italian
From Italian pozzo meaning "well, pit", derived from Latin puteus.
PRINZ German, Jewish
Means "prince", used as an ornamental name by Jews or as a nickname for someone who acted in a princely manner.
PROFETA Italian
From Italian profeta meaning "prophet". It probably came from a nickname indicating a person who wanted to predict the future. It is typical of southern Italy.
PROSDOCIMI Italian
From the given name Prosdocimo, Italian form of PROSDOCIMUS.
PROTZ German
From a nickname meaning "showy, pompous", derived from an old southern German word meaning "toad".
PROULX French
Derived from Old French preu meaning "valiant, brave".
PROVENZA Italian
From the name of the Provence region of southern France (in Italian Provenza). It is derived from Latin provincia "province", a territorial division.
PROVENZANO Italian
Variant of PROVENZA typical of southern Italy, namely Sicily and Calabria.
PUGLIESE Italian
From an adjectival derivative of Puglia, from Latin Apulia, a region of southeast Italy containing the boot heel and some of the coastline of the Adriatic Sea. It is a regional name for someone from that region.
QUARANTA Italian
Means "forty" in Italian.
QUATTROCCHI Italian
From Italian quattro meaning "four" and occhi meaning "eyes", a nickname for a person who wore glasses. It is usually found in Sicily.
RAGNO Italian
From a nickname meaning "spider" in Italian.
RAIMONDI Italian
Derived from the given name RAIMONDO.
RAIS Italian
Occupational name for the fisherman in charge of the boat, from Italian rais "captain", of Arabic origin. It is typical of Sicily and Sardinia.
RANA Italian, Spanish
Means "frog" in Italian and Spanish.
RANERI Italian
Derived from the Italian given name RANIERO.
RAO (2) Italian
Derived from the given name RAUL.
RAPALLINO Italian
From the name of the town of Rapallo near Genoa.
RAPP (2) German
From Middle High German raben meaning "raven", a nickname for a person with black hair.
RASCH German
German form of RASK.
RASKOB German
Variant of RASKOPF.
RASKOP German
Variant of RASKOPF.
RASKOPF German
Possibly from German rasch "quick" and Kopf "head".
RATTI Italian
From Italian ratto meaning "rat", originally denoting a sly individual.
RAVENNA Italian
From the name of the city of Ravenna in northern Italy, which is of uncertain origin, possibly Etruscan.
RAYNE English, French
Derived from a Germanic name that was short for longer names beginning with the element ragin meaning "advice, counsel".
Italian
Italian form of REY (1).
REGENBOGEN German, Jewish
From a German nickname meaning "rainbow".
REIER German
Variant of REIHER.
REIHER German
Means "heron" in German, a nickname for a person with long legs.
REIS German, Jewish
From Middle High German ris meaning "twig, branch, bush", denoting a person who lived in an overgrown area. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
RENAUD French
From the given name RENAUD.
RETTIG German
Derived from Middle High German retich, Middle Low German redik meaning "radish", an occupational name for a grower or seller of radishes.
REUTER (1) German
Fom Middle High German riute meaning "cleared land".
REUTER (2) German
From Middle High German riutœre meaning "highwayman, thief".
REY (1) English, Spanish, French, Catalan
Means "king" in Old French, Spanish and Catalan, ultimately from Latin rex (genitive regis), perhaps originally denoting someone who acted like a king.
REYER German
Variant of REIHER.
RICCHETTI Italian
Diminutive form of RICCI.
RICCI Italian
From Italian riccio meaning "curly", a nickname for someone with curly hair. It is ultimately from Latin ericius meaning "hedgehog".
RICHARD English, French, German, Dutch
From the given name RICHARD.
RICHELIEU French
From the name of the town of Richelieu, derived from French riche "wealthy" and lieu "place". The historic figure Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642), born Armand du Plessis, was so-called because he became the first Duke of Richelieu. He appears in Alexander Dumas' novel 'The Three Musketeers' (1844).
RICHTER German
Means "judge" in German, from Middle High German rihtære.
RIESE German, Jewish
Means "giant" in German.
RIGGI Italian
From the name of the Italian city of Reggio Calabria, from Latin Rhegium, of Greek origin.
RIGHI Italian
From the given name ARRIGO.
RINALDI Italian
Derived from the given name RINALDO.
RITTER German
From Middle High German riter meaning "rider, knight", a cognate of RYDER.
RIVA Italian
Means "bank, shore" in Italian, from Latin ripa, denoting one who lived by a river or a lake.
RIZZO Italian
Variant of RICCI.
ROBERT English, French, Dutch
From the given name ROBERT.
ROBUSTELLI Italian
From a nickname for a strong person, from Italian robusto "strong", from Latin robustus "firm, solid, oaken".
ROCCA Italian
Italian cognate of ROACH.
ROCCHI Italian
Derived from the given name ROCCO.
ROCCO Italian
Derived from the given name ROCCO.
ROCHE French
French cognate of ROACH.
ROMAGNA Italian
From the region of Romagna, on the Adriatic coast of Italy. It is derived from Latin Romania meaning "land of the Romans".
ROMANO (1) Italian
Derived from the given name ROMANO.
ROMANO (2) Italian
Denoted a person from the city of ROME, either a resident or someone who visited as a pilgrim. In Calabria it was also used to designate a person from New Rome, a name for Constantinople.
ROME French, English
English and French form of ROMANO (2).
ROMILLY English, French
Originally denoted a person who came from any of the various places in northern France called ROMILLY or from ROMILEY in England.
RONCALLI Italian
From the names of places like Ronco or Ronchi, quite common in northern Italy, derived from ronco meaning "cleared land, terraced land". It was the surname of Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (1881-1963), the pope John XXIII.
RONCHI Italian
From Italian places named Ronchi, derived from ronco meaning "cleared land, terraced land". It is most common in northern and central Italy.
ROSA Italian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan form of ROSE (1).
ROSE (1) English, French, German, Jewish
Means "rose" from Middle English, Old French and Middle High German rose, all from Latin rosa. All denote a person of a rosy complexion or a person who lived in an area abundant with roses. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental, from Yiddish רויז (roiz).
ROSENBERG German, Swedish, Jewish
Means "rose mountain" in German and Swedish. As a Swedish and Jewish name it is ornamental.
ROSENFELD German, Jewish
Means "field of roses" in German. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
ROSSI Italian
Derived from a nickname for a red-haired person, from Italian rosso, Latin russus meaning "red".
ROSSINI Italian
Diminutive form of ROSSI. A famous bearer was the Italian composer Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868).
ROT German, Jewish
Variant of ROTH.
ROTH German, Jewish
From Middle High German rot meaning "red". It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair.
ROTHBAUER German
From Old High German riuten "to clear land" and bur "peasant, farmer".
ROTHENBERG German, Jewish
From Middle High German rot meaning "red" and berg meaning "mountain". As a Jewish name it may be ornamental.
ROTOLO Italian
From the Italian word for a measure of weight, from southern Italian dialects, derived from Greek via Arabic.
ROUSSEAU French
Diminutive of ROUX. A famous bearer was the philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) whose ideas influenced the French Revolution.
ROUSSEL French
French form of RUSSELL.
ROUX French
Derived from Old French ros meaning "red", from Latin russus, a nickname for a red-haired person.
ROVIGATTI Italian
From the name of the city of Rovigo in northeastern Italy near Venice. It was called Rodigium in Latin, and is of unknown meaning.
ROYER French
From French roue meaning "wheel", ultimately from Latin rota, an occupational name for a wheelwright.
RUGGERI Italian
Derived from the given name RUGGERO.
RUGGIERO Italian
From the given name RUGGIERO.
RUSSO Italian
Variant of ROSSI.
RUSTICI Italian
From Italian rustico meaning "rustic, rural".
RUZZIER Italian
From a dialectal variant of RUGGIERO. It is typical of northeastern Italy, the area around Trieste.
RYER German (Anglicized)
Possibly an Americanized form of REIHER.
SABBADIN Italian
From a nickname from Italian sabbato "Saturday", a name for one born on that day of the week.
SACCO Italian
Occupational name for a maker of sacks, from Italian sacco, Latin saccus.
SACHS German
Originally indicated a person from Saxony (German Sachsen). The region was named for the Germanic tribe of the Saxons, ultimately derived from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SALA Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Romanian
Occupational name for a worker at a manor house, from the Romance word sala meaning "hall, large room", of Germanic origin.
SALLER (1) German
Originally denoted a person from the town of Sallern in Bavaria, possibly from a Celtic element meaning "stream".
SALLER (2) German
Denoted a person who lived by a prominent sallow tree, from Middle High German salhe "sallow tree".
SALMON English, French
Derived from the given name SOLOMON.
SALOMON French, Jewish
Derived from the given name SALOMON.
SALUCCI Italian
From Italian sale meaning "salt".
SALVAGGI Italian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SALVATICI Italian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SALVI Italian
From the given name SALVO or SALVIO.
SALZWEDEL German
Originally denoted a person from Salzwedel, Germany, which is of Old Saxon origin meaning "salt ford".
SAMSON English, French
Derived from the given name SAMSON.
SAMUEL English, French, German, Jewish
Derived from the given name SAMUEL.
SANDER German, Danish
Derived from the given name ALEXANDER.
SANNA Italian
From Italian sanna or zanna meaning "tusk, fang", a nickname for a person with a protruding tooth.
SANSONE Italian
Derived from the given name SANSONE.
SANTINI Italian
Diminutive form of SANTO.
SANTO Italian
Italian form of SANTOS.
SANTORO Italian
Means "all saint's day" in Italian, a nickname for one born on that day.
SAPIENTI Italian
Means "wise, learned" in Italian.
SARNO Italian
Originally denoted a person from Sarno in Italy, named for the Sarno River (called Sarnus in Latin).
SARTI Italian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTINI Italian
Diminutive form of SARTO.
SARTO Italian
Occupational name meaning "tailor" in Italian, from Latin sartor, from sarcire meaning "to mend".
SARTOR Italian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTORE Italian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTRE French
French cognate of SARTO.
SAUBER German
Means "clean, tidy" in German.
SAULT French
French cognate of SOTO.
SAUTER German
Occupational name for a cobbler, from Latin sutor "sewer, cobbler".
SAUVAGE French
French form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEAU French
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEON French
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEOT French
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAUVETERRE French
From the name of various towns in France, derived from French sauve "safe" and terre "land".
SAVATIER French
From Old French savatier "shoemaker", derived from savate "shoe", of uncertain ultimate origin.
SAVONA Italian
From the name of the city of Savona in northern Italy, called Savo by the Romans, of uncertain meaning.
SCARPA Italian
Means "shoemaker" from Italian scarpa meaning "shoe".
SCARSI Italian
Nickname for a poor or miserly person, from Italian scarso "scarce, scant".
SCAVO Italian
Means "serf, slave", from Old Sicilian scavu.
SCHÄFER German
From Old High German scaphare meaning "shepherd".
SCHEER German
Variant of SCHERER.
SCHENCK German
Variant of SCHENK.
SCHENK German, Dutch
From Middle High German, Middle Dutch schenke meaning "wine server" (from Old High German scenken "to pour out").
SCHERER German
Occupational name for a cutter of cloth or a sheep-shearer, from Old High German skeran "to cut".
SCHINDLER German
Occupational name for a roof tiler, from Middle High German schindel "shingle". A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
SCHIRMER German
Means "fencer, fencing master", from Old High German skirmen meaning "to defend".
SCHLENDER German
From Middle High German slinderen "to dawdle" or Middle Low German slinden "to swallow, eat".
SCHLIMME German
From German schlimm "bad, crooked, awry".
SCHLOSSER German
Occupational name for a locksmith, derived from Old High German sloz meaning "lock".
SCHMELING German
From Middle Low German smal meaning "small, slender".
SCHMID German
Variant of SCHMIDT.
SCHMIDT German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German smit "smith, metalworker", a cognate of SMITH.
SCHMITZ German
Variant of SCHMIDT, originating in the Rhine area in western Germany.
SCHNEIDER German, Jewish
From German schneider or Yiddish shnayder, making it a cognate of SNYDER.
SCHNELL German
German cognate of SNELL.
SCHNOOR German
Variant of SCHNUR.
SCHNUR German, Jewish
From Old High German snuor meaning "rope, cord", an occupational name for a maker of rope.
SCHÖTTMER German
Originally indicated a person from Schötmar, Germany (now part of the city of Bad Salzuflen in North Rhine-Westphalia).
SCHRECK German
From Middle High German schrecken meaning "to frighten, to scare".
SCHREIBER German
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SCHREIER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a town crier, from Old High German scrian meaning "to shout, to yell".
SCHRÖTER German
Means "beer-porter, wine-porter" in German, an occupational name for a carrier of wine or beer barrels.
SCHUCHARDT German
From Middle High German schuochwürte meaning "shoemaker, cobbler".
SCHUHMACHER German
From the Middle High German occupational name schuochmacher meaning "shoemaker".
SCHULER German
Means "scholar, student" in German, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school".
SCHULTHEIß German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German schultheiße meaning "mayor, judge".
SCHUSTER German
Means "shoemaker, cobbler", from Middle High German schuoch "shoe" and suter, from Latin sutor "sewer, cobbler".
SCHÜTTMANN German
Means "watchman, guard" from Middle High German schützen "to protect".
SCHWANGAU German
From the name of a town in southern Germany, possibly related to German Schwan meaning "swan".
SCHWARZ German, Jewish
Means "black" in German, from Old High German swarz. It originally described a person with black hair or a dark complexion.
SCHWARZENBERG German
Means "black mountain" in German.
SCHWARZENEGGER German
From a place name, derived from Old High German swarz meaning "black" and ecka meaning "edge, corner". A famous bearer of this name is actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger (1947-).
SCHWEITZER German
Indicated a person from Switzerland (see SCHWEIZ).
SCHWENKE (1) German
Derived from Middle High German swenken meaning "to swing".
SCHWENKE (2) German
From a given name, a Low German diminutive of SWANHILD.
SCHWINGHAMMER German
Occupational name for a blacksmith, literally meaning "swing hammer" in German.
SCIACCA Italian
Originally denoted someone from Sciacca, Sicily, Italy, which is of uncertain origin.
SCIARRA Italian
From Sicilian sciarra meaning "quarrel, dispute", originally a nickname for a quarrelsome person.
SCOLA Italian
From Italian scuola meaning "school".
SCORDATO Italian
Means "forgotten, left behind" in Italian.
SCOTTI Italian
From the medieval given name Francescotto, a diminutive of FRANCESCO.
SEBASTIANI Italian
From the given name SEBASTIANO.
SEEGER German
From the given name SIEGER.
SEGAL (2) French
Occupational name for a grower or seller of rye, from Old French, from Latin secale "rye".
SEGRETI Italian
From Italian segreto meaning "secret", a nickname for a confidant.
SEIDEL German
From a diminutive of the given name SIEGFRIED.
SELVAGGIO Italian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SENFT (1) German
Occupational name for a mustard seller, from German Senf "mustard".
SENFT (2) German
Nickname for a helpful, kind person, from Old High German semfti meaning "soft, accommodating".
SERAFIN Polish, Italian
Derived from the given name SERAFIN or SERAFINO.
SERAFINI Italian
Derived from the given name SERAFINO.
SERGEANT English, French
Occupational name derived from Old French sergent meaning "servant", ultimately from Latin servire "to serve".
SERPICO Italian
From a nickname derived from Italian serpe "serpent, reptile".
SESSA Italian
Originally indicated a person from from Sessa or Sessa Cilento, Italy (from Latin Suessa, of uncertain meaning).
SÉVERIN French
Derived from the given name SÉVERIN.
SGRO Italian
Nickname for a curly-haired person, from Greek σγουρος (sgouros) meaning "curly".
SHRIVER German
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SIEBERT German
Derived from the given name SIEGBERT.
SIEGEL (1) German
Occupational name for a maker of seals or signet rings, ultimately from Latin sigillum "seal".
SIEGEL (2) German
Derived from the diminutive of Germanic given names beginning with the element sigu meaning "victory".
SIEGER German
From the given name SIEGER.
SIEGERT German
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEKERT German (Rare)
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEMON German
Variant of SIMON.
SIENA Italian
Indicated a person from Siena in Italy, which was named after the Gaulish tribe of the Senones.
SILVESTRI Italian
Derived from the given name SILVESTER.
SIMMON German
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMON English, French, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Jewish
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONEIT German
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONS English, German
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SINAGRA (1) Italian
Originally denoted a person from Sinagra on Sicily, possibly derived from Latin sinus "inlet" and ager "field".
SINAGRA (2) Italian
Derived from the given name Senagora, an Italian form of XENAGORAS.
SITZ (1) German
Derived from a given name beginning with the Germanic element sigu meaning "victory".
SITZ (2) German
Means "house owner", derived from Old High German siz "seat, domicile".
SOLDATI Italian
From Italian soldato meaning "soldier", ultimately from Latin solidus, a type of Roman coin.
SOMMA Italian
From the names of Italian places like Somma Lombardo or Somma Vesuviana, derived from Latin summa meaning "summit".
SOMMER (1) German, English
Means "summer", from Old High German sumar or Old English sumor. This was a nickname for a cheerful person, someone who lived in a sunny spot, or a farmer who had to pay taxes in the summer.
SOMMER (2) German
From Middle High German sumber or sommer meaning "basket, wickerwork, drum".
SONNEN German
Means "sun" from Middle High German sunne. It probably denoted someone of cheerful temperament or a person who lived in a sunny area.
SORDI Italian
From Italian sordo meaning "deaf", from Latin surdus.
SORG German
Variant of SORGE.
SORGE German
Means "worry, care, anxiety" in German, from Old High German sorga.
SORIANO Italian
From place names such as Soriano Calabro and Soriano nel Cimino. It is typical of southern Italy.
SORRENTINO Italian
Derived from the town of Sorrento near Naples, called Surrentum in Latin, of unknown meaning.
SOUCY French
Originally denoted someone from French towns by this name in Aisne or Yonne, both derived from the Latin name Suciacum.
SOURD French
French cognate of SORDI.
SOUTHERS German
Possibly an Americanized form of SAUTER.
SPADA Italian
Occupational name for an armourer or swordsman, from Italian spada "sword", Latin spatha.
SPANNAGEL German
Occupational name for a nailsmith, from Middle High German span nagel "connecting bolt".
SPARACELLO Italian
From Sicilian sparaciu meaning "asparagus", an occupational name for an asparagus seller or grower.
SPECHT German
Means "woodpecker" in German.
SPELLMEYER German
Possibly from German spielen meaning "to play, to jest" combined with meyer meaning "village headman". Perhaps it referred to someone who was played or acted as the village headman.
SPEZIALE Italian
Means "grocer" in Italian, derived from Latin speciarius "spice seller".
SPINI Italian
Denoted a person who lived near thorn bushes, from Italian spina "thorn, spine", from Latin.
SPITZ German
Means "sharp" in German, indicating the original bearer lived near a pointed hill.
SPITZNAGEL German
Means "sharp nail" in German, an occupational name for a nailsmith.
SPITZNOGLE German
Americanized form of SPITZNAGEL.
SPONAUGLE German
Americanized form of SPANNAGEL.
STABILE Italian
From the medieval Italian given name Stabile meaning "stable, firm".
STABLUM Italian
Northern Italian name derived from Latin stabulum meaning "stable".
STARK English, German
From a nickname meaning "strong, rigid", from Old English stearc or Old High German stark.
STAUSS German
Means "buttocks" from Middle High German stuz.
STEIN German, Jewish
From Old High German stein meaning "stone". It might indicate the original bearer lived near a prominent stone or worked as a stonecutter. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
STEINMANN German
Means "stone man" in German, used as a habitational name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or an occupational name for a stone worker.
STENGER German
Occupational name for a post maker, from Old High German stanga "pole".
STERN (2) German, Jewish
German cognate of STARR.
STEUBE German
Variant of STEUBEN.
STEUBEN German
Name for a dweller by a stump of a large tree, from Middle Low German stubbe "stub".
STIEBER German
Derived from Middle High German stiuben meaning "to run away". It may have been given as a nickname to a cowardly person or a thief.
STILO Italian
Derived from the name of the town of Stilo in southern Italy. It is possibly derived from Greek στυλος (stylos) meaning "column, pillar".
ST MARTIN French
From a place named for Saint MARTIN.
STOPPELBEIN German
Means "stump leg" from Middle Low German stoppel "stump" and bein "leg".
ST PIERRE French
From a French place named for Saint PETER.
STRAUB German
From Old High German strub meaning "rough, unkempt".
STROBEL German
Diminutive form of STRAUB.
STROHKIRCH German
Means "straw church" in German.
STROMAN German
Means "straw man" in German, an occupational name for a seller of straw.
STUBER German
Occupational name for the owner of an inn, derived from Old High German stuba "room".
STÜCK German, Jewish
From Old High German stucki meaning "piece, part".
STUMPF German
Nickname for a short person or a topographic name someone who lived near a prominent stump, from Middle High German stumpf.
STURM German
Means "storm" in German, originally a nickname for a volatile person.