Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is Marusero.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AKASHI Japanese
From Japanese 明 (aka) meaning "bright" and 石 (shi) meaning "stone".
AMANO Japanese
From Japanese 天 (ama) meaning "heaven, sky" and 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
APPELMAN Dutch
Occupational name from Middle Dutch apelmanger "apple seller".
AQUILA Italian
Habitational name from L'Aquila in Abruzzo or from any of various smaller places called Aquila.
BALLERINI Italian
Occupational name or nickname for a dancer, Italian ballerino, an agent derivative of ballare "to dance".
BELKIN Russian
Patronymic from the nickname Belka meaning "squirrel" (a derivative of bely "white", referring to the animal's white stomach).
BETANCES Spanish, American (Hispanic)
Unexplained; probably related to Betanzos, the name of a town near A Coruña in Galicia.
BLADE English
Metonymic occupational name for a cutler, from Middle English blade "cutting edge, sword".
BREED English
Habitational name from any of various minor places, for example Brede in Sussex, named with Old English brǣdu "breadth, broad place" (a derivative of brād "broad").
CANAVAN Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ceanndubháin "descendant of Ceanndubhán", a byname meaning "little black-headed one", from ceann "head" combined with dubh "black" and the diminutive suffix -án.
CHAI Chinese
From Chinese 柴 (chái) meaning "firewood, brushwood".
CHASE French
Topographic name for someone who lived in or by a house, probably the occupier of the most distinguished house in the village, from a southern derivative of Latin casa "hut, cottage, cabin".
CUNNINGHAM Irish
Surname adopted from Scottish by bearers of Gaelic Ó Cuinneagáin "descendant of Cuinneagán", a personal name from a double diminutive of the Old Irish personal name Conn meaning "leader, chief".
DAMIAN French, Spanish, Italian, Czech, Slovak, Polish
From the medieval personal name Damian, Greek Damianos (from damazein "to subdue"). St. Damian was an early Christian saint martyred in Cilicia in ad 303 under the emperor Domitian, together with his brother Cosmas... [more]
DAMON English, Scottish
From the personal name Damon, from a classical Greek name, a derivative of damān "to kill". Compare Damian.
DATE Japanese
From Japanese 伊 (da) meaning "this" and 達 (te) meaning "achieve, arrive at, intelligent".
DODGEN English
From a pet form of Dogge (see Dodge).
DODGSON English
Patronymic form of Dodge.
ELLENS English
Metronymic from Ellen (1).
FALKNER English
Variant spelling of Faulkner.
FALKNER German
Occupational name for a falconer, Middle High German vakenoere. In medieval times falconry was a sport practised only by the nobility; it was the task of the falconer to look after the birds and train young ones.
FELICIANO Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From a medieval personal name (Latin Felicianus, a derivative of Felix). The name was borne by a number of early saints, most notably a 3rd-century bishop of Foligno and apostle of Umbria.
FELL English, German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a furrier, from Middle English fell, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel, all of which mean "skin, hide, pelt". Yiddish fel refers to untanned hide, in contrast to pelts "tanned hide" (see Pilcher).
FELLER English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative of Middle English fell, Middle Low German, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel "hide, pelt". See also Fell.
FELLER German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Feld(e) or Feld(a) in Hesse.
FEUER Jewish
Ornamental name from modern German Feuer "fire".
FEUER German
Metonymic occupational name for a stoker in a smithy or public baths, or nickname for someone with red hair or a fiery temper, from Middle High German viur "fire".
FILS French
From fils "son", used to identify the younger of two bearers of the same personal name in a family.
FLAM Jewish
Ornamental name from Yiddish flam "flame".
FREE English
Nickname or status name from Old English frēo "free(-born)", i.e. not a serf.
FUCCI Italian
From the plural of Fuccio, a short form of any of various personal names with a root ending in -f (as for example Rodolfo, Gandolfo) to which has been attached the hypocoristic suffix -uccio, or alternatively from a reduced form of a personal name such as Fantuccio, Feduccio.
FUJIMORI Japanese
From Japanese 藤 (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and 森 (mori) meaning "forest".
FUJINAKA Japanese
From Japanese 藤 (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and 中 (naka) meaning "middle".
GOLD Jewish
Ornamental name from modern German Gold, Yiddish gold "gold". In North America it is often a reduced form of one of the many compound ornamental names of which Gold is the first element.
GOLD English
From an Old English personal name Golda (or the feminine Golde), which persisted into the Middle Ages as a personal name. The name was in part a byname from gold "gold", and in part a short form of the various compound names with this first element.
HABERLAND German
Topographic name from Middle High German haber(e) "oats" and land "land", or a habitational name from any of various places so called.
HACKNEY English, Scottish
Habitational name from Hackney in Greater London, named from an Old English personal name Haca (genitive Hacan) combined with ēg "island, dry ground in marshland".
HACKNEY English, Scottish
From Middle English hakenei (Old French haquenée), an ambling horse, especially one considered suitable for women to ride; perhaps therefore a metonymic occupational name for a stablehand... [more]
HAMAGUCHI Japanese
From Japanese 浜 (hama) meaning "beach, seashore" and 口 (kuchi) meaning "mouth, entrance".
HARLACHER German
Habitational name for someone from Ober- or Unter-Harlachen, near Überlingen.
HODGE English
Nickname from Middle English hodge "hog", which occurs as a dialect variant of hogge, for example in Cheshire place names.
HOSHI Japanese
From Japanese 星 (hoshi) meaning "star".
HURST German
Topographic name from Middle High German hurst "woodland, thicket".
IDA Japanese
From Japanese 井 (i) meaning "well, mine shaft, pit" and 田 (da) meaning "field, rice paddy".
JULES French
From a personal name (Latin Julius). The name was borne in the Middle Ages in honor of various minor Christian saints.
JULES English
Patronymic or metronymic from a short form of Julian.
JURADO Spanish, Portuguese
Occupational name for any of various officials who had to take an oath that they would perform their duty properly, from jurado "sworn", past participle of jurar "to swear" (Latin iurare).
KAKI Japanese
From Japanese 柿 (kaki) meaning "persimmon".
KAKIHARA Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese 柿 (kaki) meaning "persimmon" and 原 (hara) meaning "field, plain". A notable bearer of this surname is voice actor Tetsuya Kakihara (柿原 徹也 Kakihara Tetsuya, 1982-).
KAKITA Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese 柿 (kaki) meaning "persimmon" and 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
KAZAMA Japanese
From Japanese 風 (kaza) meaning "wind" and 間 (ma) meaning "space, room".
KAZE Japanese
From Japanese 風 (kaze) meaning "wind".
KISHIMOTO Japanese
From Japanese 岸 (kishi) meaning "bank, shore" and 本 (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
KONDOU Japanese
From Japanese 近 (kon) meaning "near, close" and 藤 (dou) meaning "wisteria". The latter character could indicate a connection to the Fujiwara clan.
LANCER Jewish
Ornamental name from German Lanze "lance, spear" combined with the agent suffix -er.
LIEB German
From a short form of the various compound Slavic personal names formed with lubo- "love" as the first element.
LINDBECK Swedish
Ornamental name composed of the elements lind "lime tree" and bäck "stream".
LÖWENSTEIN German
Habitational name from any of several places called Löwenstein.
LUCIUS Dutch
From the personal name Lucius (Latin Lucius, an ancient Roman personal name probably derived from lux "light", genitive lucis).
MARK English, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
MARKER German
Status name for someone who lived on an area of land that was marked off from the village land or woodland, Middle High German merkære.
MATSUKI Japanese
From Japanese 松 (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree" and 木 (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
MATSUNO Japanese
From Japanese 松 (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree" and 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
MCCARLEY Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Fhearghaile "son of Fearghal", a personal name meaning "valiant man".
MISAKI Japanese
From Japanese 三 (mi) meaning "three" and 崎 (saki) meaning "cape, peninsula".
MIYATA Japanese
From Japanese 宮 (miya) meaning "temple, shrine, palace" and 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
MIZUTA Japanese
From Japanese 水 (mizu) meaning "water" and 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
MIZUTANI Japanese
From Japanese 水 (mizu) meaning "water" and 谷 (tani) meaning "valley".
NATAL Portuguese, Spanish
From the personal name Natal (from Latin Natalis), bestowed on someone born at Christmas or with reference to the Marian epithet María del Natal.
NATIVIDAD Spanish
From the personal name Natividad "nativity, Christmas", from Latin nativitas "birth", genitive nativitatis, usually bestowed with reference to the Marian epithet María de la Natividad... [more]
PAGÁN Spanish
Castilianized spelling of Catalan Pagà, from the Late Latin personal name Paganus, which originally meant "dweller in an outlying village" (see Paine).
PHILSON English
Patronymic from Phil, a short form of the personal name Philip.
PILCH English
From Middle English pilch, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of pilches or a nickname for a habitual wearer of these. A pilch (from Late Latin pellicia, a derivative of pellis "skin, hide") was a kind of coarse leather garment with the hair or fur still on it.
PILCHER English
Occupational name for a maker or seller of pilches, from an agent derivative of Pilch. In early 17th-century English, pilcher was a popular term of abuse, being confused or punningly associated with the unrelated verb pilch "to steal" and with the unrelated noun pilchard, a kind of fish.
PLATA Spanish
Byname from plata "silver".
PLATA Spanish
Habitational name from places in Toledo and Cáceres provinces named Plata, or various places named La Plata.
POST Low German, Danish, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived near a post or pole (Middle Low German, Middle Dutch post, from Latin postis), presumably one of some significance, e.g. serving as a landmark or boundary, or a habitational name from any of several places in northern Germany called Post, probably from this word.
QING Chinese
From Chinese 青 (qīng) meaning "blue, green, young".
RICHMOND English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places so named, in northern France as well as in England. These are named with the Old French elements riche "rich, splendid" and mont "hill"... [more]
RIN Japanese
From Japanese 林 (rin) meaning "forest".
RITZ German
From a short form of the personal name Rizo, itself derived in part from Richard and in part from Heinrich (see Henry).
RUTGERS Dutch
Patronymic from the Germanic personal name Rutger (see Roger).
SANADA Japanese
From Japanese 真 (sana) meaning "real, genuine" and 田 (da) meaning "field, rice paddy".
SEITZER German
Variant of Seitz.
SHE Chinese
From Chinese 佘 (shé), which is of unknown significance.
SHIMONO Japanese
From Japanese 下 (shimo) meaning "under, below" and 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
SZOT Polish
Nickname for a fish seller with a bad reputation, from szot "bad herring".
TAKAISHI Japanese
From Japanese 高 (taka) meaning "tall, high" and 石 (ishi) meaning "stone".
TOMLIN English
From a pet form of Tom, a short form of the personal name Thomas.
TRUMP English
Metonymic occupational name for a trumpeter, from Middle English trumpe "trumpet".
TRUMP German
Metonymic occupational name for a drummer, from Middle High German trumpe "drum".
TSAI Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese variant of Chai.
VALE Galician, Aragonese
Topographic name from val "valley", or habitational name from any of the places named with this word.
VALIENTE Spanish
From a nickname based on valiente "brave".
WAHL German, Jewish
From Middle High German Walhe, Walch "foreigner from a Romance country", hence a nickname for someone from Italy or France, etc. This surname is also established in Sweden.
WIND English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pathway, alleyway, or road, Old English (ge)wind (from windan "to go").
WREN English
Nickname from the bird, Middle English wrenne, probably in reference to its small size.
YOSHINO Japanese
From Japanese 吉 (yoshi) meaning "lucky, good" and 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness".