Belgian Submitted Surnames

Belgian names are spoken in the country of Belgium in western Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABOUTFrench
It is a french surname that comes from the french word 'about', meaning "an extremity of a metallic or wooden element or piece." This surname is notably born by the French novelist Edmond François Valentin About... [more]
ABREOFrench, Italian
Abreo or its variant Abreu comes from the French Alfred (alf = Elf; fred = conseil). The meaning is wise counselor.... [more]
ABRESCHGerman, Dutch, Jewish
From a pet form of the Biblical name Abraham.
ACHARDFrench
From the given name Achard.
AIKMANDutch, English, Scottish
Originally a surname or a nickname meaning oak man.
ALARIEFrench, French (Quebec)
French: reflex of the Visigothic personal name Alaric, which is composed of Germanic elements meaning ‘all power’. This form was established in Quebec from 1681.
ALBINETFrench
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Albinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name Albin.... [more]
ALLEMANDFrench
Means "Germany" in French.
ALLEYEnglish, French (Anglicized)
From a Middle English personal name, Alli, Alleye, as forms such as Johannes filius Alli (Norfolk, 1205) make clear. This is of Scandinavian origin, cognate with Old Danish Alli, Old Swedish Alle... [more]
ALNEMYFlemish
Only know relation claims birth in East Flanders. Arabic speakers believe it may be of Syrian or Saudi Arabian origin.
ALPERTEnglish, Jewish, German, Dutch
A variant of the Jewish surname Heilprin or Halpern. In German and Dutch usage, it is derived from the given name Albert. One famous bearer is Richard Alpert from the ABC TV show LOST.
AMAURYFrench
From the given name Amaury... [more]
AMSTERDAMDutch
Location surname from the Netherlands capital city of Amsterdam. Well known bearer is comedic actor Morey Amsterdam (1908-1996) of 'The Dick Van Dyke Show'.
ANOUILHFrench
From Catalan anull, meaning "slow worm". It is originally a nickname given to a spineless and slow person. The French author Jean Anouilh is a famous bearer of this surname.
ANTOINEFrench
From the given name Antoine.
APPELGerman, Dutch, Jewish, Low German, Medieval Dutch, Yiddish
1. German: from the personal name Appel, a pet form of Apprecht (common especially in Thuringia and Franconia), itself a variant of Albrecht. ... [more]
APPELMANDutch
Occupational name from Middle Dutch apelmanger "apple seller".
ARABIEFrench
Ethnic name denoting someone from Arabia or an Arabic-speaking person.
ARAGONSpanish, Catalan, French
A surname and an autonomous community of Spain.
ARCHEAMBEAUFrench
The name Archambeau is derived from the Latin personal name 'Arcambaldus'. In turn the name 'Arcambaldus', is derived from the Germanic word 'Ercan', which means precious in Germanic, and 'bald', meaning bold and daring.... [more]
ARMUIERFrench
French for "armorer."
AROUETFrench
A famous bearer was French philosopher Voltaire (1694-1778), whose birth name was François-Marie Arouet.
ARQUETTEFrench
From arquet meaning "little bow" or "little arch" (diminutive of arche, from Latin arcus). It was originally an occupational name for an archer, but the French word arquet(te) is also found in the sense 'market trader' (originally, perhaps, one with a stall underneath an arch)... [more]
ATELIERFrench, English
From the French atelier meaning "workshop," referring to the workplace of an artist in the fine or decorative arts, particularly during the Middle Ages and into the 19th century.
ATENFrisian, Dutch
The Frisian name Aten means "Noble Wolf". The name was probably given to lesser lords. As noble would mean nobility. As wolf was always a symbol of a warrior, or hunter. Usually Nobles who were also warriors, were lesser lords... [more]
AUBINFrench
From the French given name Aubin.
AUBINEFrench (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French feminine given name Aubine, which was the French form of Albina. But in other words, you could also say that Aubine was the feminine form of Aubin.
AUBINETFrench (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Aubinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name Aubin.... [more]
AUBUCHONFrench (Modern, ?)
The Aubuchon name is French, but of uncertain origin. It is probably from the patronymic prefix au + buchon, a dialect term for a woodcutter (Standard French bûcheron).
AUCLAIRFrench
Patronymic from the personal name Clair or the nickname Leclair (‘the cheerful one’): (fils) à Leclair ‘(son) of Leclair’. It has also absorbed cases of Auclerc (from LeClerc).
AUDELINFrench
Variant of ODELIN, which is not to be confused with ODELÍN as it is Spanish while the other one is French, though they could have similar origins in name.
AUDETFrench
Southern French nickname from Gascon dialect audet "bird", variant of standard Occitan ausèl (modern French oiseau).
AUKERMANDutch
Americanized form of Dutch Ackerman. This was a frequent name in New Netherland in the 17th century.
AXDutch
originally French, used to be de Ax, meaning "from Ax", several possible places called Ax or Aix or variants.
BAACKNorth Frisian, Dutch
Either from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name Baldeke (a short form of any of the compound names with the first element bald ‘bold’, for example Baldewin) or from Middle Low German baec, bake ‘pork’, ‘bacon’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a butcher or pig farmer.
BABELFrench
Either (i) from the medieval French personal name Babel, apparently adopted from that of St Babylas, a 3rd-century Christian patriarch of Antioch, the origins of which are uncertain; or (ii) an invented Jewish name based on German or Polish Babel "Babylon".
BACONEnglish, French, Norman
An occupational surname for someone who sold pork, from Middle English and Old French bacun or bacon, meaning 'bacon', which is ultimately of Germanic origin. Can also be derived from the Germanic given names Baco, Bacco, or Bahho, from the root bag-, meaning 'to fight'... [more]
BAINScottish, French, English
Nickname for a hospitable person from northern Middle English beyn, bayn meaning "welcoming", "friendly".... [more]
BARBEFrench
Nickname for someone with a beard, Old French barbe (Latin barba).
BARBEFrench
From the given name BARBE.
BARBINFrench
Diminutive of BARBE.
BARILFrench
During the middle ages, when people were named after their given job, Baril was what winemakers and brewers were named. Baril simply means "Barrel" or "Keg"
BARNETTEEnglish, French (?)
Variant of Bernet and perhaps also a variant of English Barnett, under French influence.
BARNOItalian, Ukrainian, French, Ancient Aramaic, Russian
The surname Barno was first found in the north of Italy, especially in Tuscany. The name occasionally appears in the south, usually in forms which end in "o," but the northern forms ending in "i" are much more common... [more]
BARONEnglish, French
From the title of nobility, derived from Middle English & Old French baron (ultimately of Germanic origin). Instead of referring to someone of rank, this surname referred to a service in a baronial household or a peasant with ideas above their station... [more]
BARREAUFrench
Possibly a variant of Barreur, an agent derivative of barrer ‘to bar’, ‘to close or block off’, hence possibly an occupational name for a jailer or doorkeeper.
BARRIEREFrench
Occupational name for a gatekeeper, from Old French barier.
BARRINEAUFrench
The history of the Barrineau family goes back to the Medieval landscape of northern France, to that coastal region known as Normandy. Barrineau is a habitation name, derived from the place name Barrault, in Normandy.... [more]
BARZELAIJDutch, Jewish
Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Barzilai via Barzelay. Also compare Barzilaij. This name is found exclusively in the Dutch-Jewish community, and is considered quite rare: there were only 6 bearers in 1947 and less than 5 bearers in 2007.
BARZILAIJDutch, Jewish
Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Barzilai via Barzilay. This name is found exclusively in the Dutch-Jewish community, and is considered quite rare: there were only 112 bearers in 1947 and only 51 bearers in 2007.
BAUDELAIREFrench
A French surname, coming from the word "baudelaire", which is a short, broad, and curved sword used in heraldry.
BAUDRICFrench (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French given name Baudric, which was a variant form of Baldéric, the French form of Baldric.
BAUDRYFrench
Derived from the medieval French given name Baudry, which was a variant form of Baudric, a given name that itself was a variant form of Baldéric (see Baldric). A known bearer of this surname was the French painter Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry (1828-1886).
BAUMFREEDutch, American, African American
This name is clearly derived from Sojourner Truth, a former African-American slave who was born as Isabella Bomefree (but at some point the surname was changed to the more German-looking Baumfree). Although Sojourner's original owners - James and Elizabeth Bomefree/Baumfree - were apparently of Dutch descent, it is questionable whether the surname is really of Dutch origin... [more]
BAYEnglish, French, Dutch
Derived from Middle English and Old French bay, bai and Middle Dutch bay, all meaning "reddish brown". It was originally a nickname for someone with a hair color similar to that.
BEAUCHAMPEnglish, French
From the Old French "beau, bel" meaning "fair" and "lovely" and "champ(s)" meaning "field" or "plain." It is the name of several places in France. It is also the surname of the Beauchamp Family in the hit series Witches of East End.
BEAUFAYFrench (Rare)
In most cases, this surname is a locational surname that most likely took its name from the village of Beaufay, which is nowadays located in the Sarthe department of France. The village was called Bello Faeto, Bellofaido and Belfaidus during the Early Middle Ages, ultimately deriving its name from Latin bellus fagus (or bellum fagetum) meaning "beautiful beech tree(s)" or "beautiful beech woodland"... [more]
BEAUFOYFrench (Anglicized, Rare), English (Rare)
Anglicized form of Beaufay. Known bearers of this surname include the English astronomer and physicist Mark Beaufoy (1764-1827) and the British screenwriter Simon Beaufoy (b. 1967).
BEAUNEFrench
Refers to Beaune, France.... [more]
BEAUREGARDFrench
Habitational name from any of various places in France named Beauregard for their fine view or fine aspect, for example in Ain, Dordogne, Drôme, Lot, and Puy-de-Dôme, from beau "fair, lovely" and regard "aspect, outlook".
BEAUSÉJOURFrench (Rare)
Literally means "beautiful sojourn", derived from French beau "beautiful, nice, fine" and French séjour "sojourn, short stay". As such, this surname is most likely a locational surname, in that it originally referred to a scenic place to sojourn in... [more]
BEAUVAISFrench
From French place names derived from "beautiful sight".
BEEREnglish, German, Dutch, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from any of the forty or so places in southwestern England called Beer(e) or Bear(e). Most of these derive their names from the West Saxon dative case, beara, of Old English bearu ‘grove’, ‘wood’ (the standard Old English dative bearwe being preserved in Barrow)... [more]
BÉGONFrench
Probably from French béguin "(male) Beguin", referring to a member of a particular religious order active in the 13th century, and derived from the surname of Lambert le Bègue, the mid-12th-century priest responsible for starting it... [more]
BEHRGerman, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of the personal name Bähr (see Baer).
BEIJERINGDutch
The name Beijering Probably comes from the other but wider spread Dutch surname, Meijering. There is'nt much info I was able to find about both surnames except that there are many diferent forms of the surname like: Beije, Beijerink, Beijeringh, Beijer, Meijer, Meijerink, Meijeringh, etc... [more]
BELLETFrench
Comes from a derivative of bel ‘handsome’.
BENOITFrench
From the given name BENOIT.
BENSDutch, German
Patronymic from a short form of Bernhard.
BENWAREFrench
Americanized spelling of BENOIT.
BERGSMADutch
The surname Bergsma had orinally been German. It was then taken over to Holland possibly in the sixteenth century.... [more]
BERNADOTTEFrench, Swedish
Possibly from the name of a building in the French city of Pau called de Bernadotte. This was originally a French non-noble surname, but a member of the family later became King of Sweden.
BERNETFrench
From a pet form of Bernard.
BERNOULLIFrench
French patronymic surname that was derived from the first name Bernoul (which was probably derived from Bernold or Bernolf).
BETHENCOURTFrench, English, Portuguese (Rare)
Bettencourt and Bethencourt are originally place-names in Northern France. The place-name element -court (courtyard, courtyard of a farm, farm) is typical of the French provinces, where the Frankish settlements formed an important part of the local population... [more]
BETTENCOURTFrench, English, Portuguese (Rare)
Bettencourt and Bethencourt are originally place-names in Northern France. The place-name element -court (courtyard, courtyard of a farm, farm) is typical of the French provinces, where the Frankish settlements formed an important part of the local population... [more]
BEYFrench, German, Frisian
North German and Frisian: from the Old Frisian personal name Beyo or Boy/Boye (see Boye).... [more]
BILLEAUDFrench
From a personal name composed of the Germanic elements bil "sword" (or possibly bili "gentle") + wald "ruler".
BLACHERFrench
Mainly used in Southern France. Topographic name for someone who lived by an oak grove, originating in the southeastern French dialect word blache ‘oak plantation’ (said to be of Gaulish origin), originally a plantation of young trees of any kind.
BLANKDutch
Dutch and German nickname for a man with white or fair hair or a pale complexion, from Middle Low, Middle High German blanc "bright", "shining", "white", "beautiful", Middle Dutch blank "fair", "white".... [more]
BLANKENBILLERDutch
Habitational name from a place called Blankenbijl or similar.
BLASIUSGerman, Dutch, Scandinavian
From the Latin personal name Blasius. This was a Roman family name, originating as a byname for someone with some defect, either of speech or gait, from Latin blaesus "stammering" (compare Greek blaisos "bow-legged")... [more]
BLAZERDutch
from Middle Dutch blaser ‘blower’, hence an occupational name for a player of the trumpet or other wind instrument, or a nickname for a braggart or boaster
BLEECKERDutch
Occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, a launderer, or the owner of a public bleaching ground.
BLEEKERDutch
Occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, from Middle Dutch ble(e)kere.
BLEIBERGDutch
Habitational name from a place so named in Luxembourg province, Belgium.
BLOEMDutch
Means "flower" in Dutch.
BLONDERDutch
Occupational name for a brewer.
BLOOMJewish (American), Dutch
Americanized spelling of Bloem and Blum.
BODIFrench
The United State Version of Bodi is an alteration of the French name Baudin. The name also has roots from Hungary.
BODINFrench, English
Derived from Old French personal name BODIN or a variant spelling of BAUDOUIN.
BOEHMGerman, Dutch, Jewish
Ethnic name for a native or inhabitant of Bohemia (now the western part of the Czech Republic), from Böhmen, German name of Bohemia (Middle High German Böheim, Beheim). This derives its name from the tribal name Baii + heim "homeland"; the Baii were a tribe, probably Celtic, who inhabited the region in the 1st century A.D. and were gradually displaced by Slavic settlers in the period up to the 5th century... [more]
BOENDutch
Occupational name for a bean grower, from Middle Dutch bone, boene "bean".
BOISFrench, German
From French bois "forest"
BOITEUXFrench, Breton
From a Breton nickname meaning "lame".
BOJEDutch
Variant of Boye.
BOLLARDFrench
From a personal name composed of the Germanic elements boll "friend", "brother" + hard "hardy", "strong".
BONAPARTEItalian (Rare), French (Rare), Judeo-Italian (Rare), American (Rare), Caribbean (Rare)
Variant and French form of Buonaparte. This is also a Jewish surname. A notable bearer was Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1820), who ruled as Emperor of France from 1804 through 1814 and again briefly in 1815, who was of Italian (Tuscan) ancestry... [more]
BONGARDGerman, French
In german a rhenish place name "Obstgarten" (orchard).... [more]
BONNEMAISONFrench
Literally means "good house", derived from French bonne "good" and French maison "house". As such, this surname is most likely a locational surname, in that it originally either referred to someone who lived in a good house (probably more like a mansion) or to someone who was born in (or lived in) the place Bonnemaison, which is nowadays located in the Calvados department of France... [more]
BONUSFrench, German, Dutch
Humanistic Latinization of vernacular names meaning ‘good’, for example French Lebon or Dutch de Goede
BOOMHOUWERGerman, Dutch
Boomhouwer, means "Cutter of Trees", or "The one who hews trees", having Boom translating into "tree", houw meaning to "hew" or to "cut", and er meaning "the one who".... [more]
BOONEDutch
Variant of BOEN.
BOOTEnglish, Dutch, German
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of boots, from Middle English, Old French bote (of unknown origin).... [more]
BOOTSEnglish, Dutch, German
A variant of Boot meaning "shoemaker" in English or "boatman" in Dutch or German.
BOOTZDutch
A Dutch surname meaning a "nickname for a ridiculous person" or a variant of Boot
BORDEAUXFrench
City in France.
BOREMANDutch
Dutch: variant of Borneman. ... [more]
BORMANDutch, Low German, English
Dutch and North German: variant of Bormann. ... [more]
BORNEEnglish, French, Dutch
1. English: variant spelling of Bourne. ... [more]
BORNEMANDutch
1. Respelling of German Bornemann. ... [more]
BOSDutch
"Forest, Woods"... [more]
BOSWACHTERDutch
Dutch for "forester."
BOSWELLFrench (Anglicized)
"The name Boswell is an Anglicization of the name of a French village: Boseville (Beuzeville)". This was a village of 1400 inhabitants near Yvetot, in Normandy. (from “A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames”, by Charles W. Bardsley, New York, 1901)... [more]
BOTTINGEnglish, Dutch
Patronymic from BOTT, an Old English personal name of unknown origin.
BOUDREAUXFrench
Variant of Beaudreau. Originated in ancient area known as Languedoc, where the family was established. Comes from having lived in Languedoc, where the name was found since the early Middle Ages.
BOULANGERFrench
Means "baker" in French.
BOURBONFrench
The Bourbons were one of the most important ruling houses of Europe . Its members were descended from Louis I, duc de Bourbon from 1327 to 1342, the grandson of the French king Louis IX (ruled 1226-70)... [more]
BOUVIERFrench
Occupational name for a herdsman, from Old French bouvier, Late Latin boviarus, a derivative of bos, genetive bovis "ox."
BOVARYFrench
It is the surname of the famous fictional character Emma Bovary protagonist of Gustave Flaubert's novel.
BOWDLERFlemish, English
Originally de Boelare it evolved to Bowdler or Bowdle after Baldwin de Boelare came to England in 1105 & was given a lordship over Montgomery, Wales.
BOYEEnglish, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From the Germanic given names Boio or Bogo, which are of uncertain origin. Also possibly a variant of Bothe.
BOYERFrench
Means "Ox Gaurd," "Ox Leader", and/or "Boy". Origin is French.
BRAQUEFrench
Surname of cubist artist Georges Braque.
BRASDutch, Low German
Dutch and North German: from Old French and Middle Dutch bras ‘arm’. This was probably a descriptive nickname for someone with some peculiarity of the arm, but the word was also used as a measure of length, and may also have denoted a surveyor.
BRASHEARFrench (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of French Brasseur or Brassier "brewer."
BRASSEURFrench
French and English (of both Norman and Huguenot origin): occupational name for a brewer, from Old French brasser ‘to brew’. See also Brasher.
BRAUNERSHRITHERGerman, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
BRESSONFrench
From a pet form of the personal name Brès (see BRICE).
BRETONFrench, English
French and English: ethnic name for a Breton, from Old French bret (oblique case breton) (see Brett).
BREVARDFrench
French: nickname from Old French bref ‘small’ + the derogatory suffix -ard.... [more]
BRIGGSEnglish, Flemish
This surname is a variant of the more common name Bridges, which, contrary to appearances, has two possible origins, one the perhaps obvious English topographical or occupational one, and the other locational, from Belgium... [more]
BROOKGerman, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a water meadow or marsh, from Low German brook, Dutch broek (cf. BRUCH).... [more]
BROUWERDutch
Dutch occupational name for a brewer of beer or ale, Middle Dutch brouwer.
BROUWERSDutch
Possibly means "brewer; brewers" relating to one who brews beer.
BRUGMANDutch, Swiss
Dutch: topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper, from Dutch brugge ‘bridge’ (see Bridge); in some cases, it is a habitational name for someone from the Flemish city of Bruges (or Brugge), meaning ‘bridges’... [more]
BUFORDEnglish, French (Anglicized)
English: most probably a variant of Beaufort.... [more]
BURSwiss, Low German, Czech, French
Swiss and North German variant of Bauer. ... [more]
BURGEREnglish, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
BURNETTEFrench
Descriptive nickname from Old French burnete ‘brown’ (see Burnett). Possibly also a reduced form of Buronet, from a diminutive of Old French buron ‘hut’, ‘shack’.
CABANISSFrench
Variant spelling of Cabanis, a habitational name from any of various places in Gard named Cabanis, from Late Latin capannis ‘at the huts’, ablative plural of capanna 'hut'. This name was established in North American in the 18th century, probably by Huguenots.
CADEROUSSEFrench, Literature
A character in the classic novel The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel, Caderousse is a tailor and inkeeper who aids in the arrest of Dantès.
CADILLACFrench
From the name of a city in France, of origin I am not sure of (anyone who knows the name's etymology edit this). This is most notably the name of the car company of the same name, named after Detroit, Michigan founder Antoine de la Mothe, Sieur de Cadillac.
CAINEFrench, English
Originally from a French derogatory nickname for someine with a bad temper.
CAMPIONNorman, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: status name for a professional champion (see Champion, Kemp), from the Norman French form campion.
CANADAFrench, English
It derives from the Middle English "cane", a development of the Old French "cane", meaning cane, reed.
CANTELOUPFrench
Name of several places in France. The surname means "Song of the Wolf" from canta and loup as in "place where the wolves howl".
CARLINIrish (Anglicized), Scottish, French, Swedish, Italian, Jewish (Anglicized), German
Irish (now also common in Scotland) anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cairealláin, an Ulster family name, also sometimes Anglicized as Carlton, meaning ‘descendant of Caireallán’, a diminutive of the personal name Caireall... [more]
CARREFrench
French (Carré): from Old French carré "square", applied as a nickname for a squat, thickset man.
CARRELFrench
French: from Old French quar(r)el ‘bolt (for a crossbow)’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbow bolts or a nickname for a short, stout man. The word also meant ‘paving slab’, and so it could also have been a metonymic occupational name for a street layer... [more]
CARTIERFrench, Norman
Original Norman French form of Carter. A notable bearer was Breton-French explorer Jacques Cartier (1491-1557), who is known for discovering the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
CASEFrench
Case. A hut, a hovel.
CASSATTFrench
Origin uncertain. This is not known as a surname in Britain. It may be an Americanized form of a French name such as Casault.
CASSEFrench
Means "oak" in Gallo-Roman
CASTILLEFrench
Regional name for someone from Castile in central Spain (see Castilla).
CASTILLONFrench
means "castle"
CHABOTFrench
From chabot ‘bull-head’, a species of fish with a large head, hence a nickname for someone with a big head and a small body.
CHALLONERFrench, Welsh
Derived from a town in France of the same name. This family derive their origin from Macloy Crum, of the line of chiefs in Wales, who resided several years in Challoner.
CHAMBONFrench
A very popular last name in France.
CHAMPINFrench
It is the french form of Chapman
CHAMPLAINFrench
Name given to those who live in or around fields. Known barrer of the name is Samuel de Champlain who founded Quebec, Canada and after whom the lake is named.
CHAMPLINBelgian, English
Means Champion, was a family name in Belgium, a status and influence that was envied by the princes of the region.... [more]
CHAPINFrench, Spanish
From a reduced form of French eschapin or Spanish chapín, a term for a light (woman's) shoe; perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore this type of footwear or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker.
CHAPPELLFrench
Middle English and Old French for one associated with or living near a chapel.
CHARISSEFrench
Of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in honour of American actress and dancer Cyd Charisse (1921-2008).
CHARLESFrench, Welsh, English
Derived from the given name Charles.
CHARRETIERFrench
French form of Carter.
CHARRUEFrench
French for "cartwright."
CHASEFrench
Topographic name for someone who lived in or by a house, probably the occupier of the most distinguished house in the village, from a southern derivative of Latin casa "hut, cottage, cabin".
CHASTANGFrench
Derived from Olde French castanh meaning "chestnut". Possibly a location or occupation name.
CHAUXFrench
French / Switzerland.... [more]
CHÉNIERFrench
French surname which indicated one who lived in an oak wood or near a conspicuous oak tree, derived from Old French chesne "oak" (Late Latin caxinus). In some cases it may be from a Louisiana dialectical term referring to "an area of shrub oak growing in sandy soil" (i.e., "beach ridge, usually composed of sand-sized material resting on clay or mud... [more]
CHOATEEnglish, Dutch
The names of Choate and Chute are believed to have been of common origin and derived from the residence of their first bearers at a place called Chute in Wiltshire, England. Certain historians, however, state that the name of Choate was of Dutch origin and was taken by its first bearers from their residence at a place of that name in the Netherlands.
CHOPINFrench
French and English: nickname for a heavy drinker, from Old French chopine, a large liquid measure (from Middle Low German schopen "ladle"). The derived Old French verb chopiner has the sense 'to tipple’, ‘to drink to excess’... [more]
CHOQUETTEFrench
Altered spelling of French Choquet, a Picard form of Old French soquet, which was the term for a tax on wines and foodstuffs, hence a metonymic occupational name for a collector of such taxes.
CHRYSANTHEFrench
From the Greek Χρύσανθος (Chrysanthos), meaning "golden flower". This surname was first given to children found on October 25, the feast day of Saint Chrysanthos.
CLAUDEFrench
From the first name Claude.
CLAUDELFrench
From the given name Claudel.
CLAVELLFrench
The first documented records of the surname Clavell appear in Catalunya between 1291 and 1327. The word clavell traces back to the Indo-European words "kleu", later "klawo" meaning a metal tool. In Latin "clavus", it eventually became a surname "Clavell".
CLELANDBelgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
CLOUDFrench
From the Germanic personal name Hlodald, composed of the elements hlod "famous, clear" and wald "rule", which was borne by a saint and bishop of the 6th century.
CLUTEDutch
From kluit, meaning "lamp"
COERSGerman, Dutch
Derived from the given name Konrad
COLLARDEnglish, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
COLLETFrench
From a pet form of Colle.
COLLINESFrench
French for "hillbanks".
COMEAUFrench, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
COMMANDERAnglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
CONKLINIrish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
COONRODDutch
Americanized spelling of Dutch Coenraet or Koenraadt or German Kühnrat (Konrad).
CORDERFrench (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
CORMIERFrench
French topographic name for someone who lived near a sorb or service tree, Old French cormier (from corme, the name of the fruit for which the tree was cultivated, apparently of Gaulish origin).
COTTONEnglish, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
COURCELLESFrench
The name of several places in France, Belgium and Canada. In Middle French the word courcelle was used to describe a "small court" or a "small garden". The word is derived from the medieval Gallo-Romance and Gallo-Italian word corticella, which was formed from the Latin word cohors, meaning "court" or "enclosure", and the diminutive –icella.... [more]
COURTIERFrench, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
COURTOISFrench
French form of Curtis.... [more]
COUSINSFrench
"Relative" in Old French.
COVERTEnglish, French
The surname is probably topographical, for someone who either lived by a sheltered bay, or more likely an area sheltered by trees. The formation is similar to couvert, meaning a wood or covert, and originally from the Latin "cooperio", to cover... [more]
CRABBEnglish, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
CRANEEnglish, Dutch
1. English: nickname, most likely for a tall, thin man with long legs, from Middle English cran ‘crane’ (the bird), Old English cran, cron. The term included the heron until the introduction of a separate word for the latter in the 14th century... [more]
CRAUWELSFlemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
CRETEFrench
French (adjectival form Crété ‘crested’): nickname for an arrogant individual, from Old French creste ‘crest (of a hill)’ (Late Latin crista), used with reference to the comb of a rooster... [more]
CRISPINEnglish, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name CRISPIN.
CROZIEREnglish, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
CRUZANDutch
Americanized spelling of CRUYSSEN.
CULVÉRTFrench, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
CUYLERDutch
Variant of Koole or Kuilart.
DAANEDutch
From a pet form of the personal name Daniel.
D'ABBADIEFrench, English, Occitan
Means "of the Abbey" from the Occitan abadia. Variants Abadia, Abbadie, Abadie, Abada, and Badia mean "Abbey".
D'ABBEVILLEFrench
Means "of Abbeville" Abbeville is a commune in France. Takes its name from Latin Abbatis Villa meaning "Abbot's Village".
DALEIDENGerman, Dutch (Rare)
Habitational name from a place in the Rhineland called Daleiden.
DAMEFrench, English
From the old French dame, "lady" ultimately from Latin domina, "mistress".
DAMERONFrench
Nickname for a foppish or effeminate young man, Old French dameron, a derivative of Latin dominus "lord", "master" plus two diminutive endings suggestive of weakness or childishness.
DAMIANFrench, Spanish, Italian, Czech, Slovak, Polish
From the medieval personal name Damian, Greek Damianos (from damazein "to subdue"). St. Damian was an early Christian saint martyred in Cilicia in ad 303 under the emperor Domitian, together with his brother Cosmas... [more]
DANCYFrench, English
Denoted a person from Annecy, France.
DANSERGerman, French, English
German: variant of Danzer. Altered spelling of English Dancer.... [more]
D'AOUSTFrench
D'Aoust, denotes someone from Aoust(e) in France. Aouste is situated in the Ardennes department (Champagne-Ardenne region) in the north-east of France at 29 km from Charleville-Mézières, the department capital... [more]
D'ARCYEnglish, French, Norman
Originally a Norman French surname, meaning "from Arcy"... [more]
D'ARTAGNANFrench, Literature
Surname given to a person from Artagnan, France. It is also used by Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the captain of the Musketeers from the novel, "The Three Musketeers".
DAUGHTRYEnglish, Norman, French
English (of Norman origin) habitational name, with fused French preposition d(e), for someone from Hauterive in Orne, France, named from Old French haute rive ‘high bank’ (Latin alta ripa).
D'AUREVALLEFrench (Archaic)
This medieval surname literally means "from Aurevalle". Aurevalle can refer to any of the three French communes that are nowadays known by the more modern spelling Orival. All of them ultimately derive their name from Latin aurea vallis meaning "golden vale" or "golden valley".
D'AURÉVILLEFrench
Variant spelling of d'Aureville.
D'AUREVILLEFrench
This surname literally means "from Aureville". Aureville is a commune in southwestern France, which was established in late medieval times. It derives its name from Latin aurea villa or villa aurea which literally means "golden country-house, golden farm" but of course later came to mean "golden village".
D'AUREVILLYFrench
Variant form of d'Aureville. A known bearer of this name was the French novelist Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly (1808-1889).
DEBLOISFrench (Gallicized)
French surname meaning "From Blois", a town in Mid-Western France. The origins of the surname started back in the 1600s when a man named Grégoire Guérard traveled to Flanders (Now Belgium) and immigrated to New France (Now Canada) in 1658... [more]
DE BOERDutch
Variant of BOER.
DE BONTEDutch
Bont is a word to describe something with many colours, originally used for spotted cows. So the name means: The one with many colours. Figuratively speaking this would mean: The one who acts crazy.
DEBSFrench
From the given name Debus, a variant of Thebs or Thebus, which was an altered short form of Mattheus. This was borne by American union leader Eugene V. Debs (1855-1926).
DE CLERMONTFrench
Means "of the bright hill" from the French de meaning "of" and clair, cler 'bright', 'clear' + mont 'hill'
DEDEAUXFrench
Meaning uncertain. Probably a habitual surname for someone from Deaux in Gare.
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