Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is Marusero.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Roman Catalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
Saint English, French
Nickname for a particularly pious individual, from Middle English, Old French saint, seint "holy" (Latin sanctus "blameless, holy"). The vocabulary word was occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, especially on the Continent, and this may have given rise to some instances of the surname.
Sakimoto Japanese
From Japanese 崎 (saki) meaning "cape, peninsula" and 本 (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
Sakiyama Japanese
From Japanese 崎 (saki) "small peninsula, cape" and 山 (yama) "mountain".
Sakura Japanese
From Japanese 佐 (sa) meaning "help, aid" and 倉 (kura) meaning "warehouse, storehouse".
Sakurada Japanese
From Japanese 桜, 櫻 (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom" and 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Sakurano Japanese
Means "cherry blossom field" in Japanese, from 桜 (sakura) "cherry blossom" and 野 (no) "field".
Salvador Filipino, Spanish, Catalan, Tagalog, Portuguese
From the popular Christian personal name Salvador, meaning "Savior" (Latin Salvator, a derivative of salvare "to save"), bestowed in honor of Christ.
San Juan Spanish
Means "Saint John", derived from Spanish santo "saint" combined with Juan 1. This is a habitational name for a person from any of various places called San Juan, so named for a local shrine or church dedicated to Saint John (San Juan).
Satomiya Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese 里 (sato) meaning "village" and 宮 (miya) meaning "temple, shrine, palace".
Satonaka Japanese
From Japanese 里 (sato) meaning "village" and 中 (naka) meaning "middle".
Schemmel German
Nickname for a disabled person, from Middle High German schemel "stool", which was used as a crutch by invalids.
Sciortino Italian
Occupational name from a diminutive of sciorta, sciurta "city guard, watchman, policeman" (Arabic ̣shuṛtī).
Seitz Upper German
A mainly Bavarian surname, from a reduced form of the personal name Seifried, a variant of Siegfried... [more]
Seitzer German
Variant of Seitz.
She Chinese
From Chinese 佘 (shé), which is of unknown significance.
Shibayama Japanese
From Japanese 柴 (shiba) meaning "firewood" and 山 (yama) meaning "mountain, hill".
Shimamoto Japanese
From Japanese 島 (shima) meaning "island" and 本 (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
Shimamura Japanese
From Japanese 島 (shima) meaning "island" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Shimono Japanese
From Japanese 下 (shimo) meaning "under, below" and 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
Shinkai Japanese
From Japanese 新 (shin) meaning "new" and 海 (kai) meaning "sea, ocean".
Shinozaki Japanese
From Japanese 篠 (shino) meaning "dwarf bamboo" and 崎 (saki) meaning "cape, peninsula".
Shirakawa Japanese
From Japanese 白 (shira) meaning "white" and 川 (kawa) meaning "river, stream".
Si Chinese
From Chinese 司 (sī) meaning "to take charge of, to control, to manage" or "officer, official".
Silber German, Jewish
From Middle High German silber, German Silber "silver"; a metonymic occupational name for a silversmith, or often, in the case of the Jewish surname, an ornamental name.
Silberstein German, Jewish
From Middle High German silber "silver" and stein "stone"; a habitational name from a place so named in Bavaria, or a topographic name.... [more]
Son Korean
Korean form of Sun, from Sino-Korean 孫 (son) meaning "grandchild".
Spiegel German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" (via Old High German from Latin speculum, a derivative of specere "to look").
Staley English
Byname from Middle English staley "resolute, reliable", a reduced form of Stallard.
Staley Belgian
From Old French estalee "fish trap", hence possibly a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman, or topographic name for someone who lived near where fish traps were set.
Stallard English
Byname for a valiant or resolute person, from a reduced pronunciation of Middle English stalward, stalworth "stalwart" (an Old English compound of stǣl "place" and wierðe "worthy").
Stellrecht German
Occupational name for a cartwright, from Middle High German stel "framework" and reht (from Old High German wurht-) "maker". Compare English -wright.
Storm English, Low German, Dutch, Scandinavian
Nickname for a man of blustery temperament, from Middle English, Middle Low German, storm, Old Norse stormr "storm".
Straight English
Nickname from Middle English streʒt "straight, upright", presumably applied in either a literal or a figurative sense.
Strassmann German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone living on a main street, from Middle High German strasse, German Strasse "street, road" and man "man".
Sugino Japanese
From Japanese 杉 (sugi) meaning "cedar" and 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
Sugioka Japanese
From Japanese 杉 (sugi) meaning "cedar" and 岡 (oka) meaning "hill, ridge".
Sugita Japanese
From Japanese 杉 (sugi) meaning "cedar" and 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Summer English, German
From Middle English sum(m)er, Middle High German sumer "summer", hence a nickname for someone of a warm or sunny disposition, or for someone associated with the season of summer in some other way.
Suzukaze Japanese
From Japanese 涼 (suzu) meaning "cool, refreshing" and 風 (kaze) meaning "wind".
Szot Polish
Nickname for a fish seller with a bad reputation, from szot "bad herring".
Takaishi Japanese
From Japanese 高 (taka) meaning "tall, high" and 石 (ishi) meaning "stone".
Takamori Japanese
From Japanese 高 (taka) meaning "tall, high" and 森 (mori) meaning "forest".
Takamoto Japanese
From Japanese 高 (taka) meaning "tall, high" and 本 (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
Takayama Japanese
From Japanese 高 (taka) meaning "tall, high" and 山 (yama) meaning "mountain, hill".
Tatsuno Japanese
From Japanese 辰 (tatsu) meaning "dragon of the Chinese zodiac" and 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
Tennōji Japanese (Rare)
Composed of Japanese ten 天 meaning "heaven," ō (which becomes due to renjō) 王 meaning "king," and ji 寺 meaning "temple" or "Buddhist temple."
Terasaki Japanese
From Japanese 寺 (tera) meaning "Buddhist temple" and 崎 (saki) meaning "cape, peninsula".
Toba Japanese
From Japanese 鳥 (to) meaning "bird" and 羽 (ba) meaning "feather".
Tomioka Japanese
From Japanese 富 (tomi) meaning "wealth, abundance" and 岡 (oka) meaning "hill, ridge".
Tomlin English
From a pet form of Tom, a short form of the personal name Thomas.
Toriumi Japanese
From Japanese 鳥 (tori) meaning "bird" and 海 (umi) meaning "sea, ocean".
Toyosaki Japanese
From Japanese 豊 (toyo) meaning "abundant, lush, bountiful, plenty" and 崎 (saki) meaning "cape, peninsula".
Trainor Irish
Reduced form of McTraynor, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Thréinfhir "son of Tréinfhear", a byname meaning "champion, strong man" (from tréan "strong" and fear "man").
Trump English
Metonymic occupational name for a trumpeter, from Middle English trumpe "trumpet".
Tsai Taiwanese
Alternate romanization of Cai chiefly used in Taiwan.
Tsukioka Japanese
From Japanese 月 (tsuki) meaning "moon" and 岡 (oka) meaning "hill, ridge". A notable bearer of this surname was Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (月岡 芳年, 1839–1892), a Japanese artist who is widely recognized as the last great master of the ukiyo-e genre of woodblock printing and painting.
Uchihara Japanese
From Japanese 内 (uchi) meaning "inside" and 原 (hara) meaning "field, plain".
Uchimura Japanese
From Japanese 内 (uchi) meaning "inside" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Uekawa Japanese
From Japanese 上 (ue) meaning "above, top, upper" and 川 (kawa) meaning "river, stream".
Uesugi Japanese
From Japanese 上 (ue) meaning "above, top, upper" and 杉 (sugi) meaning "cedar".
Urano Japanese
From Japanese 浦 (ura) meaning "bay, inlet" and 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
Urata Japanese
From Japanese 浦 (ura) meaning "bay, inlet" and 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Uzumaki Japanese (Rare)
This name combines 渦 (ka, uzu) meaning "eddy, vortex, whirlpool" or 太 (ta, tai, futo.i, futo.ru) meaning "big around, plump, thick" with 巻 (kan, ken, maki, ma.ki, ma.ku) meaning "book, coil, part, roll up, scroll, tie, volume, wind up."... [more]
Vale English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a valley, Middle English vale (Old French val, from Latin vallis). The surname is now also common in Ireland, where it has been Gaelicized as de Bhál.
Valenzuela Spanish
Habitational name from places named Valenzuela in Córdoba and Ciudad Real. The place name is a diminutive of Valencia, literally "Little Valencia".
Valle Spanish, Filipino, Italian
Habitational name from any of the many places named with valle "valley", or topographic name for someone who lived in a valley (Latin vallis).
Valley English
Topographic name for someone who lived in a valley, Middle English valeye.
Verde Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From Spanish verde "green" (Latin viridis), presumably a nickname for someone who habitually dressed in this color or had green eyes, etc. This is also a common element of place names.
Wahl German, Jewish
From Middle High German Walhe, Walch "foreigner from a Romance country", hence a nickname for someone from Italy or France, etc. This surname is also established in Sweden.
Walch Irish
Variant of Walsh.
Wallgren Swedish
Composed of the Swedish elements vall "grassy bank, pasture" and gren "branch".
Welsh Irish
Variant of Walsh.
Welsh Scottish, English
Ethnic name for someone from Wales or a speaker of the Welsh language. Compare Walsh and Wallace.
Westwood English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Westwood, from Old English west "west" and wudu "wood".
Willingham English
Habitational name from a place named Willingham, notably one in Cambridgeshire and one in Suffolk. The first is recorded in Domesday Book as Wivelingham "homestead (Old English hām) of the people of a man called Wifel".
Wills English
Patronymic from Will.
Wills German
Patronymic from any of the Germanic personal names beginning with wil "will, desire".
Wind English, German, Danish
Nickname for a swift runner, from Middle English wind "wind", Middle High German wint "wind", also "greyhound".
Wind English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pathway, alleyway, or road, Old English (ge)wind (from windan "to go").
Wise English
Nickname for a wise or learned person, or in some cases a nickname for someone suspected of being acquainted with the occult arts, from Middle English wise "wise" (Old English wis). This name has also absorbed Dutch Wijs, a nickname meaning "wise", and possibly cognates in other languages.
Wittenberg Low German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Wittenberg, Wittenberge, or Wittenbergen.
Wren English
Nickname from the bird, Middle English wrenne, probably in reference to its small size.
Yamagishi Japanese
From Japanese 山 (yama) meaning "mountain" and 岸 (kishi) meaning "beach, shore, bank".
Ye Chinese
From Chinese 葉 (yè) meaning "leaf".
Yorath Welsh
Derived from the Welsh given name Iorwerth.
Yoshihara Japanese
From Japanese 吉 (yoshi) meaning "lucky, good" and 原 (hara) meaning "field, plain".
Yoshii Japanese
From Japanese 吉 (yoshi) meaning "lucky, good" and 井 (i) meaning "well, mine shaft, pit".
Yoshikawa Japanese
From Japanese 吉 (yoshi) meaning "good luck" and 川 (kawa) meaning "river, stream".
Yoshinaga Japanese
From Japanese 吉 (yoshi) meaning "good luck" and 永 (naga) meaning "perpetual, eternal".
Yuki Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 結城 (see Yuuki).
Yurchak Polish (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Polish Jurczak.
Yusa Japanese
From Japanese 遊 (yu) meaning "play" and 佐 (sa) meaning "help, aid".
Yuuki Japanese
From Japanese 結 (yuu) meaning "tie, bind" and 城 (ki) meaning "castle".
Zoppi Italian
Nickname from zoppo "lame, unsteady".