Literature Submitted Surnames

These names occur primarily in literature. They are not commonly given to real people.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
BAGGINS Literature
In J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings," the surname of Frodo Baggins. Also the name of his relative Bilbo Baggins. The Bagginses are a well-to-do and respectable family of Hobbits living in Hobbiton of the Shire... [more]
BRANDYBUCK Literature
Brandybuck is the surname of Meriadoc, a young Hobbit in J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings." Possibly derived from the Brandywine River, which in turn is derived from Sindarin Baranduin, "Brown River"... [more]
CADEROUSSE French, Literature
A character in the classic novel The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel, Caderousse is a tailor and inkeeper who aids in the arrest of Dantès.
CHAPEAUX Literature
From the French word 'chapeaux', which means 'hats'.
COMBEFERRE Literature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
COURFEYRAC Literature
Courfeyrac is the surname that Victor Hugo used for Marius' closest friend in the friend of the ABC. Meaning is unknown.
CRABBE English, Literature, Popular Culture
The character 'Vincent Crabbe' has this surname in the Harry Potter series.
DAAE Literature, Norwegian, Danish (Rare), Swedish (Rare)
Norwegian surname, originating in Trondheim in the 17th century. Also a variant of Daa, the name of a Danish noble family which originated in Southern Jutland in the 14th century. ... [more]
DAIES Literature
Variant of the surname Days (see Day)
DARLING Literature, English, Scottish
English and Scottish: from Middle English derling, Old English deorling ‘darling’, ‘beloved one’, a derivative of deor ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ (see Dear). This was quite a common Old English byname, which remained current as a personal name into the 14th century... [more]
D'ARTAGNAN French, Literature
Surname given to a person from Artagnan, France. It is also used by Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the captain of the Musketeers from the novel, "The Three Musketeers".
DE BOIS Arthurian Romance
Possible form of the French surname Dubois. This is the last name of Prince Arthur's mother Ygraine de Bois in the series Merlin.
DENISOVICH Russian, Literature
Means “son of Denis”. Used in the 1962 book "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich."
DU LAC Arthurian Romance
In the series Merlin, this was the surname of Sir Lancelot: Lancelot du Lac. du Lac possibly means "of the lake."
DUMBLEDORE English (?), Literature, Popular Culture
This is the surname of Albus Dumbledore, a major character in the Harry Potter-universe created by English author J. K. Rowling.
EILEEN Literature
From the given name Eileen.
ENJOLRAS Literature
From a surname which was from Occitan enjeura meaning "to terrify". This was the name of a charismatic activist in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862).
FESTE Literature
Feste was the fool in Twelfth Night, written by William Shakespeare.
FROLLO Literature
Meaning unknown. This was the surname of Claude Frollo, the antagonist of Victor Hugo’s novel The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
GRANTAIRE Literature
This is the name of a minor character in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862), a follower of the revolutionary Enjolras.
JAVERT Literature
The name of the policeman in Victor Hugo's "Les Misérables." His name was taken from the word Javert, which means "to pursue relentlessly."... [more]
KARENINA Literature
In Leo Tolstoy's novel 'Anna Karenina' (1877), this is the title character's surname, the feminine form of her husband's surname, Karenin.
LANGFORD Literature, English
An English habitational name from any of the numerous places named in Old English as ‘long ford’, from lang, long ‘long’ + ford ‘ford’, except for Langford in Nottinghamshire, which is named with an Old English personal name Landa or possibly land, here used in a specific sense such as ‘boundary’ or ‘district’, with the same second element.
LANGKOUS Literature
Dutch and Afrikaans form of Långstrump
LANGSTRØMPE Literature
Danish and Norwegian form of Långstrump
LÅNGSTRUMP Literature
Last name of Pippi Långstrump, the original Swedish name for Pippi Longstocking, a character invented by Astrid Lindgren. Pippi's name was allegedly made up by Lindgren's daughter Karin. It's a combination of Swedish lång "long" and strumpa "sock".
LESTRADE Literature
The name of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional head of Scotland Yard. Possibly from the French surname Lestrange
LONGBOTTOM English, Literature, Popular Culture
English (West Yorkshire) topographic name for someone who lived in a long valley, from Middle English long + botme, bothem ‘valley bottom’. Given the surname’s present-day distribution, Longbottom in Luddenden Foot, West Yorkshire, may be the origin, but there are also two places called Long Bottom in Hampshire, two in Wiltshire, and Longbottom Farm in Somerset and in Wiltshire.
LONGSTOCKING Literature
The last name of Pippi Longstocking. English form of LÅNGSTRUMP.
LOVEGOOD Literature (Modern), Popular Culture
The Character 'Luna Lovegood' in the Harry Potter has last name as well as 'Xenophilius Lovegood'.
NAZIMOVA Russian, Literature
Notable users of the name includes the Russian silent screen star Alla Nazimova (1879-1945) and the heroine of the Russian novel 'Children of the Streets', Nadezhda Nazimova.
PANACK Literature
Meaning "Panic" or "Worry".
PIRRIP Literature, Popular Culture
Surname of the main character in Charles Dickens novel, Great Expectations.
POIROT French, Literature
A French occupational name referring to a merchant who sells pears (poire). Used by Agatha Christie for her Belgian private detective Hercule Poirot, but she came up with the name by combining the surnames Poiret and Popeau, the names of two contemporary fictional detectives.
RASKOLNIKOV Literature
The surname of Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, protagonist of Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. It derives from the Russian word raskolnik, meaning "schismatic" or a member of the Old Believer sect.
ROSTOV Russian, Literature
Either derived from Rostov Oblast, a Russian federal subject, the town of Rostov in Yaroslavl Oblast, or Rostov-on-Don, a Russian city in the Rostov Oblast. This is also the surname of multiple characters from Leo Tolstoy's 1869 novel "War and Peace".
SCROOGE Literature
The name of a character in a book by Dickens.
SÉERA Literature
Coming from an old Rowénan word to mean "king" or "leader", SÉERA is nowan uncomon surname. Used by the ruling family of eastern Erikówna (see TYRAN).
SORDINO Italian (Rare), Literature
Derived from Italian sordino, referring to a mute for musical instruments. It is ultimately from Italian sordo "deaf" or "muffled (sound), silent, hidden, voiceless". American author Laurie Halse Anderson uses this for her novel Speak (1999), on high school rape victim Melinda Sordino... [more]
TARGARYEN Literature
The surname of Daenerys from the book series "A Song of Ice and Fire" by George R. R. Martin and the TV series adaptation "Game of Thrones".
TOOK Literature
In J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings", the surname of Peregrin "Pippin" Took, a cousin of Meriadoc Brandybuck and second cousin of Frodo Baggins. Bandobras Took, also known as the Old Took, is somewhat a famous name in Hobbit-lore, as he was not only adventurous but a friend of Gandalf's and tall enough to ride a horse... [more]
ULENSPEGEL Low German, Literature
This is the name of Dyl Ulenspegel is a trickster figure originating in Middle Low German folklore, possibly meaning "owl mirror".
VALJEAN Literature
Meaning unknown. Jean Valjean is the name of the ex-convict, mayor, and gaurdian of the child Cosette in Victor Hugo's 'Les Miserables'. (1862)
YELNATS Literature
Invented by Louis Sacher for his novel "Holes". The name was created because it is Stanley spelled backwards. Stanley Yelnats IV is the main character in the novel.