Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is Beautiful Victory.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AANorwegian
Derived from aa, an obsolete spelling of Norwegian å "small river, stream".
AABERGDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian cognate of ÅBERG.
AABYNorwegian, Danish
From a place called Aaby or Åby, from Old Norse á "small river, stream" and býr "farm".
AADLANDNorwegian
Derived from a place called Ådland, from Old Norse Árland "land by the river".
AAMODTNorwegian
Combination of aa, an obsolete spelling of Norwegian å "small river, stream" and møte "meeting".
AANENSONEnglish (American, Anglicized)
Anglicized form of rare Norwegian surname Ånundson meaning "son of ÅNUND".
AARHUSNorwegian
Derived from any of the farms so named, from Old Norse á "river" and hús "house, farmstead".
AASNorwegian, Danish
Variant spelling of ÅS.
AASENNorwegian
Means "the ridge" in Norwegian. Definite singular form of AAS.
ABBSEnglish
Derived from the given name Abel.
ÅBERGSwedish
Combination of Swedish å "small river" and berg "mountain".
ABERNATHYScottish
A different form of Abernethy, which originally meant "person from Abernethy", Perth and Kinross ("confluence of the (river) Nethy"). This was one of the surnames of the Scots who settled in northern Ireland during the ‘plantation’ in the 17th century, and it was brought to the U.S. as the name of a Southern plantation owner.
ACKROYDEnglish
Topographic name from northern Middle English ake "oak" and royd "clearing".
ADDYEnglish
From the personal name ADDY, a medieval diminutive of ADAM. It is therefore related to the surname ADDISON.
ADIEEnglish, Scottish
From the personal name ADIE, a medieval pet form of ADAM.
AHLSwedish
Derived from Swedish al "alder tree".
AHLBORNSwedish (Rare)
Ornamental name composed of the elements al "alder" and -born, a Swedish surname suffix derived from German geboren "born".
AHLINSwedish
From al 'alder' and -in, a common ending of Swedish surnames derived from Latin -inus, -inius 'descendant of'.
AHLQUISTSwedish
Combination of Swedish al "alder" and quist an old or ornamental spelling of kvist "twig".
ÅHMANSwedish
Combination of Swedish å "small river" and man "man".
AHONENFinnish
A combination of Finnish aho "meadow" and the common surname suffix -nen.... [more]
AIDENEnglish
Derived from the first name AIDEN.
AISAKAJapanese (Rare)
Ai means "Indigo (blueish)", and Saka means "Hill,Slope".In 2014 Aisaka was ranked #9,579 for most used surnames in Japan and had only 5 occurrences that year. It's more popular in the U.S. than in the country it originated from... [more]
ÅKERSwedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
From Swedish and Norwegian åker "plowed field".
ÅKERHIELMSwedish
Combination of Swedish åker "field" and hjälm "helmet".
ÅKERSTRÖMSwedish
Combination of Swedish åker "field" and ström "stream".
ÅKESSONSwedish
Means "son of ÅKE".
AKEYEnglish
Possibly an Americanized form of German EICHE "oak".
ALCOCKEnglish
From a diminutive of given names starting with Al-.
ALCOTTEnglish
English: ostensibly a topographic name containing Middle English cott, cote ‘cottage’ (see Coates). In fact, however, it is generally if not always an alteration of Alcock, in part at least for euphemistic reasons.
ALDERSONEnglish (Modern)
Patronymic from the Middle English forename Alder, derived from two Old English names, Ealdhere ‘ancient army’ and Æ{dh}elhere ‘noble army’. Means "son of Aldert".
ALFSENNorwegian
Norwegian cognate of ALFSSON.
ALFSTADNorwegian (Rare)
Possibly a combination of the given name Alf and stad "city, town".
ALFVÉNSwedish (Rare)
Perhaps derived from Swedish älv "river".
ALGOTSSONSwedish
Means "son of Algot".
ALINSwedish
Variant of Ahlin.
ALJAŽSlovene
Etymological origin unknown, possibly from the latin word alias, meaning "different".
ALLEMANNGerman (Swiss)
Allemann (also spelled Alleman, Allemand, Aléman, Allamont, Allemagne, Alemaye, Alemán, and Allamán) is a surname that can be found primarily in Switzerland deriving from the Latin surname, Alemannus, which refers to someone of Germanic descent, specifically from the Alamanni tribe... [more]
ALLISONEnglish, Scottish
Patronymic from a Middle English male personal name, most likely ALLEN, but other possibilities include ELLIS or of a short form of ALEXANDER. ... [more]
ALMSwedish
Means "elm" in Swedish.
ALMBLADSwedish
Combination of Swedish alm "elm" and blad "leaf".
ALMLÖFSwedish
Combination of Swedish alm "elm" and löv "leaf".
ALMQVISTSwedish
Combination of Swedish alm "elm" and kvist "twig, branch".
AMBROSEEnglish
From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal".
AMUNDSONEnglish (American, Anglicized), Swedish (Rare)
Anglicized from or rare Swedish variant of AMUNDSEN.
ANDERSGerman, Scottish, Czech
Derived from the given name Anders.
ANDERSDOTTERSwedish
Strictly feminine patronymic of Anders.
ANDRÉNSwedish
Latinized patronymic from the name Andreas.
ANDRESENNorwegian
Means "son of ANDRE".
ANNAEnglish, Irish, Italian, Hungarian
Probably derived from the female first name ANNA.
ANTHONYEnglish
From the personal name ANTHONY.
ANTONSSONSwedish
Means "son of ANTON".
ANZAIJapanese
From Japanese 安 (an) meaning "calm, peaceful" combined with 西 (sai) meaning "west", 斎 (sai) meaning "worship, religious meals", or 済 (sai) meaning "settle, finish".
AOKIJapanese
Means "green tree" in Japanese. From the Japanese words 青 (green) and 木 (tree).... [more]
AOZAKIJapanese (Rare)
Ao means "blue,somewhat green" & zaki means "blossom". So, Nobutaka "Blue Blossom",is an artist who was born in Japan,but now lives in New York as an artist who has been featured in magazines.
APPELKVISTSwedish
Combination of Swedish apel or äpple both meaning "apple" and kvist "branch, twig".
ARADHYAIndian, Sanskrit
Means "one who worships god". Commonly seen in India, Karnataka and other parts of India like kashi. They wear holy thread (yagnopaveetha).
ARAYAJapanese (Rare)
"Wild{ara}" or "New{ara}" and "Ya{valley}". It is pronounced this way in Eastern Japan,in the west it's "Aratani".
ARBOURFrench (Quebec)
Variant of Harbour or possibly a variant of Harbaud or Herbert.
ARCHIBALDEnglish
From the personal name ARCHIBALD.
ARCHULETASpanish, English
Castilianized form of Basque Aretxuloeta, a topographic name meaning "oak hollow".
ARIMAJapanese (Rare)
This is a surname and first name that means "Owns A Horse". In the west and in the Ryukyu Islands is where this name is mostly possessed. This is taken from the Aroma hot spring near the city of Kobe.
ARITAJapanese (Rare)
Ari means "Has" or "Owns" and Ta means "Rice Patty". This is most is most common in west-central Japan.
ÄRLIGSwedish (Rare)
Means "honest" in Swedish.
ARNESSONSwedish
Means "son of Arne".
AROUETFrench
A famous bearer was French philosopher Voltaire (1694-1778), whose birth name was François-Marie Arouet.
ARROYOSpanish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named with arroyo "watercourse", "irrigation channel."
ARVIDSSONSwedish
Means "son of ARVID".
ÅSSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Means "ridge, hill" in the Scandinavian languages.
ASATOJapanese (Rare)
There are several readings for the name but 2 are Asa:"Morning",and To:"Door,Asa:"Safe" and To:"Village". There are multiple places in the Ryukyu's (where the name originates and mostly stays) that have that name;that could've been the influence... [more]
ASHMANEnglish, Anglo-Saxon
From Middle English Asheman, a byname meaning "pirate, seaman". It can also be made up of English ash referring to the "ash tree", and man. In that case, it could refer to someone who lived by ash trees... [more]
ASHTONEnglish
Derived from a place name which meant "ash tree town" in Old English.
ASIKKALAFinnish
Could be a habitational name from a place so named in southern Finland.
ASKSwedish
From Swedish ask "ash tree".
ÅSLUNDSwedish
Combination of Swedish ås "ridge, esker" and lund "grove".
ASSARSSONSwedish
Means "son of ASSAR".
ÅSTRÖMSwedish
Swedish ornamental name meaning "small river stream". A combination of å "small river" and ström "stream".
AUNENorwegian
Derived from Old Norse auðn "wasteland, desolate place".
AUTCzech, German (Swiss), Russian, Catalan
Means "Hard Worker" in Czech.... [more]
AXELLSwedish
Possibly a habitational name with the combination of ax, a Swedish word for the fruiting body of a grain plant, and the common surname suffix -ell.
AZALEAEnglish, Indonesian, Various
From the name of the flower (see Azalea). A notable bearer is Australian rapper Amethyst Amelia Kelly, who's better known by her stage name Iggy Azalea.
BÄCKLUNDSwedish
Combination of Swedish bäck "brook, stream" and lund "grove".
BACKLUNDSwedish
Combination of Swedish backe "hill, slope" and lund "grove".
BÄCKMANSwedish
Combination of Swedish bäck "small stream" and man "man".
BACKMANEnglish, Swedish, German
Combination of Old English bakke "spine, back" and man "man". In Swedish, the first element is more likely to be derived from Swedish backe "hill", and in German the first element can be derived from German backen "to bake"... [more]
BÄCKSTRÖMSwedish
Combination of Swedish bäck "brook" and ström "stream".
BAERGerman
Derived from Old High German bero "bear".
BAEZASpanish
From a place called Baeza in Andalusia, Spain.
BAKKENorwegian
Means "slope, hillside" in Norwegian.
BAKKENNorwegian
Definite singular form of BAKKE.
BALCOMEnglish
Altered spelling of English Balcombe, a habitational name from Balcombe in West Sussex, which is named with Old English bealu "evil, calamity" (or the Old English personal name Bealda) combined with cumb "valley".
BANEEnglish
Variant of Bain.
BARRIEREFrench
Occupational name for a gatekeeper, from Old French barier.
BARRONEnglish
Variant of BARON.
BARROWEnglish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named with Old English bearo, bearu "grove" or from Barrow in Furness, Cumbria, which is named with an unattested Celtic word, barr, here meaning "promontory", and Old Norse ey "island"... [more]
BAUCOMEnglish
Variant spelling of BALCOMBE, a habitational name from West Sussex derived from Old English bealu "evil" and cumb "valley".
BAVIERASpanish, Portuguese, Italian, Catalan
Means "Bavaria" in Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and Catalan. Indicating for someone from Bavaria a state in Germany.
BAYEnglish
From the Middle English given name BAYE.
BAYEnglish, French, Dutch
Derived from Middle English and Old French bay, bai and Middle Dutch bay, all meaning "reddish brown". It was originally a nickname for someone with a hair color similar to that.
BAYScottish
Reduced form of McBeth.
BAYGerman
From the given name Baio.
BAYDanish, Norwegian (Rare)
Likely a reduced form of German BAYER.
BAYLOREnglish
Possibly derived from the legal term bailor "one who delivers goods". It could also be a respelling of German name BEILER, an occupational name for an inspector of measures or a maker of measuring sticks... [more]
BEACHEnglish
Name for someone living near a beach, stream, or beech tree.
BEAMEnglish
From Old English beam "beam" or "post". It could be a topographic name from someone living near a post or tree, or it could be a metonymic occupational name for a weaver.... [more]
BEELEREnglish
Anglicized spelling of German BIEHLER.
BEFFAItalian
Nickname for a practical joker, from Italian beffa "trick, prank".
BEIHLEnglish, German
Variant of BIEHL, a short form of BIEHLER.
BELLINGHAMEnglish
Habitational name from places called Bellingham.
BENDTSDATTERDanish (Archaic), Norwegian (Archaic)
Strictly feminine patronymic for Bendt.
BENGTSONEnglish, Swedish
Variant of the Swedish surname Bengtsson.
BERATurkish, Arabic
Means "knowledgeable, smart, beautiful".
BERGDAHLSwedish, German
Combination of Swedish berg "mountain, hill" and dal "valley".
BERGGRENSwedish
Swedish surname meaning "mountain branch". From berg "mountain" and gren "branch".
BERGKVISTSwedish
Swedish surname meaning "mountain branch". From berg "mountain" and kvist "branch".
BERGLINSwedish
Combination of Swedish berg "mountain" and the popular surname suffix -in, derived from Latin -inus, -inius meaning "descendant of". The second element could also be derived from Swedish lind "lime tree" or lin "flax, linseed".
BERGQVISTSwedish
Variant spelling of Bergkvist.
BERLINGerman, English, Swedish
Habitational name from the city in Germany, the name of which is of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from an Old Slavic stem berl- meaning swamp or from a West Slavic word meaning "river lake".... [more]
BESKOWSwedish
Derived from the name of the city Beeskow in Germany. A notable bearer was Swedish author and illustrator Elsa Beskow (1874-1953).
BETHELEnglish, Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Welsh ab Ithel "son of ITHEL".
BHAERGerman
Likely a variant of German BAER, meaning "bear". A notable bearer is character Friedrich Bhaer, Jo's husband in Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.
BIBLEEnglish
From the given name BIBEL or an altered spelling of German BIEBL.
BICKNELLEnglish (British)
Contracted form of the placename Bickenhill in Somerset, England.
BIDDLEEnglish, Irish
Variant of English BEADLE or German BITTEL. The name is now popular in the north east region of America, where it was brought by English and Irish immigrants.
BIGELOWEnglish
Habitational name from a place in England called Big Low meaning "big mound".
BILDTSwedish, Danish
Bildt is a Danish-Swedish-Norwegian noble family originating from Jutland in Denmark and now domiciled in Bohus county in southwest Sweden. The Norwegian branch of the family died out in the beginning of the 18th century... [more]
BILSLANDScottish
From a place near Kilmaurs in East Ayrshire, Scotland. Allegedly a combination of BIL and land "farm, land, property".
BIRCHFIELDEnglish
Variant of English BURCHFIELD or an anglicized form of German BIRKENFELD.
BIRKSlovene
Of unknown origin.
BIRKGerman
Either a variant of Buerk or a habitational name derived from places named Birk, Birke, or Birken.
BIRKELANDNorwegian
Derived from Old Norse birki "birch" and land "farm, land". Birkeland is the name of a village and parish in western Norway. The parish got it's name from an old farm. The parish church was built on the same spot where the farm once was.
BJÖRKLUNDSwedish
Swedish ornamental name meaning "grove of birch trees". A combination of björk "birch" and lund "grove".
BJÖRNSwedish
Means "bear" in Swedish.
BLACKWELLEnglish
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Cumbria, Derbyshire, County Durham, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire, named Blackwell, from Old English blæc "black, dark" and wæll(a), well(a) "spring, stream".
BLAIKLOCKScottish (Anglicized, Modern, Rare)
Allegerdly from Blacklock which supposedly described the colour of someone's hair.
BLAINScottish (Anglicized), Scottish Gaelic, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name BLÁÁN, a shortened form of MACBLAIN, or a variant of BLIN. It could also be a nickname for a person suffering from boils, from Middle English blain "blister"
BLAINEScottish
Derived from the given name BLÁÁN.
BLAUSTEINGerman, Jewish
Ornamental name from German blau "blue" and Stein "stone", i.e. lapis lazuli.
BLIXTSwedish
From Swedish blixt "lightning, flash".
BLOEMDutch
Means "flower" in Dutch.
BLOMKVISTSwedish
From Swedish blom "bloom" and kvist "twig, branch". ... [more]
BLOMQVISTSwedish
Variant spelling of Blomkvist.
BLOOMEnglish
Metonymic occupational name for an iron worker, from Middle English blome ‘ingot (of iron)’.
BLOOMSwedish
Variant of BLOM.
BLOOMJewish (American), Dutch
Americanized spelling of Bloem and Blum.
BLUMEGerman, English
Could be from the Jewish surname Blum of from Swedish Blom. It could also be from the English word bloom.
Norwegian
Variant of BØE. A notable bearer is Norwegian biathlete Tarjei Bø (b. 1988).
BÓBSKIPolish
Possibly derived from the Polish word bób, which means "broad bean".
BODÉNSwedish
Swedish ornamental name composed of Swedish bod "small hut" and the common surname suffix -én, a derivative of Latin -enius "descendant of".
BODENGerman, Low German
Patronymic from the personal name BODE or a topographic name for someone living in a valley bottom or the low-lying area of a field. From Middle High German boden "ground, bottom".
BODENIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó BUADÁIN.
BODENEnglish
Possibly a variant of BALDWIN.
BODINFrench, English
Derived from Old French personal name BODIN or a variant spelling of BAUDOUIN.
BODINGerman
Probably derived from various Germanic personal names beginning with Bod- "messenger", or from the habitational name Boddin, name of several places in Mecklenburg and Brandenburg.
BODINSwedish
Variant of BODÉN.
BØENorwegian
Derived from Old Norse býr "farm, village, settlement" or búa "to reside".
BOEINGEnglish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of German Böing. This was the surname of American industrialist William Boeing (1881-1956) who founded The Boeing Company, a manufacturer of airplanes.
BOEKHOUTEnglish
Probably a habitational name from the village Boekhoute in northern Belgium, close to the border to The Netherlands.
BØENNorwegian
Habitational name from the common farm name Bøen, simply meaning "the farm" (ultimately derived from Old Norse býr "farm, village, settlement" and the definite article -en).
BOHARTEnglish (Rare)
Meaning unknown.
BOJEDutch
Variant of Boye.
BOLENEnglish
Variant of BULLEN.
BOLENCzech, Polish
From a pet form of the given names BOLESLAV, BOLESŁAW or BOLEBOR.... [more]
BOMANSwedish
Combination of Swedish bo (noun) "nest, farm, dwelling" and man "man".
BOMENGENEnglish (American), Norwegian (Rare)
Name created from during immigration from Norway to the United States in either the late 19th or early 20th century meaning, "The farm with the big gate."
BONDESwedish, Old Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse bóndi "farmer". Used as both a last name and a (rare) given name in Sweden (see BONDE for the given name and BONDESSON as an example of a patronymic derived from this name)... [more]
BONDEEnglish
Variant of BOND.
BONDENorwegian (Rare)
From a farm named Bonde, named with Old Norse bóndi "farmer" and vin "meadow".
BONDESSONSwedish
Means "son of BONDE", or possibly "son of a farmer".
BORCHERTGerman, English
Variant of Borchardt (see BURKHARD).
BORECKIEnglish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Borek or Borki, from bór "pine forest".
BORÉNSwedish
Ornamental name composed of an unexplained first element and the common surname suffix -en, from Latin -enius "descendant of".... [more]
BORGEDALENNorwegian (Rare)
Combination of Norwegian borg "fortification, castle" and dal "valley".
BÖRJESSONSwedish
Means "son of "BÖRJE".
BORSHEIMNorwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from either of two farmsteads in Norway: Borsheim in Rogaland and Børsheim in Hordaland. Borsheim is a combination of an unknown first element and Norwegian heim "home", while Børsheim is a combination of Old Norse byrgi "fence, enclosure" and heim.
BOSTONEnglish
Habitational name from the town Boston in Lincolnshire, England. The name means "Botwulf’s stone".... [more]
BOSTRÖMSwedish
Combination of Swedish bo "dwelling, home" and ström "stream, river".
BOTTINGEnglish, Dutch
Patronymic from BOTT, an Old English personal name of unknown origin.
BOWDENIrish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó BUADÁIN.
BOWDENEnglish
Habitational name from any of several places called Bowden or Bowdon, most of them in England. From Old English boga "bow" and dun "hill", or from Old English personal names BUGA or BUCGE combined with dun.... [more]
BOWIEScottish Gaelic
Scots Gaelic Bhuidhe or Buidhe meaning "golden yellow". Name was originally Mac Gille Bhuid, meaning "son of the yellow-haired lad". It was shortened to MacilBuie and MacilBowie in the 1600's, and further shortened in the 1700's to Buie and anglicised to Bowie by English speaking census takers and record keepers on the Scottish mainland.
BOYEEnglish, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From the Germanic given names Boio or Bogo, which are of uncertain origin. Also possibly a variant of Bothe.
BRAGERNorwegian (Rare)
From the name of any of the various farmsteads in eastern Norway, which may have derived their name from a river name meaning "roaring", "thundering".
BRANNERDanish, German, English
Danish variant of BRANDER and German variant of BRANTNER.
BRANTINGSwedish
A combination of Swedish brant "steep hill" and the suffix -ing. A famous bearer was Hjalmar Branting (1860–1925), Prime Minister of Sweden in the 1920s.
BRÅTHENNorwegian
Derived from Old Norse broti "land cleared for cultivation by burning". This was a common farm name in southeastern Norway.
BRAUNERSHRITHERGerman, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
BREKKENorwegian
Derived from Old Norse brekka meaning "hill, slope".
BREVIKNorwegian
Habitational name from any of several farms named Brevik, from Norwegian bred "broad" and vik "bay".
BRINDLEYEnglish
Habitational name from a place in England so named. From Old English berned "burnt" and leah "woodland clearing".
BRINSONEnglish
Habitational name from Briençun in northern France.
BRITNELLEnglish
Habitational name from a place called Brinton in Norfolk, England. See BRINTON.
BRODÉNSwedish
Ornamental name or topographic name, probably composed of the elements bro ‘bridge’ + the adjectival suffix -én, from Latin -enius.
BRODERICKIrish, Welsh, English
Surname which comes from two distinct sources. As a Welsh surname it is derived from ap Rhydderch meaning "son of Rhydderch". As an Irish surname it is an Anglicized form of Ó Bruadair meaning "descendent of Bruadar"... [more]
BROLINSwedish, English (Anglicized)
Swedish ornamental name composed of bro "bridge" and the suffix -in (derived from Latin -inus, -inius) "descendant of".... [more]
BROMLEYEnglish
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. Most of them derived from Old English brom "broom" and leah "woodland clearing".
BROOMFIELDEnglish
From a place name meaning "gorse field", from Old English brom "gorse" and feld "field, open country".
BROUGHTONEnglish
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. The first name element is derived from Old English broc "brook", burh "fortress", or beorg "castle". The second element is derived from Old English tun "settlement, dwelling".
BUCKMANEnglish
Occupational name for a goatherd (Middle English bukkeman) or scholar (Old English bucman "book man"). It could also be a shortened form of BUCKINGHAM or a variant of BUCKNAM.
BUONOItalian, English
Nickname derived from Italian buono "good".
BURCHEnglish
Variant of Birch.
BUREOld Swedish, Swedish
This was the name of an influential family in 16th century Sweden. The name originated from the village Bure (now known as Bureå) in Skellefteå parish in Northern Sweden. The village got its name from the nearby Bure River (Swedish: Bure älv, Bureälven) whose name was derived from the Swedish dialectal word burra "buzz, rumble".
BURGEREnglish, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
BURKENEnglish
English variant of Birkin (see Burkins).
BURRISEnglish
Variant of English BURROWS or German BÖRRIES.
BURROWSEnglish
Variant of Burroughs. A name for someone who lived by a hill or tumulus, also may be a further derivation from Old English bur "bower" and hus "house".
BYAMEnglish
Probably means "person from Bytham", Lincolnshire ("homestead in a valley bottom"). Glen Byam Shaw (1904-1986) was a British theatre director.
BYBERGSwedish
Swedish ornamental name. A combination of Swedish by "village" and berg "mountain".
BYLINSwedish
A combination of Swedish by "village" and the suffix -in, derived from Latin -inus, -inius "descendant of"
BYLUNDSwedish
Combination of Swedish by "village" and lund "grove".
BYREEnglish
Probably derived from Old English bȳre "farm, barn".
BYSTEDTSwedish
A combination of Swedish by "village" and German stedt "home, place".
CACCIATOREItalian
Derived from Italian cacciatore meaning "hunter, huntsman", which is ultimately derived from the Italian verb cacciare meaning "to hunt".... [more]
CALLANDERScottish, English, Swedish (Rare)
Habitational name from various places so named in Scotland. ... [more]
CALLENDERScottish
Variant of Scottish CALLANDER or German KALANDER.
CALLENDEREnglish
Occupational name for a person who finished freshly woven cloth by passing it between heavy rollers to compress the weave. From Old Franch calandrier, calandreur.
CANNINGEnglish, Irish (Anglicized), Scottish
Habitational name from a place so named in England. From the Old English byname CANA and -ingas meaning "people of".... [more]
CANTWELLIrish, English
A surname used in the South of England.... [more]
CARGILLScottish, English
Habitational name from a place so named in Scotland.
CARLANDERSwedish
Combination of the given name KARL or Swedish karl "man" and ander, from classical Greek andros, "man".
CARMICHAELScottish, English
Scottish place name meaning "fort of Michael".
CARNEYIrish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Catharnaigh "descendant of Catharnach", a byname meaning "warlike".
CASHIONIrish
Anglicized form of either Mac Caisin or Ó Caisin meaning "descendant of Caisín" (see Cassidy).
CEDERQVISTSwedish
Combination of Swedish ceder "cedar" and kvist "twig, branch".
CELDASpanish (Modern, Rare), Filipino (Modern, Rare)
The Spanish word for 'cell', as in prison cell.
CELSIUSSwedish (Archaic), History
Latinized form of Högen "the mound" (Latin: celsus), the name of a vicarage in Ovanåker parish, Sweden. Celsius is a unit of measurement for temperature named for Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744).
CHATWINEnglish
Old English given name CEATTA combined with Old English (ge)wind "winding ascent".
CHAUDHRYUrdu, Indian, Hindi
Variant transcription of Chaudhary.
CHIAKIJapanese (Rare)
Depending on the kanji used can mean different things. Chi means "thousand" or "wisdom" and aki means "bright", "autumn", "sparkle", "crystal ball" or "shining". This is the last name of Naomi Chiaki, a Japanese singer... [more]
CHILDERSEnglish
Probably a habitational name from some lost place named Childerhouse, from Old English cildra "child" and hus "house". This may have referred to some form of orphanage.
CHINOJapanese (Rare)
Written with characters Chi ("Micanthus Reed") and No ("Feild").
CLAYBERGEnglish
Meaning is unknown, but it most likely means "clay mountain", from surnames Clay "clay" and Berg "mountain".
CLEVELANDNorwegian (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Norwegian Kleiveland or Kleveland, habitational names from any of five farmsteads in Agder and Vestlandet named with Old Norse kleif "rocky ascent" or klefi "closet" (an allusion to a hollow land formation) and land "land".
CONNICKYiddish
Variation on Koenig.
CONRADIGerman, Danish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Derived from a patronymic from the given name Konrad.
CORBETTEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
CORDERFrench (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
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