Dutch Submitted Surnames

Dutch names are used in the Netherlands and Flanders. See also about Dutch names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
OSTERHOUTDutch
From the town of Oosterhout,, meaning "East Wood", as it is located nearby forests in the east of the Netherlands. Primary modern usage is in the United States can be traced back to Jan Jensen van Oosterhoudt, who immigrated to New Amsterdam in the 17th Century, and has been generally been simplified to Osterhout, where the O is pronounced as "AW"... [more]
OUDENHOVENDutch
Derived from Dutch oude "old" and hoeve "farm; farmstead; manor". As a surname it is derived from one of the many places of this name, for example in Menen, Passendale, Steenvoorde, Steenwerk, Broekburg or Godewaardsvelde.
OVERBEEKEDutch
Means "over/on brook" or "over/on stream" or "over/on creek"... [more]
PAVEKDutch
Americanized spelling of PÁVEK.
PELTDutch
Dutch: shortened form of Van Pelt.
PENNINGEnglish, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
PIEPERGerman, Dutch
Occupational name for a piper.
PIETERSDutch
"Pieter's son"
PLUMERGerman, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
POSTLow German, Danish, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived near a post or pole (Middle Low German, Middle Dutch post, from Latin postis), presumably one of some significance, e.g. serving as a landmark or boundary, or a habitational name from any of several places in northern Germany called Post, probably from this word.
POSTHUMUSDutch, Low German
From a personal name which was given to a posthumous child, i.e., one born after the death of his father, derived from Latin postumus "last, last-born" (superlative of posterus "coming after, subsequent") via Late Latin posthumus, which was altered by association with Latin humare "to bury", suggesting death (i.e., thought to consist of post "after" and humus "grave", hence "after death"); the one born after the father's death obviously being the last.
PRIOREnglish, Scottish, Dutch, German
Derived from Latin prior meaning "superior". It was used as an occupational surname for a prior, which is a head of a religious house, below an abbot.
PUDDEPHATTDutch
Form of Cooper, meaning barrell maker
QUACKENBUSHDutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Quackenbosch, a topographic name from Dutch quaak ‘swamp’ (cognate with the English word quagmire) + bosch ‘woodland’, ‘wilderness’.
RAADDutch
Metonymic occupational name for an adviser, counselor, or member of a town council, from raad ‘advice’, ‘counsel’.
RAATDutch
''Somebody who gives good advice'', ''counsel'' Raad = advice.... [more]
REDDINGEnglish, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
REDIGDutch, Upper German
Dutch and North German variant of Redding.
REESELow German, Dutch, German
Nickname for a very big man, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rese ‘giant’.... [more]
REISZDutch
Patronymic from a pet form of one of the Germanic compound names formed with ragin "counsel" as the first element.
REMISGreek, Dutch, German, Asturian
Greek from a medieval Greek personal name, Remis, a vernacular form of the personal name Remigius (see French Remy). ... [more]
RENSDutch
From a reduced form of the personal name Laurens.
ROELEnglish, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name Roeland, meaning "famous country".
ROELFSDutch
Means "son of Roelf".
ROELOFSDutch
Variant of Roelfs, meaning "son of Roelof".
ROLLOOSDutch
Possibly derived from the given name Rollo.
ROMMELUpper German, Dutch
Nickname for an obstreperous person, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rummeln, rumpeln to make a noise, create a disturbance (of imitative origin). Variant of Rummel.
ROOPDutch
Dutch: from a short form of the Germanic personal name Robrecht.
ROOSEstonian, Swedish, Danish, Dutch, German (Swiss), Low German
Means "rose" in Estonian and Dutch. Swedish and Danish variant of Ros, also meaning "rose". This could be a locational name for someone living near roses, an occupational name for someone who grew roses, or a nickname for someone with reddish skin.
ROOTEnglish, Dutch
English: nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English rote ‘glad’ (Old English rot). ... [more]
RUMMELGerman, Dutch
North German and Dutch: variant of Rommel.... [more]
RUTGERSDutch
Patronymic from the Germanic personal name Rutger (see Roger).
SAMISDutch, German
From a pet form of the personal name Samuel.
SAXDutch
Dutch variant of Sas.
SCHADEGerman, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
SCHAUMBURGGerman, Dutch, Belgian
Habitational name from any of the places called Schaumburg or Schauenburg in Germany, or Schauwberg in Brabant, Belgium.
SCHENKELGerman, Dutch, Jewish
German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for someone with long or otherwise notable legs, from Middle High German schenkel, Middle Dutch schenkel, schinkel ‘thigh’, ‘lower leg’, German Schenkel ‘thigh’.
SCHILDGerman, Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or painter of shields, from Middle High German, Middle Dutch schilt "shield".
SCHINKUpper German, Dutch
Nickname for someone with long or otherwise remarkable legs, from Middle High German schinke ‘thigh’, ‘leg’. Compare Schenkel. ... [more]
SCHOENGerman, Jewish, Dutch
German (Schön) nickname for a handsome or pleasant man, from Middle High German schoene ‘fine’, ‘beautiful’; ‘refined’, ‘friendly’, ‘nice’. ... [more]
SCHOENMAKERDutch
Dutch word for "shoemaker."
SCHOLTENDutch (Surinamese)
Schout "sherif"(he who punishes), Son of Scholte (also from Schout)
SCHOTTLANDERGerman, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]
SCHOUTENDutch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Schouten (disambiguation))... [more]
SCHUTTEDutch, Low German
Dutch and North German (Schütte) occupational name for an archer, from Middle Low German schutten ‘to shoot’. Compare German Schuetz.
SCROGGINSDutch
From Holland
SEGERSwedish, English, Dutch
Means "victory" in Swedish. It is also a variant of the English surname SEAGER or derived from the Germanic given name SIGIHERI "victory army".
SEIVERTDutch
Derived from the given name SIVERT.
SHADEEnglish, German, Dutch, Scottish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary, from Old English scead ‘boundary’.nickname for a very thin man, from Middle English schade ‘shadow’, ‘wraith’.... [more]
SIEVERTLow German, Dutch, Swedish
Derived from the given name SIVERT. A Sievert (Sv) is a unit measuring the effect of ionizing radiation on the human body (called equivalent absorbed radiation dose). It was named after Swedish medical physicist Rolf Sievert (1896 – 1966).
SIKKENSDutch (Modern)
Son of Sikke (or Sikko)
SIMScottish, Dutch
Scottish and Dutch: from the personal name Sim, a short form of Simon.
SJOERDSMAFrisian, Dutch
Derived from the Frisian given name Sjoerd combined with the Frisian surname suffix -(s)ma, which is most likely derived from Old Frisian monna meaning "men".... [more]
SLACKEnglish, Dutch, Scottish
English and Dutch: nickname for an idle person, from Middle Dutch slac, Middle English slack, ‘lazy’, ‘careless’. ... [more]
SLUITERDutch
Occupation name for a porter, or gatekeeper. Also an occupational name for someone who made and poured alcohol. "The one who pours the alcohol." - Middle Dutch Sluter. Compare to English Porter.
SNYDERDutch, English, German, Yiddish, Jewish
Means "tailor" in Dutch, an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.... [more]
SOUTHARDEnglish, Dutch
Possibly derived from the English surname SOUTHWORTH.
SPRINGERGerman, English, Dutch, Jewish
Nickname for a lively person or for a traveling entertainer. It can also refer to a descendant of Ludwig der Springer (AKA Louis the Springer), a medieval Franconian count who, according to legend, escaped from a second or third-story prison cell by jumping into a river after being arrested for trying to seize County Saxony in Germany.
STAALDutch (Modern)
From Middle High German stal meaning "steel". May have been a occupational name, for a steelworker or blacksmith.
STARGerman, Dutch, Jewish, English
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname from German Star, Middle High German star, ‘starling’, probably denoting a talkative or perhaps a voracious person.... [more]
STERKENDutch, English
Means "strong". Derived either from the Old English term sterċan, meaning "to make rigid", or from the Old Saxon sterkian and Old High German sterken, both meaning "to strengthen."
STEVENScottish, English, Dutch, North German
From the personal name Steven, a vernacular form of Latin Stephanus, Greek Stephanos "crown". This was a popular name throughout Christendom in the Middle Ages, having been borne by the first Christian martyr, stoned to death at Jerusalem three years after the death of Christ... [more]
STOCKARDScottish Gaelic, Dutch
Scottish: occupational name for a trumpeter, Gaelic stocaire, an agent derivative of stoc ‘Gaelic trumpet’. The name is borne by a sept of the McFarlanes.... [more]
STOKERDutch (Modern)
A Stoker is (or was) someone who stokes (tends to) fires, coals, or furnaces.
STORMEnglish, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian (Rare)
Nickname for a man of blustery temperament, from Middle English, Middle Low German, storm, Old Norse stormr meaning "storm".
STRYCKERDutch
From Dutch de Strycker, an occupational name for someone responsible for measuring out cloth or grain. See also Stryker.
STRYKERDutch
From Dutch Strijker, an occupational name for someone whose job was to fill level measures of grain by passing a flat stick over the brim of the measure, thus removing any heaped excess. Also, possibly an altered spelling of English Striker, or even an Americanized spelling of German Streicher... [more]
STUYVESANTDutch
Dutch surname of unknown meaning. ... [more]
TABAKDutch
Occupational name for a butcher or hog breeder, from Middle Dutch tucbake, from tucken meaning "to pull, push, or strike" + bake meaning "hog".
TAZELAARDutch
Dutch (Zeeland) variant of ’t Hazelaar, topographic name for someone living by hazel bushes.
TEBOWDutch, Belgian, French
From the Old French personal name Teobaud, Tibaut (see Theobald).
TELLINGHUISENDutch
Unexplained; possibly a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
TENEYCKDutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a prominent oak tree, Middle Dutch eyk. This has been a prominent family name in Albany, NY, area since the 1630s.
TIMMGerman, Dutch, English
English: probably from an otherwise unrecorded Old English personal name, cognate with the attested Continental Germanic form Timmo. This is of uncertain origin, perhaps a short form of Dietmar... [more]
TROYEnglish, German, Jewish, French, Dutch
As an English surname, it is a habitational name from Troyes in Aude, France. There was also an Anglo-Norman family of this name in Ireland.... [more]
TUNNARDDutch (Modern)
Often found used in Lincolnshire UK as a surname in farming families.
VAN BEETHOVENFlemish
Means "from the beet fields". A famous bearer of this name was German Clasical composer Ludwig Van Beethoven (1770-1827).
VAN BLANKENBERGDutch, Belgian
Habitational name from any of various places so called, in particular in Hennef and Gelderland, or from Blankenberge in West Flanders, Belgium.
VAN DAMDutch
Van - meaning "from the" or "of the"... [more]
VAN DE MARKDutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a border or boundary, from Middle Dutch marke, merke meaning "boundary", "borderland".
VAN DEN BERGDutch, Afrikaans, Flemish
Meaning "from the mountain".
VAN DEN BOSCHDutch
from the bush or woods
VAN DERDutch
van "from"... [more]
VANDERBILTDutch, German
Topographic name for someone living by a low hill, from Middle Low German bulte "mound", "low hill".
VAN DER KOLKDutch
'van der' means "of the" ... [more]
VAN DER KOOIDutch
name for someone from either of two places, De Kooi in South Holland or De Kooy in North Holland.
VAN DER LEIJDutch
Derived from Dutch lei meaning "slate" (effectively meaning "from the slate"), indicating that the original bearer of this name may have come from a place where slate was produced.
VANDERMASTDutch
Topographic name for someone from a place rich in animal fodder, for example acorns.
VAN DER MEERDutch
Meaning "From the lake"
VAN DER MERWEDutch, South African
While the name is currently very common in South Africa, it originates in Holland, literally meaning "From the Merwe". The first van der Merwes hail from the Merwede river. The name went to South Africa with the Dutch settlers in 1652.
VANDERPANDutch
Means "of the bannner" meaning most likely indicates ancestry of high-ranking occupation.
VANDERPOOLDutch
Means, from the pool. It was a topographic name for someone who lived by a pool or pond, derived from the Dutch word POL. The name is also spelt POHL, POL, POLL, POLS, Van den POLL and POLMAN.
VAN DER STEENDutch, Belgian
Habitational name for someone from any of various minor places called Steen or Ten Stene (from steen meaning "stone"), for example in the Belgian provinces of East Flanders and Brabant.
VAN DER VELDEDutch
Meaning "of the field" from Dutch van -"Of"- der - "The"- and veld - "field".
VAN DIJKDutch
Van Dijk is a Dutch toponymic surname meaning "from (the) dike". With 56,441 people, it was the fifth most common name in the Netherlands in 2007 Abroad, people with this surname usually abandoned the ij digraph, resulting in names like Van Dyke and Van Dyk.
VANDYKEDutch
Topographic name for someone living near a dyke or levee. Dykes are common structures for keeping lands dry in the low lying Netherlands. ... [more]
VAN HAITSMADutch
Habitational name for someone from Haitsma, a place in Friesland.
VAN HEUTSZDutch
A bearer of this name is J.B. van Heutsz, also known as the Pacificator of Aceh, former governor general of the Dutch East Indies.
VAN KLEEFDutch
Van meaning 'of' Kleef is a variant spelling of Kleve: a town in the Lower Rhine region of northwestern Germany near the Dutch border and the River Rhine.
VAN KRIEKENDutch (Rare)
Means "cherry" in Dutch.
VAN LOOKDutch
Topographic name from look ‘enclosure’ or habitational name from a place named with this word.
VANSANTDutch
Derivative of Van Zant.
VAN SLINGERLANDDutch
Habitational name from a place so called in Overijssel.
VAN STAALDUINENDutch
Meaning "Of the Steal Dunes " in Dutch
VAN'T DODEPERSOONDutch
Means "of dead person"
VAN TRISTAANDutch
From Julian Van Tristaan(1995-) professional footballer for Tottenham Hontspurs and Holland.
VAN WORMERDutch
Meaning someone from the city or area of Wormer, Holland
VAN ZANDTDutch, Belgian
Habitational name for someone from any of the places called Zandt, in Gelderland, Friesland, South Holland, and Zeeland; or Zande in Belgium.
VELTENDutch, German
Dutch and German from a vernacular form of the personal name Valentin (see Valentine).
VENEMADutch
Linked to 'veen' or bog. Of the bog.
VERBEEKDutch
Contracted form of Van Der Beek.
VERWEYDutch, Afrikaans, South African
Contracted form of van der Weij meaning "from the meadow".
VILLERIUSDutch
Villerius is a name of Dutch origin similar to the French DeVilliers
VISSERDutch
Means "fisherman" in Dutch.
VOOGDDutch
Name for a bailiff, farm manager, or other personal with supervisory authority, Middle High German voget, Late Latin vocatus, from Latin advocatus, past participle of advocare ‘to call up (to help)’... [more]
VOORHEESDutch
Habitational name from a place in Drenthe called Voorhees.
VOSDutch
From the word vos meaning "fox", it may have been a nickname for someone with fox-like characteristics.
VOSBERGDutch, German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hill frequented by foxes, from Middle Low German vos "fox" and berg "hill", "mountain".
VREESWIJKDutch
Possibly a habitational name from a former village and municipality in the province Utrecht, Netherlands. A notable bearer was Dutch-Swedish singer-songwriter and poet Cornelis Vreeswijk (1937-1987).
VRIEZEDutch
Ethnic name for a Frisian.
WACHTERGerman, Dutch
Occupational name for a watchman, from Middle High German wachtære, wehtære, Middle Dutch wacht(e)re. (cf. WAITE).
WARNSDutch, German
Dutch habitational name from places so named in Friesland and Overijssel. The one in Friesland was the site of a famous victory of Frisians over the Hollanders in the 14th century. ... [more]
WEGDutch
Proper non: Way/road/path
WESTHOUSEDutch
West of the House, originating from the name VeistHuis
WESTONDutch
Diminutive of Westenberg
WINDutch, English, Burmese, Thai
Southeast Asian: unexplained. ... [more]
WINKELGerman, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
WINNEDutch, English
Dutch: occupational name for an agricultural worker, Middle Low German winne ‘peasant’. ... [more]
WITTEDutch
Nickname for someone with white or blonde hair or an unusually pale complexion, from Middle Dutch witte "white".
WONDERGEMDutch
gem cutter or gem setter-jewler
WRIEDTGerman, Dutch
Nickname from Middle Low German wrēt, wrede meaning "fierce", "evil", "angry".
WYCKOFFDutch
name for someone living at the main farm in a district, from Dutch wijk ‘district’ + hof ‘farmstead’, ‘manor farm’.
YOSTAmerican, Dutch, Afrikaans
Americanized spelling of Dutch surname Joost or German surname Jost
ZELLERGerman, Dutch, English, Jewish
Originally denoted someone from Celle, Germany or someone living near a hermit's cell from German zelle "cell". It is also occupational for someone employed at a zelle, for example a small workshop.
ZYLSTRADutch, Frisian, English
Derived from Dutch zijl "canal" or "sluice". Originally indicated someone who lives near a canal or sluice.