Surnames of Length 5

This is a list of surnames in which the length is 5.
usage
length
Küçük Turkish
Means "small" in Turkish.
Kuntz German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Konrad.
Kunze German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Konrad.
Kyler Dutch (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Cuyler.
Kyles Scottish
Variant of Kyle.
Lacey English
Derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name that was Latinized as Lascius.
Lager Swedish
Means "laurel" in Swedish.
Lahti Finnish
Means "bay, cove" in Finnish.
Laine Finnish, Estonian
Means "wave" in Finnish and Estonian.
Laird Scottish
Means "landowner" in Scots, derived from northern Middle English laverd "lord", from Old English hlafweard.
Lamar French, English
Originally from a place name in Normandy, derived from Old French la mare meaning "the pool".
Lamon Italian
From the name of the village of Lamon near the city of Belluno in Veneto, Italy.
Landi Italian
Derived from the given name Lando.
Lando Italian
Derived from the given name Lando.
Lange German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian cognate of Long.
Láník Czech
Derived from Czech lán, a measure of land equal to approximately 18 hectares. The name loosely translates as "farmer" and is considered a Moravian equivalent of Sedlák.
Larue French
Means "the street" in French.
Łaska Polish
Means "grace, mercy" in Polish.
Láska Czech, Slovak
Means "love" in Czech and Slovak.
Lázár Hungarian
From the given name Lázár.
Leach English
Originally indicated a person who was a physician, from the medieval practice of using leeches to bleed people of ills.
Leary Irish
Variant of O'Leary.
Lecce Italian
Originally indicated a person from Lecce, southern Italy. The town was known as Licea or Litium in Latin, earlier Lupiae.
Leigh English
Variant of Lee 1.
Leitz German
Derived from the archaic given name Leutz, a variant of Lutz.
Lemmi Italian
From a short form of the given name Guglielmo. It is typical of Tuscany.
Lenin Russian (Modern)
Surname adopted by the Russian revolutionary and founder of the former Soviet state Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924), whose birth surname was Ulyanov. He probably adapted it from the name of the River Lena in Siberia.
Lenox Scottish
Variant of Lennox.
Leone Italian
Derived from the given name Leone 1.
Leoni Italian
Derived from the given name Leone 1.
Leroy French
Variant of Rey 1, using the definite article.
Leung Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Liang.
Lewin English
Derived from the given name Leofwine.
Lewis 1 English
Derived from the given name Lewis. The author C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) was a bearer of this surname.
Lewis 2 Welsh
Anglicized form of Llywelyn.
Liang Chinese
From Chinese (liáng) referring to the ancient state of Liang, which existed from the 8th to 7th centuries BC in what is now Shaanxi province.
Linna Finnish
Means "castle" in Finnish. A famous namesake is Väinö Linna (1920-1992), Finnish author of The Unknown Soldier.
Lippi Italian
From the given name Filippo. It is common in the area of Florence.
Ljung Swedish
Means "heather" in Swedish.
Lloyd Welsh
Originally a nickname from the Welsh word llwyd meaning "grey".
Loewe German
Variant of Löwe.
Logan Scottish
From a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow", derived from Gaelic lag "hollow, pit".
Loman Dutch
From various place names in the Netherlands, derived from Old Dutch loh meaning "meadow, clearing".
Longo Italian
Italian cognate of Long.
Lopes Portuguese
Means "son of Lopo" in Portuguese.
López Spanish
Means "son of Lope" in Spanish.
Lopez Spanish
Variant of López.
Loris German
Derived from the given name Lorenz.
Louis French
From the given name Louis.
Lovel English
Variant of Lowell.
Lowry English, Scottish
From a diminutive of the given name Laurence 1.
Lucas English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch
Derived from the given name Lucas. A famous bearer of this surname is George Lucas (1944-), the creator of the Star Wars movies.
Lučić Croatian, Serbian
Means "son of Luka".
Lukić Serbian
Means "son of Luka".
Lunde Norwegian
Variant of Lund.
Lungu Romanian
Romanian cognate of Long.
Lupei Romanian
Variant of Lupu.
Lyall Scottish
From the Old Norse given name Liulfr, which was derived in part from úlfr "wolf".
Lykke Danish
Means "happiness" in Danish.
Lynch Irish
From Irish Ó Loingsigh meaning "descendant of Loingseach", a given name meaning "mariner".
Lyons English
Variant of Lyon 1.
Macar Turkish
Means "Hungarian" in Turkish.
Macek Czech
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Matěj.
Macey English
Variant of Massey.
Maçon French
French cognate of Mason.
Maeda Japanese
From Japanese (mae) meaning "front, forward" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Magee Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Mac Aodha.
Magro Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From a nickname meaning "thin, lean", ultimately from Latin macer.
Maina Eastern African, Kikuyu
Derived from the given name Maina.
Manco Italian
Means "left-handed" in Italian, derived from Latin mancus meaning "maimed".
Marco Spanish, Italian
From the given name Marco.
Mårdh Swedish
From Swedish mård meaning "pine marten".
Marek Polish, Czech, Slovak
Derived from the given name Marek.
María Spanish
From the given the name María.
Maria Italian, Portuguese
From the given the name Maria.
Marić Croatian, Serbian
Means "son of Marija".
Marie French
From the given name Marie.
Marín Spanish
Derived from the given name Marino.
Marin Romanian, French
From the given name Marin.
Markó Hungarian
Derived from the given name Márk.
Marmo Italian
Means "marble" in Italian, possibly indicating a person who lived near a quarry or one who worked with marble.
Marsh English
Originally denoted one who lived near a marsh or bog, derived from Old English mersc "marsh".
Martí Catalan
Derived from the given name Martí.
Martz German
Derived from an old diminutive of Martin.
Mašek Czech
Derived from the given name Mašek, which can be a diminutive of either Matěj or Tomáš.
Masin Italian
Venetian variant of Masi.
Mason English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, ultimately of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
Matei Romanian
Derived from the given name Matei.
Mateu Catalan
Derived from the given name Mateu.
Matić Croatian
Means "son of Matija".
Mayer 3 English
Occupational name for a mayor, from Middle English mair, derived via Old French from Latin maior.
Mayes English
Patronymic form of May.
Mazur Polish
Indicated a person from either Mazovia (Polish Mazowsze) or Masuria (Polish Mazury), regions in Poland.
Mazza Italian
From a nickname (perhaps occupational) meaning "maul, mallet" in Italian.
McCoy Scottish
Anglicized form of MacAoidh.
McFee Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of MacDhubhshìth.
McFly Popular Culture
Invented name, using the prefix Mc-, from Irish mac "son", and the English word fly. This name was created for the time-travelling hero Marty McFly of the Back to the Future movie series, beginning 1985.
McGee Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Mac Aodha.
McKay Scottish
Anglicized form of MacAoidh.
McKee Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Aodha.
McNab Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Aba meaning "son of the abbot".
McNee Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Niadh.
McRae Scottish
From Gaelic Mag Raith meaning "son of Rath", a given name meaning "prosperity" or "grace".
Mejía Spanish
Possibly from a nickname derived from Spanish Mesías meaning "Messiah", from Latin Messias, ultimately from Biblical Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ (mashiyach) meaning "anointed".
Merle French
French form of Merlo.
Merlo Italian, Spanish
Means "blackbird", ultimately from Latin merula. The blackbird is a symbol of a naive person.
Meyer 1 German
From Middle High German meier meaning "bailiff, administrator", derived from Latin maior meaning "greater". Later it also denoted a tenant farmer. The spellings Meier and Meyer are more common in northern Germany while Maier and Mayer are more common in southern Germany.
Meyer 2 Jewish
From Hebrew מֵאִיר (meir) meaning "enlightened".
Mihov Bulgarian
Means "son of Miho", the given name Miho being a diminutive of Mihail.
Miles English
From the given name Miles.
Milić Serbian, Croatian
Means "son of Mile".
Mills English
Originally given to one who lived near a mill or who worked in a mill, from Middle English mille.
Milne Scottish
From Scots and Middle English milne (a variant of mille) meaning "mill".
Mingo Spanish
From the given name Domingo.
Misra Indian, Hindi
Alternate transcription of Hindi मिश्र (see Mishra).
Miura Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "three" and (ura) meaning "bay, inlet".
Mohan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Mocháin meaning "descendant of Mochán".
Moles Catalan
From Catalan mola meaning "millstone".
Mondo Italian
From a given name, a short form of names such as Raimondo or Edmondo.
Monet French
Derived from either of the given names Hamon or Edmond. A famous bearer was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
Monte Italian
Variant of Monti.
Monti Italian
Means "mountain, hill" in Italian.
Moore 1 English
Originally indicated a person who lived on a moor, from Middle English mor meaning "open land, bog".
Moore 2 English
Derived from the given name Maurus.
Moore 3 English
Nickname for a person of dark complexion, from Old French more, Latin maurus, meaning "Moorish".
Moors English
Variant of Moore 1.
Morce English
Variant of Morriss.
Morel French
Derived from a diminutive of Maurus.
Morin English
Variant of Moore 2 and Moore 3.
Morra Italian
Locative name derived from Italian places such as Morra De Sanctis, Campania, or Morra del Villar, Piedmont.
Morse English
Variant of Morriss.
Moser German
Name for someone who lived near a peat bog, from Middle High German mos.
Moses Jewish, English
Derived from the given name Moses.
Motta Italian
From various names of places around Italy. It is derived from a Gaulish word meaning "hill".
Mould English
From the given name Mauld, a medieval form of Matilda.
Muñoz Spanish
Patronymic derived from the medieval Spanish given name Muño, from Latin Munnius, possibly of Germanic origin.
Munro Scottish
Designated a person who had originally lived near the mouth of the Roe River in Derry, Ireland. It is derived from Gaelic bun meaning "root, base" combined with the river's name.
Musil Czech
Possibly from a nickname meaning "the one who had to", from the past participle of the verb muset meaning "must" (of Germanic origin).
Myers English
Patronymic form of Mayer 3.
Myles English
From the given name Miles.
Myška Czech
From nickname derived from Czech myš meaning "mouse".
Naaji Arabic
From the given name Naaji.
Nacar Turkish
Turkish form of Najjar.
Næss Norwegian
Variant of Ness.
Naess Norwegian
Variant of Ness.
Nagel German, Dutch
Means "nail" in German and Dutch, an occupational name for a carpenter or nailsmith.
Naggi Italian
Originally denoted a person from the town of Naggio in Lombardy, Italy.
Nakai Japanese
From Japanese (naka) meaning "middle" and (i) meaning "well, mine shaft, pit".
Naldi Italian
From given names like Arnaldo and Rinaldo.
Nanni Italian
Variant of Nana.
Nardi Italian
From the given name Nardo, which was originally a short form of names like Bernardo or Leonardo.
Nardo Italian
Variant of Nardi.
Negri Italian
Nickname derived from Italian negro "black", used to refer to someone with dark hair or dark skin.
Nejem Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic نجم (see Najm).
Nelli Italian
Derived from the given name Nello.
Němec Czech
Means "German" in Czech.
Nemes Hungarian
Means "noble, gentle" in Hungarian.
Nenci Italian
Means "son of Nencio", a Tuscan diminutive of the name Lorenzo.
Nervi Italian
From the name of the town of Nervi in Liguria, northwestern Italy.
Nevin 1 Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Naoimhín.
Niemi Finnish
Means "peninsula, cape" in Finnish.
Nieri Italian
Either a variant of Neri, or from the Italian name Raniero.
Nieto Spanish
From a nickname meaning "grandson" in Spanish.
Nigel English
Derived from the given name Neil.
Nigro Italian
Variant of Negri.
Niles English
Means "son of Neil".
Niven Scottish
Anglicized form of Mac Naoimhín.
Nixon English
Means "son of Nick". A famous bearer was the American president Richard Nixon (1913-1994).
Nolan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of Nuallán".
North English
Name for a person who lived to the north.
Nørup Danish
From the name of Danish villages named Nørup or Norup.
Norup Danish
Variant of Nørup.
Nosek Czech, Polish
Means "small nose" in Czech and Polish.
Novák Czech, Slovak, Hungarian
Czech, Slovak and Hungarian form of Novak.
Novak Slovene, Croatian, Serbian
Derived from Slavic novy "new", originally a name for someone who was new to a village.
Novik Belarusian
From Belarusian новы (novy) meaning "new".
Nowak Polish
Polish cognate of Novak. This is the most common surname in Poland.
Noyer French
French form of Nogueira.
Nunes Portuguese
Means "son of Nuno".
Núñez Spanish
Spanish form of Nunes.
Nurmi Finnish
Means "meadow, field" in Finnish. It was the surname of the athlete Paavo Nurmi (1897-1973).
Obama Eastern African, Luo
From a rare Luo given name meaning "crooked, bent". It was possibly originally given to a baby who had an arm or leg that looked slightly bent immediately after birth or who was born in the breech position.
Ochoa Spanish
Spanish form of Otxoa.
Odell English
Originally denoted a person who was from Odell in Bedfordshire, derived from Old English wad "woad" (a plant that produces a blue dye) and hyll "hill".
Ogawa Japanese
From Japanese (o) meaning "small" and (kawa) meaning "river, stream".
Ogden English
From a place name derived from Old English ac "oak" and denu "valley".
O'Hara Irish
From the Irish Ó hEaghra, which means "descendant of Eaghra", Eaghra being a given name of uncertain origin. Supposedly, the founder of the clan was Eaghra, a 10th-century lord of Luighne. A famous fictional bearer of this surname is Scarlett O'Hara, a character in Margaret Mitchell's Gone With The Wind (1936).
Ojeda Spanish
From the name of the Ojeda river in Soria, Spain, possibly derived from Latin folia "leaves".
Okabe Japanese
From Japanese (oka) meaning "hill, ridge" and (be) meaning "part, section".
O'Kane Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Catháin.
Okeke Western African, Igbo
From the given name Okeke.
Olasz Hungarian
Means "Italian" in Hungarian, from old Slavic volhu "Romance-speaker" (of Germanic origin).
Olmos Spanish
Variant of Olmo.
Olsen Norwegian, Danish
Means "son of Ole".
O'Neal Irish
From Irish Ó Néill meaning "descendant of Neil".
Oomen Dutch
Patronymic derived from Middle Dutch oom meaning "(maternal) uncle".
Orbán Hungarian
Derived from the given name Orbán.
Ó Rinn Irish
Means "descendant of Rinn". The given name Rinn means "star" in Irish.
Oriol Catalan
From Catalan or meaning "gold", originally a nickname for a person with blond hair.
Orlov Russian
Patronymic derived from the Russian nickname Орёл (Oryol) meaning "eagle".
Orman Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Ruaidh.
Orosz Hungarian
Means "Russian" in Hungarian.
Ortiz Spanish
Means "son of Orti", a byname deriving either from Latin fortis meaning "brave, strong" or fortunius meaning "fortunate".
O'Shea Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Séaghdha.
Øster Danish
From Danish øst meaning "east", originally denoting a dweller on the eastern side of a place.
Otero Spanish
Means "hill, knoll, height" in Spanish.
Otten Dutch
Means "son of Otto".
Otxoa Basque
From Basque otso meaning "wolf".
Owens Welsh
From the Welsh given name Owain.
Ozols Latvian
Means "oak tree" in Latvian.
Pabst German
From German Papst, a cognate of Pope.
Paget English, French
Diminutive of Page.
Paige English
Variant of Page.
Panza Italian, Literature
From a variant of the Italian word pancia meaning "stomach, paunch", originally a nickname for a chubby person. The Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes used it in his novel Don Quixote (1605), where it is the surname of Don Quixote's squire Sancho Panza. Not a common Spanish surname, Cervantes may have based it directly on the Spanish word panza (a cognate of the Italian word).
Papke Low German
Low German diminutive form of papa (see Pope).
Pardo Spanish
Means "brown" in Spanish, originally a nickname for someone with brown hair.
Parks English
Patronymic form of Park 3.
Parma Italian
From the city of Parma in northern Italy, the name of which is probably of Etruscan origin.
Parri Italian
From the given name Gaspare.
Parry Welsh
Derived from ap Harry meaning "son of Harry".
Patel Indian, Gujarati
Means "landowner" in Gujarati.
Patil Indian, Marathi
Means "village chief" in Marathi.
Pavía Spanish
Spanish form of Pavia.
Pavia Italian
From the name of the city of Pavia in Lombardy, Italy. It is of unknown meaning.
Pavić Croatian
Means "son of Pavle".
Payne English
From a medieval given name or nickname derived from Latin paganus meaning "heathen, pagan" (from an earlier sense "rural, rustic"), which was given to children whose baptism had been postponed or adults who were not overly religious.
Pellé French
From French pelé meaning "bald".
Penny English
Nickname meaning "penny, coin" from Old English penning.
Pérez Spanish
Means "son of Pedro" in Spanish.
Perez Spanish
Variant of Pérez.
Perić Croatian, Serbian
Means "son of Pero".
Perko Slovene, Croatian
Derived from an archaic diminutive of Peter.
Perry 1 English
From Old English pirige meaning "pear tree", a derivative of peru meaning "pear", itself from Latin pirum. A famous bearer was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
Perry 2 Welsh
From Welsh ap Herry meaning "son of Herry".
Pesce Italian
Means "fish" in Italian, referring either to a fisherman or to a person who resembled a fish in some way.
Pešek Czech
From a diminutive of the given name Petr.
Pesti Hungarian
Originally it indicated someone from Pest, one of the towns that were joined to make Budapest.
Pesty Hungarian
Variant of Pesti.
Péter Hungarian
Derived from the given name Péter.
Peter English, German, Dutch
Derived from the given name Peter.
Petit French, Catalan, English
Means "small, little" derived from Old French and Catalan petit. It was perhaps used for a short, small person or to denote the younger of two individuals.
Petri Italian
Derived from the given name Pietro.
Peura Finnish
Means "deer" in Finnish.
Pfaff German
From a nickname meaning "priest, cleric" from Old High German pfaffo, from Latin papa.
Pinho Portuguese
Habitational name meaning "pine" in Portuguese.
Pinto Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Means "mottled" in Portuguese, Spanish and Italian, derived from Late Latin pinctus, Latin pictus "painted".
Piper English
Originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute).
Pitts English
Indicated a person who lived by a pit or hollow, from Old English pytt. It could also indicate a person from Pitt (Hants) or Pett (East Sussex) in England.
Plank German, English
Means "plank", from Old French, itself from Late Latin planca. This could have referred to a person who lived by a plank bridge over a stream, someone who was thin, or a carpenter.
Platt English
From Old French plat meaning "flat, thin", from Late Latin plattus, from Greek πλατύς (platys) meaning "wide, broad, flat". This may have been a nickname or a topographic name for someone who lived near a flat feature.
Poggi Italian
Variant of Poggio.
Polák Czech
Means "Pole, person from Poland" in Czech.
Poole English
From Old English pol meaning "pool", referring to a person who lived by a small body of water.
Popov Russian, Bulgarian
Means "son of the priest", derived from Russian and Bulgarian поп (pop).
Porra Catalan
Variant of Porras.
Porto Italian
Designated a person who lived near a harbour, from Italian porto, Latin portus.
Pound English
Occupational name for a person who kept animals, from Old English pund "animal enclosure".
Power 1 English, Irish
From Old French Poier, indicating a person who came from the town of Poix in Picardy, France.
Power 2 English
From Middle English povre meaning "poor", via Old French from Latin pauper. It could have been a nickname for someone who had no money or a miser.
Pozzi Italian
From Italian pozzo meaning "well, pit", derived from Latin puteus.
Pratt English
From Old English prætt meaning "trick, prank". This was a nickname for a trickster.
Price Welsh
Derived from Welsh ap Rhys, which means "son of Rhys".
Prinz German, Jewish
Means "prince", used as an ornamental name by Jews or as a nickname for someone who acted in a princely manner.
Protz German
From a nickname meaning "showy, pompous", derived from an old southern German word meaning "toad".
Pryce Welsh
Variant of Price.
Pryor English
Originally belonged to one who was a prior (a religious official), or one who worked for a prior.
Putin Russian
From Russian путь (put) meaning "road, path". This surname is borne by the Russian president Vladimir Putin (1952-).
Qadir Arabic
Derived from the given name Qadir.
Queen English
From a given name that was derived from Old English cwen meaning "queen, woman". In some occurrences it may have been a nickname.
Quick English
Nickname for a quick or agile person, ultimately from Old English cwic meaning "alive".
Quigg Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cuaig meaning "descendant of Cuaig", a given name of unknown meaning.
Quinn Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of Conn".
Quirk Irish
Variant of Quirke.
Radev Bulgarian
Means "son of Rade", a diminutive of Radoslav, Radomir, or other names beginning with рад (rad).
Radić Serbian, Croatian
Patronymic derived from the given name Rade.
Ragno Italian
From a nickname meaning "spider" in Italian.
Rains English
Variant of Raines.
Rakes English
Variant of Rake.
Ramos Spanish
Originally indicated a person who lived in a thickly wooded area, from Latin ramus meaning "branch".
Ranta Finnish
Originally indicated a person who lived near the shore, from Finnish ranta meaning "shore, beach".
Rasch German
German form of Rask.
Ratti Italian
From Italian ratto meaning "rat", originally denoting a sly individual.
Rayne English, French
Derived from a Germanic name that was short for longer names beginning with the element ragin meaning "advice, counsel".
Ready 1 English
From Middle English redi meaning "prepared, prompt".
Ready 2 Scottish
Originally denoted a person from Reedie farm in Angus, Scotland.