Surnames of Length 5

This is a list of surnames in which the length is 5.
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SOBEL Jewish
Variant of SOBOL.
SOBÓL Polish
Polish cognate of SOBOL.
SOBOL Russian, Ukrainian, Jewish
Occupational name for a fur trader, from the Slavic word soboli meaning "sable, marten". As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKAL Polish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKÓŁ Polish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKOL Czech, Jewish
From Czech sokol meaning "falcon", a nickname or an occupational name for a falconer. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOLAK Turkish
From the nickname solak meaning "left-handed".
SOLER Occitan, Catalan
Denoted a person from any of the numerous places in the area whose names derive from Occitan or Catalan soler meaning "ground, floor".
SOLOS Basque
Possibly a variant of SOLO.
SOMMA Italian
From the names of Italian places like Somma Lombardo or Somma Vesuviana, derived from Latin summa meaning "summit".
SORDI Italian
From Italian sordo meaning "deaf", from Latin surdus.
SORGE German
Means "worry, care, anxiety" in German, from Old High German sorga.
SÖRÖS Hungarian
From Hungarian sör meaning "beer". Originally the name was given to beer brewers.
SOUCY French
Originally denoted someone from French towns by this name in Aisne or Yonne, both derived from the Latin name Suciacum.
SOURD French
French cognate of SORDI.
SOUSA Portuguese
Originally indicated someone who lived near the River Sousa in Portugal, possibly derived from Latin salsus "salty" or saxa "rocks".
SÓWKA Polish
From a diminutive of Polish sowa meaning "owl".
SPADA Italian
Occupational name for an armourer or swordsman, from Italian spada "sword", Latin spatha.
SPANÒ Sicilian
From Sicilian spanu meaning "sparse, thin hair", ultimately from Greek σπανιος (spanios) meaning "scarce, rare".
SPEAR English
From Old English spere "spear", an occupational name for a hunter or a maker of spears, or a nickname for a thin person.
SPINI Italian
Denoted a person who lived near thorn bushes, from Italian spina "thorn, spine", from Latin.
SPITZ German
Means "sharp" in German, indicating the original bearer lived near a pointed hill.
STACK English
From a nickname for a big person, derived from Middle English stack "haystack", of Old Norse origin.
STACY English
Derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE.
STAMP English
Originally denoted a person from Étampes near Paris. It was called Stampae in Latin, but the ultimate origin is uncertain.
STARK English, German
From a nickname meaning "strong, rigid", from Old English stearc or Old High German stark.
STARR English
From Middle English sterre meaning "star". This was usually a nickname, but it could also occasionally be a sign name from the name of an inn called the Star.
STEED English
Occupational name for one who tended horses, derived from Middle English steed, in turn derived from Old English steda meaning "stallion".
STEEN Low German
Low German variant of STEIN.
STEIN German, Jewish
From Old High German stein meaning "stone". It might indicate the original bearer lived near a prominent stone or worked as a stonecutter. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
STERN (1) English
From Old English styrne meaning "stern, severe". This was used as a nickname for someone who was stern, harsh, or severe in manner or character.
STERN (2) German, Jewish
German cognate of STARR.
STILO Italian
Derived from the name of the town of Stilo in southern Italy. It is possibly derived from Greek στυλος (stylos) meaning "column, pillar".
STONE English
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or worked with stone, derived from Old English stan.
STÜCK German, Jewish
From Old High German stucki meaning "piece, part".
STURM German
Means "storm" in German, originally a nickname for a volatile person.
SUCHÝ Czech
Means "dry" in Czech. This was a nickname for a thin person.
SUERO Spanish
Derived from the given name SUERO.
SUESS German
Variant of SÜß. A famous bearer was the American children's author Dr. Seuss (1904-1991), who was born Theodor Seuss Geisel.
SWEET English
From a nickname meaning "sweet, pleasant", from Old English swete.
SZABÓ Hungarian
Means "tailor" in Hungarian.
SZEWC Polish
Means "shoemaker" in Polish.
SZŐKE Hungarian
Means "blond, fair haired" in Hungarian.
SZŰCS Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "furrier" in Hungarian.
SZWED Polish
Variant of SZWEDA.
TAMÁS Hungarian
Derived from the given name TAMÁS.
TANZI Italian
From a short form of the given name COSTANZO.
TAPIA Spanish
Means "mud wall" in Spanish.
TASSE French
From Old French tasse "purse, bag", an occupational name for a maker or seller of purses.
TATUM English
Variant of TATHAM.
TAUBE German
From a nickname meaning meaning "dove" in German.
TERRY English
Derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of THEODORIC.
TERZI Italian
From the given name TERZO, or a name for a third child.
TERZİ Turkish
Means "tailor" in Turkish, ultimately of Persian origin.
TESAŘ Czech
Means "carpenter" in Czech, ultimately from the Slavic word tesla meaning "adze".
TESTA Italian
From an Italian nickname meaning "head".
THORN English, Danish
Originally applied to a person who lived in or near a thorn bush.
TIFFT English
Variant of TOFT.
TIGHE Irish
Anglicized form of Ó TAIDHG.
TİLKİ Turkish
From a nickname meaning "fox" in Turkish.
TÍMÁR Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "tanner" in Hungarian.
TISZA Hungarian
From the river name Tisza, Hungary's second largest river.
TOBIN English
From a diminutive of the given name TOBIAS.
TOMÀS Catalan
Derived from the given name TOMÀS.
TOMOV Bulgarian
Means "son of TOMA (2)".
TOOLE Irish
Variant of O'TOOLE.
TÖRÖK Hungarian
Means "Turkish" in Hungarian.
TOSET Catalan
Catalan form of TOSI.
TOSTO Italian
From a nickname for a tough, stubborn person, from Italian tosto "hard, tough".
TRASK English
Originally indicated a person from Thirsk, North Yorkshire, derived from Old Norse þresk meaning "fen, marsh".
TRENT English
Denoted one who lived near the River Trent in England.
TRUDU Sardinian
Means "thrush" in Sardinian (from Latin turdus).
TYLER English
Occupational name for a tiler of roofs, derived from Old English tigele "tile". A famous bearer of this name was American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
TYSON (1) English
Derived from a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French tison meaning "firebrand".
UBIÑA Basque
Possibly a variant of URBINA.
UNGUR Romanian
Romanian form of UNGARO.
UNKLE German
Possibly denoted a person from the town of Unkel in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.
UNRUH German
Refers to a restless, fidgety, nervous person, from German unruhe meaning "unrest".
UPTON English
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many towns in England bearing this name. The place name itself is derived from Old English upp "up" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
UREÑA Spanish
Probably derived from the name of Urueña, a town in the province of Valladolid, Spain, which is of unknown meaning.
UTKIN Russian
From the Russian word утка (utka) meaning "duck".
VACCA Italian
Means "cow" in Italian, originally denoting a person who worked with cattle.
VACEK Czech
Derived from the given name VÁCLAV.
VACÍK Czech
Derived from the given name VÁCLAV.
VADAS Hungarian
From Hungarian vad meaning "wild", either a nickname or an occupational name for a hunter of wild game.
VÁMOS Hungarian
Means "customs officer" in Hungarian, a derivative of vám "customs".
VAN AS Dutch
Means "from Asch", a town in the Netherlands, meaning "ash tree".
VANCE English
Indicated a dweller by a fen, from Old English fenn meaning "fen, marsh".
VANĚK Czech
From an archaic diminutive of the given name VÁCLAV.
VANEV Bulgarian
Means "son of Ivan" in Bulgarian.
VARGA Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "cobbler" in Hungarian.
VAŠEK Czech
Derived from the given name VAŠEK.
VÁVRA Czech
Derived from the given name Vávra, a diminutive of VAVŘINEC.
VERES Hungarian
Dialectical variant of VÖRÖS.
VESPA Italian
From an Italian nickname meaning "wasp".
VIETH German
From the given name VEIT.
VILAR Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Means "hamlet, farm" in Portuguese, Galician and Catalan, from Late Latin villare, a derivative of Latin villa.
VILLA Italian, Spanish
Means "town" in Italian and Spanish, from Latin. It was originally given to a person who came from a town, as opposed to the countryside.
VINCI (1) Italian
From the given name VINCENTE.
VINCI (2) Italian
Originally indicated a person from Vinci near Florence, the birthplace of Leonardo da Vinci.
VIOLA Italian
From the given name VIOLA.
VIRÁG Hungarian
From a nickname meaning "flower" in Hungarian.
VIRGO English
Possibly from Latin virgo "virgin, maiden". It may have been a nickname for an actor who played the Virgin Mary in mystery plays, or for a shy man or a lecher.
VIVAS Catalan
From the Catalan byname vivas meaning "may you live", which was bestowed upon children to bring good luck.
VIVES Catalan
Variant of VIVAS.
VLČEK Czech
Diminutive form of Czech vlk meaning "wolf".
VOGEL German, Dutch
From Old High German and Old Dutch fogal meaning "bird". It was originally an occupational name for a bird catcher, or a nickname for a person who liked to sing.
VOGTS German
Patronymic variant of VOGT.
VOIGT German
Variant of VOGT.
VÖRÖS Hungarian
Means "red" in Hungarian, referring to a person with red hair or face.
VROOM Dutch, Flemish
From a nickname derived from Dutch vroom meaning "pious, devout".
WALSH English, Irish
From Old English wælisc meaning "foreigner, stranger, Celt".
WALTZ German
From a diminutive of the given name WALTHER.
WATTS English
Patronymic derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WAYNE English
Occupational name meaning "wagon maker, cartwright", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". A famous bearer was the American actor John Wayne (1907-1979).
WEBER German
German cognate of WEAVER (1).
WEISS German
From Middle High German wiz meaning "white". This was originally a nickname for a person with white hair or skin.
WEIß German
Variant of WEISS.
WELCH English
Variant of WALSH.
WELLS English
Derived from Middle English welle meaning "well, spring, water hole".
WHITE English
Originally a nickname for a person who had white hair or a pale complexion, from Old English hwit "white".
WIECK German
Means "village, town", derived from Latin vicus.
WILEY English
From any of the various English towns named WILLEY or from the River WYLYE.
WILMS Dutch
Derived from the given name WILLEM.
WIRTH German, Jewish
Occupational name for an innkeeper, derived from German wirt meaning "host".
WOJDA Polish
Variant of WOJEWODA.
WOLFE English
Variant of WOLF.
WRONA Polish
Derived from Polish wrona meaning "crow".
WRUCK German
From Middle Low German wrok meaning "cantankerous".
WYATT English
From the medieval given name WYOT.
WYMAN English
From the Old English given name WIGMUND.
WYNNE English
Derived from the given name WINE.
YANCY Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized form of JANSEN.
YANEV Bulgarian
Means "son of Yane", a diminutive of YOAN (2).
YATES English
From Old English geat meaning "gate", a name for a gatekeeper or someone who lived near a gate.
YEUNG Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of YANG.
YOUNG English
Derived from Old English geong meaning "young". This was a descriptive name to distinguish father from son.
YOUNT German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of JUNDT.
ZĄBEK Polish
From Polish zab "tooth" and a diminutive suffix.
ZAMAN Arabic, Urdu
Derived from the given name ZAMAN.
ZAPPA Italian
From Italian zappa meaning "hoe, mattock", probably denoting a farmer. Two musicians of Italian origin have bore this name: Francesco Zappa (1717-1803) and Frank Zappa (1940-1993).
ZEMAN Czech
Means "landowner", derived from Czech zem "land". A famous bearer is the soccer coach Zdeněk Zeman (1947-).
ZHANG Chinese
From Chinese (zhāng) meaning "stretch, extend". It may have denoted a bowmaker whose job it was to stretch bow wood.
ZHENG Chinese
From Chinese (zhèng), which refers to the ancient state of Zheng. Zheng existed between the 9th to 4th centuries BC in present-day Henan province. A famous bearer of this surname was the 15th-century explorer Zheng He.
ZORIĆ Serbian, Croatian
Means "son of ZORA".
ŽUPAN Croatian
Croatian cognate of ZUPAN.
ZUPAN Slovene
From Slavic župan meaning "head of the district, community leader".
ŻURAW Polish
Means "crane" in Polish, a nickname for a tall person.