Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is jenna.lucille.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AERTSZ Dutch, Frisian
A Patronymic surname from Aert, a shortened form of the first name Arnout.
BARNEWALL Anglo-Norman, Irish
A locational surname given to those who lived by a stream in either Cambridgeshire, which derives its name from the Olde English beorna meaning "warrior" and wella meaning "stream", or from one in Northamptonshire, which got its name from the Olde English byrge meaning "burial mound" and well, which also means "stream." a burial mound and 'well(a)'... [more]
BERGMARK Swedish
Combination of Swedish berg "mountain, hill" and mark "land, ground, field".
BLISS Medieval English, Medieval English (Anglicized)
Originally a nickname for a cheerful person, derived from the Old English blisse, meaning "gladness" or "joy." Another origin of the surname is habitional, coming from from the village of Blay in Calvados (modern-day Normandy), spelled as Bleis in 1077, or from the village of Stoke Bliss in Worcestershire, first known as Stoke de Blez, named after the Norman family de Blez.... [more]
BOBECK Swedish, German, Jewish, Slavic
A respelling of the Swedish Bobäck, an ornamental name composed of the elements bo meaning "farm" and bäck meaning "stream".... [more]
BODILY Anglo-Saxon
A habitational name from the parish of Budleigh, near Exeter in Devon or Baddeley Green in Staffordshire. From the Old English budda, meaning "beetle" and leah, meaning "wood" or "clearing", also known as a glade... [more]
BUDD English
Originated from the Old English personal name Budda, from the word budda, which means "beetle" or "to swell." Specifically of Celtic Welsh origin.
BURNELL Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
A name for a person with a brown complexion or dark brown hair. From the Old English burnel via the French brunel a diminutive of the French brun, which means "brown". The suffix el-- a short form of "little" was added to brun to make Brunel... [more]
CATTELL Anglo-Saxon, French, Ancient Scandinavian
Originated in Scandinavia as a patronym of the first name Thurkettle, a derivative of the Olde Norse name Arnkell, which is composed of arn meaning "eagle" and ketil meaning "a helmet" or "a helmeted warrior" as well as "cauldron", but helmet is the more likely translation... [more]
CHARNOCK English (Rare)
The locational surname originates from two places, Charnock Richard and Heath Charnock, which are both located in Lancashire, England.... [more]
CONANT Ancient Celtic, Pictish
A patronym from the ancient Celtic personal name Conan, which derives from the Celtic kunovals meaning "high" and "mighty".... [more]
COULLSON Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Rare), English
All origins of the name are patronymic. Meanings include an Anglicized version of the Gaelic MacCumhaill, meaning "son of Cumhall", which means "champion" and "stranger and an Anglicized patronymic of the Gaelic MacDhubhghaill, meaning "son of Dubhgall." The personal name comes from the Gaelic words dubh, meaning "black" and gall, meaning "stranger."... [more]
CRIVELLI Italian
From the Italian crivello, which is derived from the Latin cribrum, meaning "sieve," (a mesh food strainer); likely an occupational name for a maker or user of sieves.
CUMBA Gaulish
A topographic name from Gaulish cumba meaning "narrow valley" or a habitational name for a village associated with this name (see Coombe).
DE METZ Medieval Jewish, Medieval French
A medieval Ashkenazic French habitational name originally meaning "of Metz", from the city of Metz (now known as Mettis) in Lorraine, which was originally known as Mediomatrica, after the Gaulish tribe of the Mediomatrici... [more]
ELFORD Medieval English
From the Old English personal name Ella, from the word oelf meaning "elf" or from the Old English alor/elre, meaning "alder tree." The name in full would mean "alder tree by a ford" or "Ella who lives by a ford".... [more]
FLANNER English
This early occupational and mainly 'midlands' English surname, is actually of pre-medieval French origins. Introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest of 1066, it derives from the French word flaonet meaning a 'little flan', and described a maker of patisserie or pancakes.
GASCOYNE English
Variant of GASCOIGNE, which was originally a regional name for someone from the province of Gascony, via Old French Gascogne.
GEISELHART German (Silesian, Rare), Ancient Germanic (Lombardic, Rare), Old High German (Rare)
Possibly after the Geisel, a river in Saxony-Anhalt, which likely received its name from either the Lombardic patronym Giso, meaning "noble, precious promise" or from the Old High German gewi, from the Gothic gavi, or gaujis, a which is a medieval term for a "region within a country", often a former or actual province combined with the suffix Hart, which means "stag", and comes from the Middle English hert and the Old English heort.... [more]
JONSDOTTER Swedish
Literally meaning "Jon's daughter" in Swedish.
LILJEMAN Swedish (Rare)
From the Swedish lilja meaning "lily" and the suffix man meaning "man."
LIPPINCOTT English
A habitational name meaning "of Luffincott," a parish in Devon, England. Named from Old English uncertain first element + cot ‘cottage’.
LYNDE Scottish Gaelic
Originated from the Strathclyde region of Scotland, meaning "waterfall," and located near the Castle of Lin.... [more]
MIODOWNIK Polish, Jewish
The literal translation is "honey cake", from the Polish word/root surname miod, meaning "honey." An occupational surname to those in the honey business, mainly beekeepers and bakers.... [more]
NOTTINGHAM English (British)
A habitational name from the city of Nottingham in the East Midlands. Comes from the Old English name, meaning "homestead (ham) of Snot’s people". The initial S- was lost in the 12th century, due to the influence of Anglo-Norman French.... [more]
ORRELS Medieval English
Means "Ore hill", likely for iron ore miners. From the Old English ora, meaning "ore" and hyll, meaning hill.... [more]
PRINS Dutch, Jewish
Means "prince" in Dutch, but almost never a surname for a prince. Instead, it's an occupational surname for someone in the service of a prince or a nickname for someone who acted in a regal manner. The surname is also Jewish Dutch and is used as an ornamental adoption of Dutch prins still meaning "prince".
SAWTELL English (British)
A dialectal variant of SEWELL, which was first recorded in early 13th-century England. The later addition of the 't' was for easier pronunciation.... [more]
SCHELLEKENS Dutch
A Dutch patronymic surname of Germanic names like Schalk and Godschalk, meaning "God's Servant".
SCUDAMORE Anglo-Norman
A locational surname that was first recorded in England in 1264. Derived from one of the ancient villages of Fifield Scudamore or Upton Scudamore, with SCUDAMORE coming from the Old English scitemor, which means "one who lived at the moor."
SHEENE Irish (Anglicized)
Derived from the Gaelic siodhach which means "peaceful." Most commonly used in Ireland and originated in the county's southwest region.
SOUTHWICK English
An English/Scottish locational name from a variety of places, including, Southwick in Northamptonshire, England, and Southwick in Gloucestershire, Sussex, Durham, Hampshire. ... [more]
WEARE English (British)
Derived from the Old English wer, meaning a "weir, dam, fishing-trap". This was used as an occupational surname for fishermen. Originated in Devon, England.... [more]
WYKES Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English wic, roughly meaning "farm." The plural form is a patronymic of which is "son of Wic."... [more]
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