Surnames Categorized "isograms"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include isograms.
usage
Abreu Portuguese, Galician
Meaning uncertain, possibly from a given name that was of Germanic origin.
Adebayo Western African, Yoruba
From the given name Adebayo.
Adler German, Jewish
Means "eagle" in German.
Akers English
Variant of Acker.
Alesi Italian
From the given name Alessio.
Ali Arabic
From the given name Ali 1.
Alves Portuguese
Means "son of Álvaro".
Amos Jewish
From the given name Amos.
Anker Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Metonymic surname for a sailor, meaning "anchor" in Dutch, Danish and Norwegian.
Aoki Japanese
From Japanese (ao) meaning "green, blue" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
Auer German
From German Aue, Old High German ouwa, meaning "meadow by a river, wetland".
Ayton English
From the name of towns in Berwickshire and North Yorkshire. They are derived from Old English ea "river" or ieg "island" combined with tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Bailey English
From Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", which comes via Old French from Latin baiulus "porter".
Baker English
Occupational name meaning "baker", derived from Middle English bakere.
Banks English
Originally indicated someone who lived near a hillside or a bank of land.
Barlow English
Derived from a number of English place names that variously mean "barley hill", "barn hill", "boar clearing" or "barley clearing".
Barton English
From a place name meaning "barley town" in Old English.
Báthory Hungarian
Originally indicated a person from Bátor, a village in Hungary, which might be of Turkic origin meaning "hero". This was the surname of a Hungarian noble family who historically controlled the town. One of the family members, Stephen Báthory, became the king of Poland in the 16th century.
Bauer German
From Old High German bur meaning "peasant, farmer".
Baylor German (Anglicized)
Possibly an Americanized form of Beiler.
Bean English
English cognate of Bohn.
Beaumont French, English
From French place names derived from beau "beautiful" and mont "mountain".
Benoit French
From the given name Benoît.
Bishop English
Means simply "bishop", ultimately from Greek ἐπίσκοπος (episkopos) meaning "overseer". It probably originally referred to a person who served a bishop.
Black English
Means either "black" (from Old English blæc) or "pale" (from Old English blac). It could refer to a person with a pale or a dark complexion, or a person who worked with black dye.
Blaine Scottish
From the given name Bláán.
Blair Scottish
From any one of several places of this name in Scotland, which derive from Gaelic blàr meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
Blake English
Variant of Black. A famous bearer was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
Blanco Spanish
Means "white" in Spanish. The name most likely referred to a person who was pale or had blond hair.
Blum German, Jewish
Means "flower" in German and Yiddish.
Bohn German
Occupational name for a bean grower, derived from Middle High German bone "bean".
Bond English
Occupational name for a peasant farmer, from Middle English bonde. A famous bearer is the fictional spy James Bond, created by Ian Flemming in 1953.
Bonham English
English form of Bonhomme.
Bosch 1 Dutch, Low German
Derived from Middle Dutch bosch meaning "wood, forest".
Bourke English
Variant of Burke.
Bouvier French
Means "cowherd" in French, from Latin boviarus, a derivative of bos "cow".
Boyd Scottish
From the name of the Scottish island of Bute (Bód in Gaelic), which is of unknown meaning.
Bradley English
From a common English place name, derived from brad "broad" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Brady Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of Brádach". A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Tom Brady (1977-).
Brand 1 German, English
Derived from the Old German given name Brando or its Old Norse cognate Brandr.
Bravo Spanish, Portuguese
From a nickname meaning "angry, bold, brave" in Spanish and Portuguese.
Bridges English
Originally denoted a person who lived near a bridge, or who worked as a bridgekeeper, derived from Middle English brigge, Old English brycg.
Brody Scottish
Variant of Brodie.
Brown English
Originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin. A notable bearer is Charlie Brown from the Peanuts comic strip by Charles Schulz.
Browne English
Variant of Brown.
Bruce Scottish
Possibly from the name of the town of Brix in Normandy, which is of unknown meaning. It was brought to Scotland in the 12th century by the Anglo-Norman baron Robert de Brus. It was later borne by his descendant Robert the Bruce, a hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland.
Bryan English
From the given name Brian.
Bryant English
From the given name Brian.
Buckley 1 English
From an English place name derived from bucc "buck, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Burke English, Irish
Derived from Middle English burgh meaning "fortress, fortification, castle". It was brought to Ireland in the 12th century by the Norman invader William de Burgh.
Burnham English
From the name of various towns in England, typically derived from Old English burna "stream, spring" and ham "home, settlement".
Burns 2 Irish
Variant of O'Byrne.
Butcher English
Occupational name for a butcher, derived from Old French bouchier.
Butler English, Irish
Occupational name derived from Norman French butiller "wine steward", ultimately from Late Latin butticula "bottle". A famous bearer of this surname is the fictional character Rhett Butler, created by Margaret Mitchell for her novel Gone with the Wind (1936).
Byrne Irish
Variant of O'Byrne.
Cameron Scottish
Means "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
Carey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of Ciardha".
Carson Scottish
Meaning uncertain, possibly from the town of Courson in Normandy.
Casey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of Cathassach".
Cash English
Variant of Case.
Chambers English
From Old French chambre meaning "chamber, room", an occupational name for a person who worked in the inner rooms of a mansion.
Chang Chinese
Alternate transcription of Chinese (see Zhang).
Chase English
Occupational name for a hunter, from Middle English chase "hunt".
Chen Chinese
From Chinese (chén) meaning "exhibit, display, old, ancient" and also referring to the former state of Chen, which existed in what is now Henan province from the 11th to 5th centuries BC.
Cho Korean
Korean form of Zhao, from Sino-Korean (jo).
Choi Korean
From Sino-Korean (choe) meaning "high, lofty, towering".
Clark English
Means "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec meaning "priest", ultimately from Latin clericus. A famous bearer was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America.
Clarke English
Variant of Clark.
Clay English
Means simply "clay", originally referring to a person who lived near or worked with of clay.
Clayton English
From the name of various places meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
Cody Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cuidighthigh or Mac Óda. A famous bearer was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
Coghlan Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Cochláin.
Cole English
From a medieval short form of Nicholas or from the byname Cola.
Coleman Irish, English
From the given name Colmán.
Combs English
Variant of Coombs.
Costa Portuguese, Italian, Catalan
Means "riverbank, slope, coast" in Portuguese, Italian and Catalan, ultimately from Latin meaning "side, edge".
Cox English
Patronymic form of Cock.
Craig Scottish
Derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag, rocks, outcrop", originally belonging to a person who lived near a crag.
Croft English
From Old English croft meaning "enclosed field".
Cruz Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese cognate of Cross.
Curtis English
Nickname for a courteous person, derived from Old French curteis meaning "refined, courtly".
Daley Irish
Variant of Daly.
Dalí Spanish
From a given name, itself a diminutive of names beginning with the Old German element adal meaning "noble". This was the surname of the Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dalí (1904-1989).
Davis English, Scottish
Means "son of David". This was the surname of the revolutionary jazz trumpet player Miles Davis (1926-1991).
Dawson English
Means "son of Daw".
Day English
From a diminutive form of David.
Deacon English
Means "deacon", ultimately from Greek διάκονος (diakonos) meaning "servant".
Dean 1 English
Derived from Middle English dene meaning "valley".
De Jong Dutch
Means "young" in Dutch, from Middle Dutch jonc. This is the most common surname in the Netherlands.
De la Cruz Spanish
Spanish cognate of Delacroix.
Díaz Spanish
Means "son of Diego" in Spanish.
Dior French
Possibly from French doré meaning "golden". A famous bearer was the French fashion designer Christian Dior (1905-1957).
Disney English
Means "from Isigny", referring to the town of Isigny in Normandy. This surname was borne by the American animator and filmmaker Walt Disney (1901-1966).
Đỗ Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Du, from Sino-Vietnamese (đỗ).
Doherty Irish
From the Irish Ó Dochartaigh meaning "descendant of Dochartach". The byname Dochartach means "obstructive".
Dorsey English
Means "from Orsay", referring to the town of Orsay near Paris, its name deriving from the Latin personal name Orcius.
Douglas Scottish
From the name of a town in Lanarkshire, itself named after a tributary of the River Clyde called the Douglas Water, derived from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). This was a Scottish Lowland clan, the leaders of which were powerful earls in the medieval period.
Duke English
From the noble title, which was originally from Latin dux "leader". It was a nickname for a person who behaved like a duke, or who worked in a duke's household.
Dunbar Scottish
From the name of a town in East Lothian, Scotland, derived from Gaelic dùn meaning "fort" and barr meaning "summit", so called from its situation on a rock that projects into the sea.
Dunst German
Derived from Middle High German dunst "haze".
Dupont French
Means "from the bridge", from French pont "bridge".
Durán Spanish
Spanish cognate of Durand.
Dwight English
From the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of Dionysius.
Dyson English
Means "son of Dye".
Earl English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl meaning "nobleman, warrior". It was either a nickname for one who acted like an earl, or an occupational name for a person employed by an earl.
Eason English
Variant of Eads.
Easton English
From the name of various places meaning "east town" in Old English.
Eaton English
From any of the various English towns with this name, derived from Old English ea "river" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Edison English
Means "son of Eda 2" or "son of Adam". The surname was borne by American inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
Espino Spanish
Variant of Espina.
Evans Welsh
Means "son of Evan".
Fairclough English
From a place name meaning "fair ravine, fair cliff" in Old English.
Ferguson Irish, Scottish
Means "son of Fergus".
Fields English
Name for a person who lived on or near a field or pasture, from Old English feld.
Finlay Scottish
Anglicized form of MacFhionnlaigh.
Finley Scottish
Anglicized (typically American) form of MacFhionnlaigh.
Fischer German
Occupational name meaning "fisherman" in German.
Fitzgerald Irish
Means "son of Gerald" in Anglo-Norman French. It was brought to Ireland with William the Conqueror. A famous bearer was Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996), an American jazz singer.
Foley Irish
From Irish Ó Foghladha meaning "descendant of Foghlaidh". The byname Foghlaidh meant "pirate, marauder, plunderer".
Ford English
Name given to someone who lived by a ford, possibly the official who maintained it. A famous bearer was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
Fowler English
Occupational name for a fowler or birdcatcher, ultimately derived from Old English fugol meaning "bird".
Fox English
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
Francis English
Derived from the given name Francis.
Frost English, German
From Old English and Old High German meaning "frost", a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
Fry English
From Old English frig (a variant of freo) meaning "free".
Frye English
Variant of Fry.
Géroux French
Derived from the Germanic name Gerulf.
Gibson English, Scottish
Means "son of Gib".
Gilbert English, French
Derived from the given name Gilbert.
Gold English, German, Jewish
From Old English and Old High German gold meaning "gold", an occupational name for someone who worked with gold or a nickname for someone with yellow hair. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
Gómez Spanish
Spanish form of Gomes.
Gorman 1 German
From the Old German given name Germund.
Gorman 2 Irish
From the Irish Ó Gormáin meaning "descendant of Gormán". The given name Gormán means "little blue one".
Grant English, Scottish
Derived from Norman French meaning "grand, tall, large, great".
Graves English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
Gray English
From a nickname for a person who had grey hair or grey clothes.
Haines English
Variant of Haynes.
Hakim Arabic
Derived from the given name Hakim.
Hale English
Derived from Old English halh meaning "nook, recess, hollow".
Haley English
From the name of an English town meaning "hay clearing", from Old English heg "hay" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Hamilton English, Scottish
From an English place name, derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". This was the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists).
Harden English
From a place name meaning "hare valley" in Old English.
Hardy English, French
From Old French and Middle English hardi meaning "bold, daring, hardy", from the Germanic root *harduz.
Harley English
Derived from a place name meaning "hare clearing", from Old English hara "hare" or hær "rock, heap of stones" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Hart English
Means "male deer". It was originally acquired by a person who lived in a place frequented by harts, or bore some resemblance to a hart.
Harvey English
From the Breton given name Haerviu (see Harvey).
Hawkins English
From a diminutive of Hawk.
Hayes 1 English
From various English place names that were derived from Old English hæg meaning "enclosure, fence". A famous bearer was American President Rutherford B. Hayes (1822-1893).
Haynes English
Patronymic derived from the Norman name Hagano.
He Chinese
From Chinese (), representing a southern pronunciation of the name of the ancient state of Han (see Han). After Han was destroyed by the state of Qin, those who resettled further south changed their name to this character in order to match the local pronunciation.
Heinz German
Derived from a diminutive of Heinrich.
Hendrix Dutch
Derived from the given name Hendrik. A famous bearer was the American rock musician Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970).
Henry English
Derived from the given name Henry.
Herzog German
From a German title meaning "duke", a nickname for a person who either acted like a duke or worked in a duke's household.
Hicks English
Derived from the medieval given name Hicke, a diminutive of Richard.
Hilton English
From various English place names derived from Old English hyll "hill" and tun "enclosure, town". Famous bearers of this name include the Hilton family of hotel heirs.
Hines Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó hEidhin meaning "descendant of Eidhin", a given name or byname of unknown origin.
Ho Chinese (Cantonese), Chinese (Hokkien)
Cantonese and Min Nan romanization of He.
Holm Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Swedish, Danish and Norwegian holme, holm meaning "islet" (Old Norse holmr).
Holmgren Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish holme (Old Norse holmr) meaning "small island" and gren (Old Norse grein) meaning "branch".
Holt English, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
From Old English, Old Dutch and Old Norse holt meaning "forest".
Hopkins English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Hob.
Horn English, German, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old English, Old High German and Old Norse word horn meaning "horn". This was an occupational name for one who carved objects out of horn or who played a horn, or a person who lived near a horn-shaped geographical feature, such as a mountain or a bend in a river.
Howard 1 English
Derived from the given name Hughard or Hávarðr.
Howse English
Variant of Howe.
Huber German
Occupational name for a farmer, derived from Old High German huoba "plot of land, farm".
Hudson English
Means "son of Hudde".
Hunt English
Variant of Hunter.
Hunter English, Scottish
Occupational name that referred to someone who hunted for a living, from Old English hunta.
I Korean
Variant of Lee 2.
Ibáñez Spanish
Means "son of Ibán".
Ito Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 伊藤 (see Itō).
Jackson English
Means "son of Jack". Famous bearers of this name are the American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) and the singer Michael Jackson (1958-2009).
Jacobs English, Dutch
Derived from the given name Jacob.
Jacobsen Danish
Means "son of Jacob".
James English
Derived from the given name James.
Jarvis English
Derived from the given name Gervais.
Jeong Korean
Korean form of Zheng, from Sino-Korean (jeong).
John English
Derived from the given name John. A famous bearer is British musician Elton John (1947-), born Reginald Dwight.
Jones English, Welsh
Derived from the given name Jon, a medieval variant of John.
Jordan 1 English, French, German
Derived from the given name Jordan.
Joseph English, French
Derived from the given name Joseph.
Kaiser German
From Middle High German keiser meaning "emperor", originally a nickname applied to someone who acted kingly. The title ultimately derives from the Roman name Caesar.
Kane Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Catháin.
Katz Jewish
Derived from Hebrew כֹּהֵן צֶדֶק (kohen tzedek) meaning "priest of justice", indicating a descendant of Aaron.
Kay 1 English
Derived from the given name Kay 2.
Keys 1 English
Variant of Kay 1 or Kay 2.
Khan Urdu, Pashto, Bengali
From a title meaning "king, ruler", probably of Mongolian origin but used in many languages.
Kim Korean
Korean form of Jin, from Sino-Korean (gim) meaning "gold". This is the most common surname in Korea.
King English
From Old English cyning "king", originally a nickname for someone who either acted in a kingly manner or who worked for or was otherwise associated with a king. A famous bearer was the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968).
Kirch German
German cognate of Church.
Klein German, Dutch, Jewish
Means "small, little" from German klein or Yiddish kleyn. A famous bearer of this name is clothes designer Calvin Klein (1942-).
Knight English
From Old English cniht meaning "knight", a tenant serving as a mounted soldier.
Koch German
German cognate of Cook.
Koenig German
German cognate of King.
Kohl German
Derived from Middle High German kol "cabbage".
Kos Slovene
Means "blackbird" in Slovene.
Krejči Czech
Means "tailor" in Czech.
Krupa Polish
Means "groats, grain" in Polish.
Kruse German
Variant of Kraus.
Kuhn German
Derived from a diminutive of the German given name Konrad.
Kwan Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Guan.
Lambert French
Derived from the given name Lambert.
Lamont Scottish
From the medieval Gaelic given name Lagmann, derived from Old Norse lǫgmaðr meaning "law man".
Lane 1 English
Originally designated one who lived by a lane, a narrow way between fences or hedges, later used of any narrow pathway, including one between houses in a town.
Lange German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian cognate of Long.
Laurent French
From the given name Laurent.
Lawson English
Means "son of Laurence 1".
Leitz German
Derived from the archaic given name Leutz, a variant of Lutz.
Leonard English
Derived from the given name Leonard.
Lewis 1 English
Derived from the given name Lewis. The author C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) was a bearer of this surname.
Lin Chinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest".
Long English
Originally a nickname for a person who had long limbs or who was tall.
Lopes Portuguese
Means "son of Lopo" in Portuguese.
López Spanish
Means "son of Lope" in Spanish.
Lowe 1 Jewish (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Löwe.
Lowry English, Scottish
From a diminutive of the given name Laurence 1.
Lucas English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch
Derived from the given name Lucas. A famous bearer of this surname is George Lucas (1944-), the creator of the Star Wars movies.
Lynch Irish
From Irish Ó Loingsigh meaning "descendant of Loingseach", a given name meaning "mariner".
Lyne Scottish
Habitational name for someone who lived in places of this name in Scotland.
Lyon 1 English, French
Originally denoted a person from the city of Lyon in central France, originally Latin Lugdunum, of Gaulish origin meaning "hill fort of Lugus". It could also denote a person from the small town of Lyons-la-Forêt in Normandy.
Macy English
Variant of Massey.
Maguire Irish
Variant of McGuire.
Maki 2 Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" and (ki) meaning "tree".
Malone Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Maoil Eoin meaning "descendant of a disciple of Saint John".
Marconi Italian
Derived from the given name Marco.
Marion French
Derived from the given name Marion 1.
Marley English
Originally denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in Britain called Marley, ultimately meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. One of the main characters in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol (1843) bears this surname.
Márquez Spanish
Means "son of Marcos".
Martin English, French, German, Swedish
Derived from the given name Martin. This is the most common surname in France.
Martínez Spanish
Means "son of Martín" in Spanish.
Mason English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, of Frankish origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
Mathers English
Occupational name meaning "mower, cutter of hay" in Old English.
Mathews English
Derived from the given name Matthew.
McBride Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Giolla Bhrighde.
McGuire Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Mag Uidhir meaning "son of Odhar", a given name meaning "pale-coloured".
McIntyre Scottish
From Scottish Gaelic Mac an tSaoir meaning "son of the carpenter".
McNeil Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic MacNèill meaning "son of Niall".
Meir Jewish
Variant of Meyer 2.
Michael English, German
From the given name Michael.
Michaels English
Derived from the given name Michael.
Molina Spanish
Means "mill" in Spanish.
Monk English
Nickname or occupational name for a person who worked for monks. This word is derived from Latin monachus, from Greek μοναχός (monachos) meaning "alone".
Morgan Welsh
Derived from the given name Morgan 1.
Moser German
Name for someone who lived near a peat bog, from Middle High German mos.
Muir Scottish
Scots form of Moore 1. This name was borne by the Scottish-American naturalist John Muir (1838-1914).
Murphy Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of Murchadh". This is the most common Irish surname.
Musiał Polish
Polish cognate of Musil.
Myers English
Patronymic form of Mayer 3.
Nash English
Derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015).
Ng 1 Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Wu 1.
Nichols English
Derived from the given name Nichol.
Noel French, English
Either from the given name Noël, or else derived directly from Old French noel "Christmas" and given to a person who had a particular connection with the holiday.
Nogueira Portuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician nogueira meaning "walnut tree", from the Late Latin nucarius, ultimately from Latin nux meaning "nut".
Normand French
French form of Norman.
North English
Name for a person who lived to the north.
O Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul (see Oh).
Oakley English
From a place name meaning "oak clearing" in Old English. It was borne by American sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926).
O'Brien Irish
From the Irish Ó Briain meaning "descendant of Brian".
Oh Korean
Korean form of Wu 1, from Sino-Korean (o).
O'Leary Irish
From Irish Ó Laoghaire meaning "descendant of Laoghaire".
Oliver English, Catalan, German, French
Derived from the given name Oliver.
Olsen Norwegian, Danish
Means "son of Ole".
O'Neal Irish
From Irish Ó Néill meaning "descendant of Neil".
Ortega Spanish
From a Spanish place name (belonging to various villages) derived from ortiga "nettle".
Ortiz Spanish
Means "son of Orti", a byname deriving either from Latin fortis meaning "brave, strong" or fortunius meaning "fortunate".
Otis English
Means "son of Ode".
Owens Welsh
From the Welsh given name Owain.
Pace Italian
Derived from the Italian given name Pace meaning "peace".
Page English, French
Occupational name meaning "servant, page". It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδίον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
Palmer English
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
Parish 1 English
Originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris, which got its name from the ancient Celtic tribe known as the Parisii.
Patrick English
From the given name Patrick.
Paul English, French, German, Dutch
From the given name Paul.
Paulson English
Means "son of Paul".
Payne English
From a medieval given name or nickname derived from Latin paganus meaning "heathen, pagan" (from an earlier sense "rural, rustic"), which was given to children whose baptism had been postponed or adults who were not overly religious.
Payton English
From the name of the town of Peyton in Sussex. It means "Pæga's town".
Peck 1 English
Variant of Peak.
Pei Chinese
From Chinese (péi), possibly referring to an ancient city.
Peña Spanish
Originally denoted a person who lived near a jutting rock, from Spanish peña meaning "rock, cliff".
Perkins English
Means "son of Perkin", a medieval diminutive of Peter.