Surnames Categorized "isograms"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include isograms.
usage
Abreu Portuguese, Galician
Meaning uncertain, possibly from a given name that was of Germanic origin.
Abt German
German cognate of Abate.
Adebayo Western African, Yoruba
From the given name Adebayo.
Adkins English
Variant of Atkins.
Adler German, Jewish
Means "eagle" in German.
Aerts Dutch, Flemish
From a diminutive of the given name Arnout.
Ahmed Arabic, Urdu, Bengali, Indian (Muslim)
Derived from the given name Ahmad.
Ainsley Scottish
From a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Aitken Scottish, English
Derived from the medieval given name Atkin, a diminutive of Adam.
Akers English
Variant of Acker.
Albert English, French, Catalan, Hungarian, Romanian, German
Derived from the given name Albert.
Alden English
Derived from the Old English given name Ealdwine.
Alesi Italian
From the given name Alessio.
Ali Arabic
From the given name Ali 1.
Aliyev Azerbaijani
Alternate transcription of Azerbaijani Əliyev.
Alves Portuguese
Means "son of Álvaro".
Amos Jewish
From the given name Amos.
Andreu Catalan
From the given name Andreu.
Anker Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Metonymic surname for a sailor, meaning "anchor" in Dutch, Danish and Norwegian.
Aoki Japanese
From Japanese (ao) meaning "green, blue" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
Arce Spanish
Means "maple tree" in Spanish.
Arends Dutch
Means "son of Arend".
Arnold English
Derived from the given name Arnold.
Aston 1 English
From a place name meaning "east town" in Old English.
Atkins English
Means "son of Atkin", a medieval diminutive of Adam.
Auer German
From German Aue, Old High German ouwa, meaning "meadow by a river, wetland".
Austin English
Derived from the given name Austin.
Avery English
Derived from a Norman French form of the given names Alberich or Alfred.
Ayton English
From the name of towns in Berwickshire and North Yorkshire. They are derived from Old English ea "river" or ieg "island" combined with tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Bach German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a stream, from Middle High German bach meaning "stream". This name was borne by members of the Bach musical family, notably the composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750).
Bagley English
From various English place names, derived from the Old English given name Bacga combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
Bailey English
From Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", which comes via Old French from Latin baiulus "porter".
Baird Scottish
Anglicized form of Mac an Baird.
Baker English
Occupational name meaning "baker", derived from Middle English bakere.
Baldwin English
Derived from the given name Baldwin.
Banks English
Originally indicated someone who lived near a hillside or a bank of land.
Barlow English
Derived from a number of English place names that variously mean "barley hill", "barn hill", "boar clearing" or "barley clearing".
Barton English
From a place name meaning "barley town" in Old English.
Bartosz Polish
Derived from the given name Bartosz.
Bates English
Means "son of Bate".
Bateson English
Means "son of Bate".
Báthory Hungarian
Originally indicated a person from Bátor, a village in Hungary, which might be of Turkic origin meaning "hero". This was the surname of a Hungarian noble family who historically controlled the town. One of the family members, Stephen Báthory, became the king of Poland in the 16th century.
Bauer German
From Old High German bur meaning "peasant, farmer".
Baxter English
Variant (in origin a feminine form) of Baker.
Baylor German (Anglicized)
Possibly an Americanized form of Beiler.
Bean English
English cognate of Bohn.
Beaufort French
From various French place names derived from beau "beautiful" and fort "strong place, fortress".
Beaumont French, English
From French place names derived from beau "beautiful" and mont "mountain".
Beck 1 English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Cognate of Bach, from Middle English bekke (from Old Norse), Low German beke or Old Norse bekkr all meaning "stream".
Begum Indian (Muslim), Bengali (Muslim), Urdu, Punjabi
From a title traditionally used as an honorific for Muslim women in India and other parts of southern Asia. It is derived from a feminine form of the Turkic title beg meaning "chieftain" (modern Turkish bey).
Benoit French
From the given name Benoît.
Bishop English
Means simply "bishop", ultimately from Greek ἐπίσκοπος (episkopos) meaning "overseer". It probably originally referred to a person who served a bishop.
Black English
Means either "black" (from Old English blæc) or "pale" (from Old English blac). It could refer to a person with a pale or a dark complexion, or a person who worked with black dye.
Blaine Scottish
From the given name Bláán.
Blair Scottish
From any one of several places of this name in Scotland, which derive from Gaelic blàr meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
Blake English
Variant of Black. A famous bearer was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
Blanc French
Means "white" in French. The name referred to a person who was pale, or whose hair was blond.
Blanco Spanish
Means "white" in Spanish. The name most likely referred to a person who was pale or had blond hair.
Blomqvist Swedish
From Swedish blomma (Old Norse blóm) meaning "flower" and qvist (Old Norse kvistr) meaning "twig, branch".
Blue English
From a nickname for a person with blue eyes or blue clothing.
Blum German, Jewish
Means "flower" in German and Yiddish.
Bodnár Hungarian
Means "cooper, barrel maker" in Hungarian.
Bohn German
Occupational name for a bean grower, derived from Middle High German bone "bean".
Bolívar Spanish
From Bolibar, the name of a small Basque village, derived from Basque bolu "mill" and ibar "meadow". This name was borne by the revolutionary Simón Bolívar (1783-1830).
Bond English
Occupational name for a peasant farmer, from Middle English bonde. A famous bearer is the fictional spy James Bond, created by Ian Flemming in 1953.
Bone 1 English
Derived from Old French bon meaning "good".
Bonham English
English form of Bonhomme.
Bosch 1 Dutch, Low German
Derived from Middle Dutch bosch meaning "wood, forest".
Botha Southern African, Afrikaans
South African variant of Both.
Boucher French
Means "butcher" in French.
Bourke English
Variant of Burke.
Bourne English
Derived from Old English burna "stream, spring".
Bouvier French
Means "cowherd" in French, from Latin boviarus, a derivative of bos "cow".
Bowie Scottish
Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Buidheach, derived from buidhe meaning "yellow". A famous bearer was the American pioneer James Bowie (1796-1836), for whom the bowie knife is named. The British musician David Bowie (1947-2016), born David Robert Jones, took his stage name from the American pioneer (and the knife).
Bowman English
Occupational name for an archer, derived from Middle English bowe, Old English boga meaning "bow".
Boyce English
From Old French bois meaning "wood", originally given to someone who lived by or in a wood.
Boyd Scottish
From the name of the Scottish island of Bute (Bód in Gaelic), which is of unknown meaning.
Bradley English
From a common English place name, derived from brad "broad" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Brady Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of Brádach". A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Tom Brady (1977-).
Brahms German
Derived from the given name Abraham. A famous bearer of this surname was the German composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
Brand 1 German, English
Derived from the Old German given name Brando or its Old Norse cognate Brandr.
Braun German
Means "brown" in German.
Bravo Spanish, Portuguese
From a nickname meaning "angry, bold, brave" in Spanish and Portuguese.
Braxton English
From an English place name place name meaning "Bracca's town" in Old English.
Brice English
From the given name Brice.
Bridges English
Originally denoted a person who lived near a bridge, or who worked as a bridgekeeper, derived from Middle English brigge, Old English brycg.
Bristow English
From the name of the city of Bristol, originally Brycgstow in Old English, meaning "the site of the bridge".
Brkić Croatian, Serbian
Derived from Serbo-Croatian brk meaning "moustache, whisker".
Brody Scottish
Variant of Brodie.
Brown English
Originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin. A notable bearer is Charlie Brown from the Peanuts comic strip by Charles Schulz.
Browne English
Variant of Brown.
Bruce Scottish
Possibly from the name of the town of Brix in Normandy, which is of unknown meaning. It was brought to Scotland in the 12th century by the Anglo-Norman baron Robert de Brus. It was later borne by his descendant Robert the Bruce, a hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland.
Bruhn German
Variant of Braun.
Bryan English
From the given name Brian.
Bryant English
From the given name Brian.
Buckley 1 English
From an English place name derived from bucc "buck, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Bueno Spanish
From a nickname meaning "good" in Spanish.
Burke English, Irish
Derived from Middle English burgh meaning "fortress, fortification, castle". It was brought to Ireland in the 12th century by the Norman invader William de Burgh.
Burnham English
From the name of various towns in England, typically derived from Old English burna "stream, spring" and ham "home, settlement".
Burns 1 English, Scottish
Derived from Old English burna "stream, spring". A famous bearer was the Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796).
Burns 2 Irish
Variant of O'Byrne.
Burton English
From a common English place name, derived from Old English meaning "fortified town".
Busch German
Means "bush" in German, a name for someone who lived close to a thicket.
Butcher English
Occupational name for a butcher, derived from Old French bouchier.
Butler English, Irish
Occupational name derived from Norman French butiller "wine steward", ultimately from Late Latin butticula "bottle". A famous bearer of this surname is the fictional character Rhett Butler, created by Margaret Mitchell for her novel Gone with the Wind (1936).
Byrd English
Variant of Bird.
Byrne Irish
Variant of O'Byrne.
Cameron Scottish
Means "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
Campo Spanish, Italian
Means "field" in Spanish and Italian.
Cao Chinese
From Chinese (cáo) referring to the ancient state of Cao, which existed during the Zhou dynasty in what is now Shandong province.
Carey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of Ciardha".
Carlsen Danish, Norwegian
Means "son of Carl".
Carlson Swedish
Means "son of Carl".
Carson Scottish
Meaning uncertain, possibly from the town of Courson in Normandy.
Cary Irish
Variant of Carey.
Case English
From Norman French casse meaning "box, case", ultimately from Latin capsa. This was an occupational name for a box maker.
Casey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of Cathassach".
Cash English
Variant of Case.
Castle English
From Middle English castel meaning "castle", from Late Latin castellum, originally indicating a person who lived near a castle.
Castro Spanish, Portuguese
Means "castle" in Spanish and Portuguese, referring to one who lived near a castle. A famous bearer was Fidel Castro (1926-2016), revolutionary and president of Cuba.
Chambers English
From Old French chambre meaning "chamber, room", an occupational name for a person who worked in the inner rooms of a mansion.
Chan Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Chen.
Chang Chinese
Alternate transcription of Chinese (see Zhang).
Chase English
Occupational name for a hunter, from Middle English chase "hunt".
Chen Chinese
From Chinese (chén) meaning "exhibit, display, old, ancient" and also referring to the former state of Chen, which existed in what is now Henan province from the 11th to 5th centuries BC.
Cheng 1 Chinese
From Chinese (chéng) meaning "rule, order, regulations", also referring to the territory of Cheng (in present-day Henan province) that existed during the Zhou dynasty.
Cho Korean
Korean form of Zhao, from Sino-Korean (jo).
Choi Korean
From Sino-Korean (choe) meaning "high, lofty, towering".
Chou Chinese
Alternate transcription of Chinese (see Zhou).
Chu Chinese
Alternate transcription of Chinese (see Zhu).
Clark English
Means "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec meaning "priest", ultimately from Latin clericus. A famous bearer was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America.
Clarke English
Variant of Clark.
Clay English
Means simply "clay", originally referring to a person who lived near or worked with of clay.
Clayton English
From the name of various places meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
Clifton English
Derived from various place names meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
Cline German, Jewish
Anglicized spelling of Klein.
Cody Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cuidighthigh or Mac Óda. A famous bearer was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
Coghlan Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Cochláin.
Cohen Jewish
Means "priest" from Hebrew כֹּהֵן (kohen). It originally denoted one of the priestly tribe of Levi.
Colbert English, French
Derived from the given name Colobert.
Colby English
From various English place names, which were derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
Cole English
From a medieval short form of Nicholas or from the byname Cola.
Coleman Irish, English
From the given name Colmán.
Colter English
Variant of Colt using an agent suffix.
Combs English
Variant of Coombs.
Conti Italian
From the Italian noble title conte meaning "count", derived from Latin comes. It denoted a person who worked for a count or, in rare cases, was a count.
Corvi Italian
Nickname derived from Italian corvo meaning "crow".
Costa Portuguese, Italian, Catalan
Means "riverbank, slope, coast" in Portuguese, Italian and Catalan, ultimately from Latin meaning "side, edge".
Coughlin Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Cochláin.
Cox English
Patronymic form of Cock.
Craig Scottish
Derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag, rocks, outcrop", originally belonging to a person who lived near a crag.
Croft English
From Old English croft meaning "enclosed field".
Cruz Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese cognate of Cross.
Cuesta Spanish
Spanish form of Costa.
Cuevas Spanish
Derived from Spanish cueva meaning "cave".
Curtis English
Nickname for a courteous person, derived from Old French curteis meaning "refined, courtly".
Daley Irish
Variant of Daly.
Dalí Spanish
From a given name, itself a diminutive of names beginning with the Old German element adal meaning "noble". This was the surname of the Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dalí (1904-1989).
Daniel English, French, German, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Romanian
Derived from the given name Daniel.
Darwin English
From the given name Deorwine.
Davis English, Scottish
Means "son of David". This was the surname of the revolutionary jazz trumpet player Miles Davis (1926-1991).
Dawson English
Means "son of Daw".
Day English
From a diminutive form of David.
Deacon English
Means "deacon", ultimately from Greek διάκονος (diakonos) meaning "servant".
Dean 1 English
Derived from Middle English dene meaning "valley".
DeGarmo French (Anglicized)
Americanized form of French de Garmeaux, which may derive from a place called Garmeaux in Normandy.
De Jong Dutch
Means "young" in Dutch, from Middle Dutch jonc. This is the most common surname in the Netherlands.
Delacroix French
Means "of the cross" in French. It denoted one who lived near a cross symbol or near a crossroads.
De la Cruz Spanish
Spanish cognate of Delacroix.
Díaz Spanish
Means "son of Diego" in Spanish.
Dickens English
From the medieval given name Dicun, a medieval diminutive of Dick 1. A famous bearer of this surname was the English writer Charles Dickens (1812-1870).
Ding Chinese
From Chinese (dīng) meaning "man, person".
Dior French
Possibly from French doré meaning "golden". A famous bearer was the French fashion designer Christian Dior (1905-1957).
Dirksen Dutch, German
Means "son of Dirk".
Disney English
Means "from Isigny", referring to the town of Isigny in Normandy. This surname was borne by the American animator and filmmaker Walt Disney (1901-1966).
Dixon English
Means "son of Dick 1".
Đỗ Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Du, from Sino-Vietnamese (đỗ).
Doherty Irish
From the Irish Ó Dochartaigh meaning "descendant of Dochartach". The byname Dochartach means "obstructive".
Dolan Irish
From the Irish Ó Dubhshláin meaning "descendant of Dubhshláine".
Donati Italian
From the given name Donato.
Doran Irish
From Irish Ó Deoradháin meaning "descendant of Deoradhán", where Deoradhán is a given name meaning "exile, wanderer".
Dorsey English
Means "from Orsay", referring to the town of Orsay near Paris, its name deriving from the Latin personal name Orcius.
Douglas Scottish
From the name of a town in Lanarkshire, itself named after a tributary of the River Clyde called the Douglas Water, derived from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). This was a Scottish Lowland clan, the leaders of which were powerful earls in the medieval period.
Doyle Irish
From the Irish Ó Dubhghaill, which means "descendant of Dubhghall". A famous bearer was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
Drago Italian
From a nickname meaning "dragon" in Italian.
Drake English
Derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δράκων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent".
Duane Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Dubháin meaning "descendant of Dubhán".
Duarte Portuguese, Spanish
From the given name Duarte.
Duke English
From the noble title, which was originally from Latin dux "leader". It was a nickname for a person who behaved like a duke, or who worked in a duke's household.
Dunbar Scottish
From the name of a town in East Lothian, Scotland, derived from Gaelic dùn meaning "fort" and barr meaning "summit", so called from its situation on a rock that projects into the sea.
Dunst German
Derived from Middle High German dunst "haze".
Dupont French
Means "from the bridge", from French pont "bridge".
Durán Spanish
Spanish cognate of Durand.
Durant English, French
Variation of Durand.
Đurić Serbian, Croatian
Means "son of Đuro".
Dwight English
From the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of Dionysius.
Dyer English
Occupational name meaning "cloth dyer", from Old English deah "dye".
Dyson English
Means "son of Dye".
Eady English
From a diminutive of the given name Eda 2 or Adam.
Earl English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl meaning "nobleman, warrior". It was either a nickname for one who acted like an earl, or an occupational name for a person employed by an earl.
Eason English
Variant of Eads.
Easton English
From the name of various places meaning "east town" in Old English.
Eaton English
From any of the various English towns with this name, derived from Old English ea "river" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Edgar English
Derived from the given name Edgar.
Edison English
Means "son of Eda 2" or "son of Adam". The surname was borne by American inventor Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931).
Eklund Swedish
From Swedish ek (Old Norse eik) meaning "oak" and lund (Old Norse lundr) meaning "grove".
Elwin English
Variant of Elwyn.
Elzinga Dutch
Probably from a place name that was a derivative of Dutch els meaning "alder tree".
English English
Denoted a person who was of English heritage. It was used to distinguish people who lived in border areas (for example, near Wales or Scotland). It was also used to distinguish an Anglo-Saxon from a Norman.
Engström Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish äng (Old Norse eng) meaning "meadow" and ström (Old Norse straumr) meaning "stream".
Erickson English
Means "son of Eric".
Ernst German, Dutch, Danish
From the given name Ernst.
Espino Spanish
Variant of Espina.
Evans Welsh
Means "son of Evan".
Fairclough English
From a place name meaning "fair ravine, fair cliff" in Old English.
Faulkner English, Scottish
Occupational name meaning "keeper of falcons", from Middle English and Scots faulcon, from Late Latin falco, of Germanic origin.
Fay French, English
Referred to a person who came from various places named Fay or Faye in northern France, derived from Old French fau "beech tree", from Latin fagus.
Ferguson Irish, Scottish
Means "son of Fergus".
Fermi Italian
Originally indicated a person from the town of Fermo in the Marche region of Italy, originally called Firmum in Latin meaning "strong, steady, firm".
Field English
Variant of Fields.
Fields English
Name for a person who lived on or near a field or pasture, from Old English feld.
Finch English, Literature
From the name of the bird, from Old English finc. It was used by Harper Lee for the surname of lawyer Atticus Finch and his children in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird (1960).
Findlay Scottish
Anglicized form of MacFhionnlaigh.
Finlay Scottish
Anglicized form of MacFhionnlaigh.
Finley Scottish
Anglicized (typically American) form of MacFhionnlaigh.
Fischer German
Occupational name meaning "fisherman" in German.
Fitzgerald Irish
Means "son of Gerald" in Anglo-Norman French. It was brought to Ireland with William the Conqueror. A famous bearer was Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996), an American jazz singer.
Fleming English
Given to a person who was a Fleming, that is a person who was from Flanders in the Netherlands.
Flores Spanish
Means "son of Floro" in Spanish.
Flower English
From Middle English flour meaning "flower, blossom", derived from Old French flur, Latin flos. This was a nickname given to a sweet person. In other cases it could be a metonymic occupational name for a maker of flour (a word derived from the same source).
Floyd Welsh
Variant of Lloyd.
Foley Irish
From Irish Ó Foghladha meaning "descendant of Foghlaidh". The byname Foghlaidh meant "pirate, marauder, plunderer".
Ford English
Name given to someone who lived by a ford, possibly the official who maintained it. A famous bearer was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
Fortuin Dutch
Dutch cognate of Fortune.
Fowler English
Occupational name for a fowler or birdcatcher, ultimately derived from Old English fugol meaning "bird".
Fox English
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
Francis English
Derived from the given name Francis.
Frank 3 German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Name for a person from Franconia in Germany, so called because it was settled by the Frankish people.
Friel Irish
From the Irish Ó Frighil meaning "descendant of Fearghal".
Frost English, German
From Old English and Old High German meaning "frost", a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
Fry English
From Old English frig (a variant of freo) meaning "free".
Frye English
Variant of Fry.
Fülöp Hungarian
Derived from the given name Fülöp.
Furlan Italian, Slovene
From the name of the Italian region of Friuli, in the northeast of Italy, which is derived from the name of the Roman town of Forum Iulii meaning "forum of Julius".
Gao Chinese
From Chinese (gāo) meaning "tall, high".
Gatsby English (Rare), Literature
Rare variant of Gadsby. This name was used by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald for the central character in his novel The Great Gatsby (1925). In the book, James Gatz renames himself as Jay Gatsby at age 17 because he believes it sounds more sophisticated.
Géroux French
Derived from the Germanic name Gerulf.
Gibson English, Scottish
Means "son of Gib".
Gilbert English, French
Derived from the given name Gilbert.
Giraud French
From the given name Gérald.
Godfrey English
From the Norman given name Godfrey.
Gold English, German, Jewish
From Old English and Old High German gold meaning "gold", an occupational name for someone who worked with gold or a nickname for someone with yellow hair. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
Gomes Portuguese
From the medieval given name Gomes.
Gómez Spanish
Spanish form of Gomes.
Gorman 1 German
From the Old German given name Germund.
Gorman 2 Irish
From the Irish Ó Gormáin meaning "descendant of Gormán". The given name Gormán means "little blue one".
Górski Polish
From the Polish word góra meaning "mountain".
Graf German
From the German noble title Graf meaning "count", ultimately from Greek γραφεύς (grapheus) meaning "scribe".
Grant English, Scottish
Derived from Norman French meaning "grand, tall, large, great".
Graves English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
Gray English
From a nickname for a person who had grey hair or grey clothes.
Grey English
Variant of Gray.
Groß German
From Old High German groz meaning "tall, big".
Groves English
From Old English graf meaning "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
Guo Chinese
From Chinese (guō) meaning "outer city".
Gupta Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Punjabi, Telugu
Means "protected" in Sanskrit.
Guzmán Spanish
From the name of the town of Guzmán in Burgos, Spain. The town's name itself may be derived from an old Visigothic given name, from the Germanic elements *gautaz "a Geat" and *mannô "person, man".
Hagen Norwegian, Dutch
From Old Norse hagi or Old Dutch hago meaning "enclosure, pasture".
Haines English
Variant of Haynes.
Hájek Czech
Means "thicket" in Czech, a diminutive of háj "woods".
Hajós Hungarian
Means "boatman, sailor" in Hungarian.
Hakim Arabic
Derived from the given name Hakim.
Hale English
Derived from Old English halh meaning "nook, recess, hollow".
Haley English
From the name of an English town meaning "hay clearing", from Old English heg "hay" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Halvorsen Norwegian
Means "son of Halvor".
Hamilton English, Scottish
From an English place name, derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". This was the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists).
Hampton English
From the name of multiple towns in England, derived from Old English ham "home" or ham "water meadow, enclosure" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".