Surnames Categorized "isograms"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include isograms.
usage
Groß German
From Old High German groz meaning "tall, big".
Groves English
From Old English graf meaning "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
Guo Chinese
From Chinese (guō) meaning "outer city".
Gupta Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Punjabi, Telugu
Means "protected" in Sanskrit.
Guzmán Spanish
From the name of the town of Guzmán in Burgos, Spain. The town's name itself may be derived from an old Visigothic given name, from the Germanic elements *gautaz "a Geat" and *mannô "person, man".
Hagen Norwegian, Dutch
From Old Norse hagi or Old Dutch hago meaning "enclosure, pasture".
Haines English
Variant of Haynes.
Hájek Czech
Means "thicket" in Czech, a diminutive of háj "woods".
Hajós Hungarian
Means "boatman, sailor" in Hungarian.
Hakim Arabic
Derived from the given name Hakim.
Hale English
Derived from Old English halh meaning "nook, recess, hollow".
Haley English
From the name of an English town meaning "hay clearing", from Old English heg "hay" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Halvorsen Norwegian
Means "son of Halvor".
Hamilton English, Scottish
From an English place name, derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". This was the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists).
Hampton English
From the name of multiple towns in England, derived from Old English ham "home" or ham "water meadow, enclosure" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Han Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (hán) referring to the ancient state of Han, which existed from the 5th to 3rd centuries BC in what is now Shanxi and Henan provinces.
Harden English
From a place name meaning "hare valley" in Old English.
Harding English
Derived from the given name Heard. A famous bearer was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
Hardy English, French
From Old French and Middle English hardi meaning "bold, daring, hardy", from the Germanic root *harduz.
Harley English
Derived from a place name meaning "hare clearing", from Old English hara "hare" or hær "rock, heap of stones" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Hart English
Means "male deer". It was originally acquired by a person who lived in a place frequented by harts, or bore some resemblance to a hart.
Harvey English
From the Breton given name Haerviu (see Harvey).
Hase German
From Middle High German and Middle Low German hase meaning "hare, rabbit". This was a nickname for a person who was quick or timid.
Havlíček Czech
From a diminutive of the given name Havel.
Hawking English
From a diminutive of Hawk. A famous bearer was the British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-2018).
Hawkins English
From a diminutive of Hawk.
Hayden 1 English
From place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
Hayes 1 English
From various English place names that were derived from Old English hæg meaning "enclosure, fence". A famous bearer was American President Rutherford B. Hayes (1822-1893).
Hayes 2 Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó hAodha meaning "descendant of Aodh".
Haynes English
Patronymic derived from the Norman name Hagano.
He Chinese
From Chinese (), representing a southern pronunciation of the name of the ancient state of Han (see Han). After Han was destroyed by the state of Qin, those who resettled further south changed their name to this character in order to match the local pronunciation.
Head English
From Middle English hed meaning "head", from Old English heafod. It may have referred to a person who had a peculiar head, who lived near the head of a river or valley, or who served as the village headman.
Hearn Irish
Anglicized form of Ó hEachthighearna.
Heinz German
Derived from a diminutive of Heinrich.
Hendrix Dutch
Derived from the given name Hendrik. A famous bearer was the American rock musician Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970).
Henry English
Derived from the given name Henry.
Hepburn English, Scottish
From northern English place names meaning "high burial mound" in Old English. It was borne by Mary Queen of Scot's infamous third husband, James Hepburn, Earl of Bothwall. Other famous bearers include the actresses Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003) and Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
Herman English, Dutch
From the given name Herman.
Hermans Dutch, Flemish
Means "son of Herman".
Herzog German
From a German title meaning "duke", a nickname for a person who either acted like a duke or worked in a duke's household.
Hickey Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó hÍcidhe meaning "descendant of the healer".
Hicks English
Derived from the medieval given name Hicke, a diminutive of Richard.
Hidalgo Spanish
Means "nobleman" in Spanish. The Spanish word is a contraction of the phrase hijo de algo meaning "son of something". This surname was typically in origin a nickname or an occupational name for one who worked in a noble's household.
Hilton English
From various English place names derived from Old English hyll "hill" and tun "enclosure, town". Famous bearers of this name include the Hilton family of hotel heirs.
Hines Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó hEidhin meaning "descendant of Eidhin", a given name or byname of unknown origin.
Hirano Japanese
From Japanese (hira) meaning "level, even, peaceful" and (no) meaning "field, wilderness".
Ho Chinese (Cantonese), Chinese (Hokkien)
Cantonese and Min Nan romanization of He.
Hodges English
Patronymic of Hodge, a medieval diminutive of Roger.
Hofer German
Occupational name for a farmer, from German Hof "farm", from Old High German hof "yard, court".
Hogan Irish
From Irish Ó hÓgáin meaning "descendant of Ógán". The given name Ógán is a diminutive of óg meaning "young".
Holm Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Swedish, Danish and Norwegian holme, holm meaning "islet" (Old Norse holmr).
Holmes English, Scottish
Variant of Holme. A famous fictional bearer was Sherlock Holmes, a detective in Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887.
Holmgren Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish holme (Old Norse holmr) meaning "small island" and gren (Old Norse grein) meaning "branch".
Holst Danish, Low German, Dutch
Originally referred to a person from the region of Holstein between Germany and Denmark. A famous bearer of this name was the English composer Gustav Holst (1874-1934).
Holt English, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
From Old English, Old Dutch and Old Norse holt meaning "forest".
Hopkins English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Hob.
Horn English, German, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old English, Old High German and Old Norse word horn meaning "horn". This was an occupational name for one who carved objects out of horn or who played a horn, or a person who lived near a horn-shaped geographical feature, such as a mountain or a bend in a river.
Horne English
Variant of Horn.
Hou Chinese
From Chinese (hóu) meaning "lord, nobleman".
House English
Referred to a person who lived or worked in a house, as opposed to a smaller hut.
Howard 1 English
Derived from the given name Hughard or Hávarðr.
Howse English
Variant of Howe.
Hu Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "beard, whiskers, recklessly, wildly, barbarian".
Huang Chinese
From Chinese (huáng) meaning "yellow".
Huber German
Occupational name for a farmer, derived from Old High German huoba "plot of land, farm".
Hudson English
Means "son of Hudde".
Huerta Spanish
Means "garden, orchard" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin hortus.
Hume Scottish, English
Variant of Holme. A famous bearer was the philosopher David Hume (1711-1776).
Hunt English
Variant of Hunter.
Hunter English, Scottish
Occupational name that referred to someone who hunted for a living, from Old English hunta.
Hutson English
Variant of Hudson.
Hyland 1 English
Topographic name meaning "high land", from Old English heah and land.
I Korean
Variant of Lee 2.
Ibáñez Spanish
Means "son of Ibán".
Ibsen Danish
Means "son of Ib". A famous bearer was the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906).
Ingham English
From the name of an English town, of Old English origin meaning "Inga's homestead".
Ingram English
Derived from the given name Ingram.
Inoue Japanese
Means "above the well", from Japanese (i) meaning "well, mine shaft, pit", an unwritten possessive marker (no), and (ue) meaning "above, top, upper".
Isaev Russian
Means "son of Isay".
Ito Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 伊藤 (see Itō).
Jack English, Scottish
From the given name Jack.
Jackson English
Means "son of Jack". Famous bearers of this name are the American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) and the singer Michael Jackson (1958-2009).
Jacobs English, Dutch
Derived from the given name Jacob.
Jacobsen Danish
Means "son of Jacob".
Jacquet French
From a diminutive of the given name Jacques.
Jäger German
Means "hunter" in German, from Old High German jagon meaning "to hunt".
Jager German
Variant of Jäger.
James English
Derived from the given name James.
Jankovic Slovak
Means "son of Janko".
Jarvis English
Derived from the given name Gervais.
Jeong Korean
Korean form of Zheng, from Sino-Korean (jeong).
Jin Chinese
From Chinese (jīn) meaning "gold".
John English
Derived from the given name John. A famous bearer is British musician Elton John (1947-), born Reginald Dwight.
Johns English
Derived from the given name John.
Jones English, Welsh
Derived from the given name Jon, a medieval variant of John.
Jordan 1 English, French, German
Derived from the given name Jordan.
Jordan 2 Jewish
Derived from the name of the Jordan river, which is from Hebrew יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down".
Joseph English, French
Derived from the given name Joseph.
Joshi Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Nepali
From Sanskrit ज्योतिश (jyotisha) meaning "astronomer".
Joubert French
From the given name Gaubert.
Jung 2 Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul (see Jeong).
Kaiser German
From Middle High German keiser meaning "emperor", originally a nickname applied to someone who acted kingly. The title ultimately derives from the Roman name Caesar.
Kane Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Catháin.
Kang Korean
Korean form of Jiang 2, from Sino-Korean (gang).
Katz Jewish
Derived from Hebrew כֹּהֵן צֶדֶק (kohen tzedek) meaning "priest of justice", indicating a descendant of Aaron.
Kay 1 English
Derived from the given name Kay 2.
Kean Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Catháin.
Keaton English
From any of three English place names: Ketton in Rutland, Ketton in Durham or Keaton in Devon. The first is probably derived from an old river name or tribal name combined with Old English ea "river", with the spelling later influenced by tun "enclosure, yard, town". The second is from the Old English given name Catta or the Old Norse given name Káti combined with Old English tun. The third is possibly from Cornish kee "hedge, bank" combined with Old English tun.
Keith Scottish
From a place name that is probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles.
Key 1 English
Variant of Kay 1 or Kay 2.
Keys 1 English
Variant of Kay 1 or Kay 2.
Khan Urdu, Pashto, Bengali
From a title meaning "king, ruler", probably of Mongolian origin but used in many languages.
Kim Korean
Korean form of Jin, from Sino-Korean (gim) meaning "gold". This is the most common surname in Korea.
King English
From Old English cyning "king", originally a nickname for someone who either acted in a kingly manner or who worked for or was otherwise associated with a king. A famous bearer was the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968).
Kingsley English
From a place name meaning "king's clearing" in Old English.
Király Hungarian
Means "king" in Hungarian, of Slavic origin (a cognate of Król).
Kirch German
German cognate of Church.
Klein German, Dutch, Jewish
Means "small, little" from German klein or Yiddish kleyn. A famous bearer of this name is clothes designer Calvin Klein (1942-).
Knight English
From Old English cniht meaning "knight", a tenant serving as a mounted soldier.
Knowles English
From Middle English knoll, Old English cnoll meaning "small hill, knoll". A famous bearer is American singer Beyoncé Knowles (1981-).
Knox Scottish
From the name of various places in Scotland and northern England, derived from Scottish Gaelic cnoc "round hill".
Koch German
German cognate of Cook.
Koenig German
German cognate of King.
Kohl German
Derived from Middle High German kol "cabbage".
Köhler German
Variant of Kohler.
Kohler German
From Middle High German koler meaning "charcoal burner" or "charcoal seller".
König German
German cognate of King.
Kos Slovene
Means "blackbird" in Slovene.
Kranz German, Jewish
Derived from Old High German kranz meaning "wreath", an occupational name for a maker of wreaths or an ornamental Jewish name.
Kraus German
From Middle High German krus meaning "curly", originally a nickname for a person with curly hair.
Krause German
Variant of Kraus.
Krejči Czech
Means "tailor" in Czech.
Krupa Polish
Means "groats, grain" in Polish.
Kruse German
Variant of Kraus.
Kučera Czech
Means "curl" in Czech, a nickname for a person with curly locks of hair.
Kuhn German
Derived from a diminutive of the German given name Konrad.
Kuiper Dutch
Means "cooper, barrel maker" in Dutch.
Kuroda Japanese
From Japanese (kuro) meaning "black" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Kwan Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Guan.
Laird Scottish
Means "landowner" in Scots, derived from northern Middle English laverd "lord", from Old English hlafweard.
Lam Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Lin.
Lamb English
From the name of the animal, perhaps a nickname for a shy person.
Lambert French
Derived from the given name Lambert.
Lamberti Italian
Derived from the given name Lamberto.
Lamont Scottish
From the medieval Gaelic given name Lagmann, derived from Old Norse lǫgmaðr meaning "law man".
Lane 1 English
Originally designated one who lived by a lane, a narrow way between fences or hedges, later used of any narrow pathway, including one between houses in a town.
Lange German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian cognate of Long.
Langer German, Jewish
German cognate of Long.
Langford English
From any of various places in England with this name, derived from Old English lang "long" and ford "ford, river crossing".
Laurens Dutch
From the given name Laurens.
Laurent French
From the given name Laurent.
Lawson English
Means "son of Laurence 1".
Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Li 2, from Sino-Vietnamese (). This is the third most common surname in Vietnam.
Leach English
Originally indicated a person who was a physician, from the medieval practice of using leeches to bleed people of ills.
Leary Irish
Variant of O'Leary.
Lebrun French
From a nickname meaning "the brown", from French brun "brown".
Leigh English
Variant of Lee 1.
Leitz German
Derived from the archaic given name Leutz, a variant of Lutz.
Lenox Scottish
Variant of Lennox.
León 1 Spanish
Referred to a person from the city of León in northern Spain, derived from Latin legio (genitive legionis) meaning "legion", so named because the Roman 7th Legion Gemina was stationed there.
Leonard English
Derived from the given name Leonard.
Lewin English
Derived from the given name Leofwine.
Lewis 1 English
Derived from the given name Lewis. The author C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) was a bearer of this surname.
Lewis 2 Welsh
Anglicized form of Llywelyn.
Li 1 Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "plum, plum tree". This was the surname of Chinese emperors of the Tang dynasty.
Li 2 Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "black".
Liang Chinese
From Chinese (liáng) referring to the ancient state of Liang, which existed from the 8th to 7th centuries BC in what is now Shaanxi province.
Liao Chinese
From Chinese (liào) referring to the ancient state of Liao, which was located in present-day Henan province.
Liepa Latvian
Means "linden tree" in Latvian.
Lim Chinese (Hokkien)
Min Nan romanization of Lin.
Lin Chinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest".
Lindberg Swedish
From Swedish lind meaning "linden tree" and berg meaning "mountain".
Lindsay English, Scottish
From the region of Lindsey in Lincolnshire, which means "Lincoln island" in Old English.
Liu Chinese
From Chinese (liú) meaning "kill, destroy". This was the surname of Chinese emperors of the Han dynasty.
Logan Scottish
From a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow", derived from Gaelic lag "hollow, pit".
Long English
Originally a nickname for a person who had long limbs or who was tall.
Lopes Portuguese
Means "son of Lopo" in Portuguese.
López Spanish
Means "son of Lope" in Spanish.
Love English
From the Old English given name Lufu meaning "love".
Lowe 1 Jewish (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Löwe.
Lowry English, Scottish
From a diminutive of the given name Laurence 1.
Lucas English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch
Derived from the given name Lucas. A famous bearer of this surname is George Lucas (1944-), the creator of the Star Wars movies.
Ludwig German
From the given name Ludwig.
Lukács Hungarian
From the given name Lukács.
Luna Spanish
From various places in Spain meaning "moon".
Lynch Irish
From Irish Ó Loingsigh meaning "descendant of Loingseach", a given name meaning "mariner".
Lyne Scottish
Habitational name for someone who lived in places of this name in Scotland.
Lyon 1 English, French
Originally denoted a person from the city of Lyon in central France, originally Latin Lugdunum, of Gaulish origin meaning "hill fort of Lugus". It could also denote a person from the small town of Lyons-la-Forêt in Normandy.
Ma Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "horse".
Macy English
Variant of Massey.
Madison English
Means "son of Maud". A famous bearer of this surname was the fourth American president James Madison (1751-1836).
Maguire Irish
Variant of McGuire.
Major English
From the Norman French given name Mauger, derived from the Germanic name Malger.
Maki 2 Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" and (ki) meaning "tree".
Malone Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Maoil Eoin meaning "descendant of a disciple of Saint John".
Mandel German, Yiddish
Means "almond" in German, an occupational name for a grower or seller, or a topographic name for a person who lived near an almond tree. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
Marconi Italian
Derived from the given name Marco.
Marić Croatian, Serbian
Means "son of Marija".
Marion French
Derived from the given name Marion 1.
Mark English
Derived from the given name Mark.
Marley English
Originally denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in Britain called Marley, ultimately meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. One of the main characters in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol (1843) bears this surname.
Márquez Spanish
Means "son of Marcos".
Martí Catalan
Derived from the given name Martí.
Martin English, French, German, Swedish
Derived from the given name Martin. This is the most common surname in France.
Martínez Spanish
Means "son of Martín" in Spanish.
Martins English, Portuguese
Derived from the given name Martin.
Marvin English
Derived from the Welsh given name Merfyn or the Old English name Mærwine.
Mas 1 Catalan
Means "farmhouse" in Catalan.
Mason English
Occupational name for a stoneworker or layer of bricks, from Old French masson, of Frankish origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
Mathers English
Occupational name meaning "mower, cutter of hay" in Old English.
Mathews English
Derived from the given name Matthew.
Mathieu French
Derived from the given name Mathieu.
May English
Derived from the given name Matthew.
Mazur Polish
Indicated a person from either Mazovia (Polish Mazowsze) or Masuria (Polish Mazury), regions in Poland.
McAlister Scottish, Irish
From Scottish Gaelic MacAlastair or Irish Gaelic Mac Alastair meaning "son of Alistair".
McBride Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Giolla Bhrighde.
McGovern Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mag Shamhradháin meaning "son of Samhradháin", a given name meaning "summer".
McGuire Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Mag Uidhir meaning "son of Odhar", a given name meaning "pale-coloured".
McIntyre Scottish
From Scottish Gaelic Mac an tSaoir meaning "son of the carpenter".
McKay Scottish
Anglicized form of MacAoidh.
McKinley Scottish
Anglicized form of MacFhionnlaigh. This name was borne by the American president William McKinley (1843-1901), who was assassinated.
McLeod Scottish
From Gaelic MacLeòid meaning "son of Leod", a given name derived from Old Norse ljótr "ugly".
McNeil Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic MacNèill meaning "son of Niall".
McRae Scottish
From Gaelic Mag Raith meaning "son of Rath", a given name meaning "prosperity" or "grace".
McReynolds Scottish, Irish
Means "son of Reynold" in Gaelic.
Meadows English
Referred to one who lived in a meadow, from Old English mædwe.
Meir Jewish
Variant of Meyer 2.
Mejía Spanish
Possibly from a nickname derived from Spanish Mesías meaning "Messiah", from Latin Messias, ultimately from Biblical Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ (mashiyach) meaning "anointed".
Mendoza Spanish, Basque
From a Basque place name derived from mendi "mountain" and hotz "cold".
Mészáros Hungarian
Means "butcher" in Hungarian.
Michael English, German
From the given name Michael.
Michaels English
Derived from the given name Michael.
Milano Italian
Originally indicated someone who came from Milan.
Miles English
From the given name Miles.
Milton English
Derived from an English place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote "Paradise Lost".
Mishra Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "mixed, mingled, honourable" in Sanskrit.
Miura Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "three" and (ura) meaning "bay, inlet".
Moe Norwegian
Means "sandy ground" in Norwegian.
Molina Spanish
Means "mill" in Spanish.
Monk English
Nickname or occupational name for a person who worked for monks. This word is derived from Latin monachus, from Greek μοναχός (monachos) meaning "alone".
Montague English
From a Norman place name meaning "sharp mountain" in Old French.
Morales Spanish
Derived from Spanish moral meaning "mulberry tree", of Latin origin.
Moreau French
Derived from a diminutive of Maurus.
Morgan Welsh
Derived from the given name Morgan 1.
Morse English
Variant of Morriss.
Moser German
Name for someone who lived near a peat bog, from Middle High German mos.
Muir Scottish
Scots form of Moore 1. This name was borne by the Scottish-American naturalist John Muir (1838-1914).
Muñoz Spanish
Patronymic derived from the medieval Spanish given name Muño, from Latin Munnius, possibly of Germanic origin.
Murdoch Scottish
Scottish form of Murdock.
Murdock Irish
Derived from the given name Murchadh.
Murphy Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of Murchadh". This is the most common Irish surname.
Musiał Polish
Polish cognate of Musil.
Musil Czech
Possibly from a nickname meaning "the one who had to", from the past participle of the Czech verb muset meaning "must" (of Germanic origin).
Myers English
Patronymic form of Myer or Mayer 3.
Nagy Hungarian
From a nickname meaning "big, great" in Hungarian, referring to one's characteristics. This is the most common Hungarian surname.
Nash English
Derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015).
Newport English
Given to one who came from the town of Newport (which means simply "new port"), which was the name of several English towns.
Newton English
From the name of one of many English towns meaning "new town". A famous bearer was the English physicist Sir Isaac Newton (1643-1727).
Ng 1 Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Wu 1.
Nichols English
Derived from the given name Nichol.
Niles English
Means "son of Neil".
Noel French, English
Either from the given name Noël, or else derived directly from Old French noel "Christmas" and given to a person who had a particular connection with the holiday.
Noguchi Japanese
From Japanese (no) meaning "field, wilderness" and (kuchi) meaning "mouth, entrance".
Nogueira Portuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician nogueira meaning "walnut tree", from the Late Latin nucarius, ultimately from Latin nux meaning "nut".
Normand French
French form of Norman.
North English
Name for a person who lived to the north.
O Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul (see Oh).
Oakley English
From a place name meaning "oak clearing" in Old English. It was borne by American sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926).
O'Brien Irish
From the Irish Ó Briain meaning "descendant of Brian".
Oh Korean
Korean form of Wu 1, from Sino-Korean (o).
O'Hearn Irish
Anglicized form of Ó hEachthighearna.
Ojeda Spanish
From the name of the Ojeda river in Soria, Spain, possibly derived from Latin folia "leaves".
O'Leary Irish
From Irish Ó Laoghaire meaning "descendant of Laoghaire".
Oliver English, Catalan, German, French
Derived from the given name Oliver.
Olsen Norwegian, Danish
Means "son of Ole".
O'Neal Irish
From Irish Ó Néill meaning "descendant of Neil".
Ong Chinese (Hokkien)
Min Nan romanization of Wang 1.
Ortega Spanish
From a Spanish place name (belonging to various villages) derived from ortiga "nettle".
Ortiz Spanish
Means "son of Orti", a byname deriving either from Latin fortis meaning "brave, strong" or fortunius meaning "fortunate".
O'Shea Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Séaghdha.
Otis English
Means "son of Ode".
Owen Welsh
From the Welsh given name Owain.
Owens Welsh
From the Welsh given name Owain.
Pace Italian
Derived from the Italian given name Pace meaning "peace".
Page English, French
Occupational name meaning "servant, page". It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδίον (paidion) meaning "little boy".