Surnames Categorized "isograms"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include isograms.
usage
Pain English
Variant of Payne.
Paisley Scottish
From the name of a town near Glasgow, which may ultimately be derived from Latin basilica "church".
Palmer English
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
Parish 1 English
Originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris, which got its name from the ancient Celtic tribe known as the Parisii.
Park 1 Korean
From Sino-Korean 樸 or 朴 (bak) meaning "plain, unadorned, simple".
Park 2 English
From Middle English park, from Latin parricus, of Frankish origin. This was a name for someone who worked in or lived in a park.
Parkins English
Means "son of Parkin", a medieval diminutive of Peter.
Parks English
Patronymic form of Park 3.
Pastor Spanish
Means "shepherd" in Spanish.
Patrick English
From the given name Patrick.
Paul English, French, German, Dutch
From the given name Paul.
Paulson English
Means "son of Paul".
Paxton English
From an English place name meaning "Pœcc's town". Pœcc is an Old English name of unknown meaning.
Payne English
From a medieval given name or nickname derived from Latin paganus meaning "heathen, pagan" (from an earlier sense "rural, rustic"), which was given to children whose baptism had been postponed or adults who were not overly religious.
Payton English
From the name of the town of Peyton in Sussex. It means "Pæga's town".
Peak English
Originally indicated a dweller by a pointed hill, from Old English peac "peak". It could also denote a person from the Peak District in Derbyshire, England.
Peck 1 English
Variant of Peak.
Pei Chinese
From Chinese (péi), possibly referring to an ancient city.
Peña Spanish
Originally denoted a person who lived near a jutting rock, from Spanish peña meaning "rock, cliff".
Peng Chinese
From Chinese (péng) referring to the ancient state of Peng, which existed during the Shang dynasty in what is now Jiangsu province.
Perkins English
Means "son of Perkin", a medieval diminutive of Peter.
Petrosyan Armenian
Means "son of Petros" in Armenian.
Petrov Russian, Bulgarian
Means "son of Peter" in Russian and Bulgarian.
Phạm Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Fan, from Sino-Vietnamese (phạm). This is the fourth most common surname in Vietnam.
Picard French
Originally denoted a person from Picardy, a historical region of northern France. It is derived from Old French pic meaning "pike, spike".
Porsche German
Derived from the given name Boris.
Post Dutch, German, English
Indicated a person who lived near a post, ultimately from Latin postis.
Power 1 English, Irish
From Old French Poier, indicating a person who came from the town of Poix in Picardy, France.
Preston English
Originally derived from various place names meaning "priest town" in Old English.
Price Welsh
Derived from Welsh ap Rhys, which means "son of Rhys".
Pryce Welsh
Variant of Price.
Pugh Welsh
Derived from Welsh ap Hugh meaning "son of Hugh".
Puig Catalan
Catalan cognate of Poggio.
Putnam English
From Puttenham, the name of towns in Hertfordshire and Surrey in England, which mean "Putta's homestead".
Quigley Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Coigligh meaning "descendant of Coigleach", a given name meaning "untidy".
Quincy English
Originally from various place names in Normandy that were derived from the given name Quintus.
Quiñones Spanish
From various Spanish place names derived from quiñón meaning "shared piece of land", derived from Latin quinque "five".
Quirk Irish
Variant of Quirke.
Rae Scottish
Variant of McRae.
Raines English
Originally denoted a person from Rayne, Essex, England (possibly from an Old English word meaning "shelter") or from Rennes, Brittany, France (from the name of the Gaulish tribe of the Redones).
Rake English
Originally a name for a dweller on a narrow pass or hillside, from Old English hrace meaning "throat, gorge".
Ramos Spanish
Originally indicated a person who lived in a thickly wooded area, from Latin ramus meaning "branch".
Ramsey English, Scottish
Means "garlic island", derived from Old English hramsa "garlic" and eg "island". The surname was brought to Scotland by the Norman baron Simundus de Ramsay.
Ray English
Variant of Rey 1, Rey 2, Rye or Wray.
Read 1 English
Means "red" from Middle English read, probably denoting a person with red hair or complexion.
Regan Irish
Variant of Reagan.
Reid Scottish
Scots variant of Read 1.
Renault French
Derived from the given name Renaud.
Rey 1 English, Spanish, French, Catalan
Means "king" in Old French, Spanish and Catalan, ultimately from Latin rex (genitive regis), perhaps originally denoting someone who acted like a king.
Reynolds English
Derived from the given name Reynold.
Rhodes English
Topographic name derived from Old English rod meaning "cleared land", or a locational name from any of the locations named with this word.
Rice Welsh
Derived from the given name Rhys.
Richter German
Means "judge" in German, from Middle High German rihtære.
Ridge English
Denoted a person who lived near a ridge, from Old English hrycg.
Rigby English
Originally derived from the name of a town in Lancashire, itself from Old Norse hryggr "ridge" and býr "farm, settlement".
Riley 2 Irish
Variant of Reilly.
Ripley English
From the name of various English towns, from Old English rippel "grove, thicket" and leah "woodland, clearing". A notable fictional bearer is the character Ellen Ripley from the movie Alien (1979) and its sequels.
Rivas Spanish
Spanish form of Riva.
Roach English
From Middle English and Old French roche meaning "rock", from Late Latin rocca, a word that may be of Celtic origin. It indicated a person who lived near a prominent rock, or who came from a town by this name (such as Les Roches in Normandy).
Rocha Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician cognate of Roach.
Rodney English
From a place name meaning "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is an Old English given name meaning "fame").
Rojas Spanish
Variant of Rojo.
Roma Italian
Variant of Romano 2.
Román Spanish
From the given name Román.
Roman Romanian, Polish, Ukrainian
From the given name Roman.
Rome French, English
English and French form of Romano 2.
Rose 1 English, French, German, Jewish
Means "rose" from Middle English, Old French and Middle High German rose, all from Latin rosa. All denote a person of a rosy complexion or a person who lived in an area abundant with roses. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental, from Yiddish רויז (roiz).
Roth German, Jewish
From Middle High German rot meaning "red". It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair.
Rounds English
Patronymic derived from Middle English rond meaning "round, plump", ultimately from Latin rotundus.
Roux French
Derived from Old French ros meaning "red", from Latin russus, a nickname for a red-haired person.
Rowan Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin.
Rowe 1 English
Means "row" in Middle English, indicating a dweller by a row of hedges or houses.
Rowe 2 English
From the medieval name Row, which is either a variant of Roul or short form of Roland.
Roy 2 Scottish
From Gaelic ruadh meaning "red-haired".
Royce English
Originally derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of Rose.
Rózsa Hungarian
From the feminine given name Rózsa.
Rubio Spanish
Nickname for a person with red hair, from Latin rubeus "red".
Ruf German
From the given name Rolf.
Ruiz Spanish
Means "son of Ruy" in Spanish.
Rush English
Indicated a person who lived near rushes, the grasslike plant that grows in a marsh, from Old English rysc.
Ryan Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Riain, or else a simplified form of Mulryan.
Ryder English
Occupational name for a mounted warrior, from Old English ridere meaning "rider".
Şahin Turkish
Means "hawk" in Turkish (of Persian origin), probably used to refer to someone who was a hawk tamer.
Salem Arabic
From the given name Salim.
Samuel English, Welsh, French, Jewish
Derived from the given name Samuel.
Sánchez Spanish
Means "son of Sancho".
Sanchez Spanish
Unaccented variant of Sánchez.
Sander German, Danish
Derived from the given name Alexander.
Šarić Croatian, Serbian
Patronymic of (possibly) Serbo-Croatian šaren meaning "colourful, patterned".
Sato Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 佐藤 (see Satō).
Sauer German
Means "sour" in German, a nickname for an embittered or cantankerous person.
Sauter German
Occupational name for a cobbler, from Latin sutor "sewer, cobbler".
Sawyer English
Occupational name meaning "sawer of wood, woodcutter" in Middle English, ultimately from Old English sagu meaning "saw". Mark Twain used it for the main character in his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876).
Saylor English
Occupational name meaning "acrobat, dancer", derived from Old French sailleor, from Latin sallitor.
Schäfer German
From Old High German scaphare meaning "shepherd".
Schmidt German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German smit "smith, metalworker", a cognate of Smith.
Schmitz German
Variant of Schmidt, originating in the Rhine area in western Germany.
Schneider German, Jewish
From German schneider or Yiddish shnayder, making it a cognate of Snyder.
Schofield English
From various northern English place names, which were derived from Old Norse skáli "hut" and Old English feld "field".
Schuler German
Means "scholar, student" in German, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school".
Scola Italian
From Italian scuola meaning "school".
Scriven English
Occupational name meaning "writer, clerk, scribe" in Old French, derived from Latin scriba.
Segal 1 Jewish
From the Hebrew phrase סגן לויה (segan Lewiyah) meaning "assistant Levite".
Sexton English
Occupational name for a sexton (Middle English sexteyn), a caretaker for a church or graveyard.
Shapiro Jewish
Means "pretty, lovely" in Hebrew, from Aramaic.
Sharpe English
Variant of Sharp.
Shaw 1 English
Originally given to a person who lived near a prominent thicket, from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket, copse".
Shea Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Séaghdha.
Shelby English
Variant of Selby.
Shelton English
From the name of various English towns, meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
Shen Chinese
From Chinese (shēn) referring to the ancient state of Shen, which existed during the Zhou dynasty.
Sheridan Irish
From the Irish name Ó Sirideáin meaning "descendant of Sirideán". The given name Sirideán possibly means "searcher".
Sherman 1 English
Means "shear man", referring to someone who used shears in his line of work, such as a sheep-shearer.
Shin Korean
Korean form of Shen, from Sino-Korean (sin).
Shirley English
From an English place name, derived from Old English scir "bright" and leah "woodland, clearing".
Short English
From a nickname for a short person, from Middle English schort.
Sidney English
Originally derived from various place names in England meaning "wide island", from Old English sid "wide" and eg "island". Another theory holds that it comes from the name of a town in Normandy called "Saint Denis", though evidence for this is lacking.
Silva Portuguese, Spanish
From Spanish or Portuguese silva meaning "forest". This is the most common surname in Portugal and Brazil.
Silver English
From a nickname for a person with grey hair, from Old English seolfor "silver".
Simon English, French, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Jewish
Derived from the given name Simon 1.
Singh Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion". In 1699 Guru Gobind Singh gave all his Sikh male followers the surname Singh and all females Kaur. It is among the most common surnames in India.
Sjöberg Swedish
From Swedish sjö (Old Norse sær) meaning "lake, sea" and berg meaning "mountain".
Slade English
Derived from Old English slæd meaning "valley".
Sloane Irish
Variant of Sloan.
Smirnov Russian
Derived from Russian смирный (smirny) meaning "quiet, peaceful, timid". This is one of the most common surnames in Russia.
Smit Dutch
From Middle Dutch smit "metalworker, blacksmith", a cognate of Smith.
Smith English
Means "metalworker, blacksmith" from Old English smiþ, related to smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world. A famous bearer was the Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).
Smythe English
Variant of Smith.
Solak Turkish
From the nickname solak meaning "left-handed".
Son Korean
Korean form of Sun, from Sino-Korean (son).
Song Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (sòng) referring to the Song dynasty, which ruled China from 960 to 1279.
Spanò Sicilian
From Sicilian spanu meaning "sparse, thin hair", ultimately from Greek σπάνιος (spanios) meaning "scarce, rare".
Spear English
From Old English spere "spear", an occupational name for a hunter or a maker of spears, or a nickname for a thin person.
Spitz German
Means "sharp" in German, indicating the original bearer lived near a pointed hill.
Stacey English
Variant of Stacy.
Stack English
From a nickname for a big person, derived from Middle English stack "haystack", of Old Norse origin.
Stacy English
Derived from Stace, a medieval form of Eustace.
Stanford English
Derived from various English place names meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
Stanley English
From various place names meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904).
Stark English, German
From a nickname meaning "strong, rigid", from Old English stearc or Old High German stark.
Stein German, Jewish
From Old High German stein meaning "stone". It might indicate the original bearer lived near a prominent stone or worked as a stonecutter. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
Stern 2 German, Jewish
German cognate of Starr.
St John English
From a place named for Saint John.
Stone English
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or worked with stone, derived from Old English stan.
Strand Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse strǫnd meaning "beach, sea shore". It was originally given to someone who lived on or near the sea.
Strong English
Nickname derived from Middle English strong or strang meaning "strong".
Sturm German
Means "storm" in German, originally a nickname for a volatile person.
Suárez Spanish
Means "son of Suero".
Sumner English
Occupational name for a summoner, an official who was responsible for ensuring the appearance of witnesses in court, from Middle English sumner, ultimately from Latin submonere "to advise".
Sun Chinese
From Chinese (sūn) meaning "grandchild, descendant". A famous bearer of the surname was Sun Tzu, the 6th-century BC author of The Art of War.
Sutherland Scottish
Regional name for a person who came from the former county by this name in Scotland. It is derived from Old Norse suðr "south" and land "land", because it was south of the Norse colony of Orkney.
Swift English
Nickname for a quick person, from Old English swift.
Sýkora Czech, Slovak
Means "tit (bird)" in Czech and Slovak.
Szabó Hungarian
Means "tailor" in Hungarian.
Szőke Hungarian
Means "blond, fair haired" in Hungarian.
Tan Chinese (Hokkien)
Min Nan romanization of Chen.
Tang 1 Chinese
From Chinese (táng) referring to the Tang dynasty, which ruled China from 618 to 907.
Tasker English
From Middle English taske meaning "task, assignment". A tasker was a person who had a fixed job to do, particularly a person who threshed grain with a flail.
Taylor English
Derived from Old French tailleur meaning "tailor", ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut".
Thomas English, Welsh, French, German
Derived from the given name Thomas.
Thorn English, Danish
Originally applied to a person who lived in or near a thorn bush.
Thorpe English
From Old Norse þorp meaning "village".
Tjäder Swedish
Means "wood grouse" in Swedish.
Tobias English, German, Jewish
From the given name Tobias.
Tomczak Polish
From a diminutive of the given name Tomasz.
Tong Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Tang 1.
Tran Vietnamese
Simplified variant of Trần.
Tremblay French
From French tremble meaning "aspen". It is especially widespread in Quebec, being the most common surname there.
Troy English
Originally denoted a person from the city of Troyes in France.
Trump German
Derived from Middle High German trumbe meaning "drum". This surname is borne by the American president Donald Trump (1946-).
Tucker English
Occupational name for a fuller of cloth, derived from Old English tucian meaning "offend, torment". A fuller was a person who cleaned and thickened raw cloth by pounding it.
Tyler English
Occupational name for a tiler of roofs, derived from Old English tigele "tile". A famous bearer of this name was American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
Ueda Japanese
From Japanese (ue) meaning "above, top, upper" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Ughi Italian
From the given name Ugo.
Upton English
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many towns in England bearing this name. The place name itself is derived from Old English upp "up" and tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Ureña Spanish
Probably derived from the name of Urueña, a town in the province of Valladolid, Spain, which is of unknown meaning.
Valdez Spanish
Means "son of Baldo".
Vance English
Indicated a dweller by a fen, from Old English fenn meaning "fen, marsh".
Vásquez Spanish
Means "son of Vasco".
Vaughn Welsh
Variant of Vaughan.
Vega Spanish
From Spanish vega meaning "meadow, plain", of Basque origin.
Verona Italian
From the name of the city of Verona, one of the most important historical cities of northern Italy. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain.
Victor French, English
Derived from the male given name Victor.
Vidal Spanish, Catalan, French
From the given name Vidal.
Vitale Italian
From the given name Vitale.
Vogel German, Dutch
From Old High German and Old Dutch fogal meaning "bird". It was originally an occupational name for a bird catcher, or a nickname for a person who liked to sing.
Vogt German
Occupational name from Middle High German voget meaning "bailiff, administrator, steward", ultimately from Latin advocatus.
Vrubel Czech
From a nickname derived from Czech vrabec meaning "sparrow".
Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of Wu 2, from Sino-Vietnamese ().
Wade 1 English
Derived from the Old English place name wæd meaning "a ford".
Wagner German
From Middle High German wagener meaning "wagon maker, cartwright". This name was borne by the German composer Richard Wagner (1813-1883).
Waldo English
From the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Waltheof.
Walker English
Occupational name for a person who walked on damp raw cloth in order to thicken it. It is derived from Middle English walkere, Old English wealcan meaning "to move".
Walsh English, Irish
From Old English wælisc meaning "foreigner, stranger, Celt".
Walters English
Derived from the given name Walter.
Walton English
From the name of any of several villages in England, derived from Old English wealh "foreigner, Celt", weald "forest", weall "wall", or wille "well, spring, water hole" combined with tun "enclosure, yard, town".
Waltz German
From a diminutive of the given name Walther.
Wang 1 Chinese
From Chinese (wáng) meaning "king, monarch". This is the most common surname in China (and the world).
Ward 1 English
Derived from Old English weard meaning "guard, guardian".
Ware 1 English
From Old English wer meaning "dam, weir", indicating someone who lived near such a structure.
Waters 1 English
Originally given to a person who lived near the water.
Watkins English
Derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, which was a diminutive of the name Walter.
Watson English, Scottish
Patronymic derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name Walter.
Way English
From Old English weg meaning "way, road, path".
Wei Chinese
From Chinese (wèi) referring to the ancient state of Wei, which existed from the 5th to 3rd centuries BC in what is now Henan, Hebei, Shanxi, and Shandong provinces.
Welch English
Variant of Walsh.
Wen Chinese
From Chinese (wén) meaning "literature, culture, writing".
West English, German
Denoted a person who lived to the west of something, or who came from the west.
Whelan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Faoláin meaning "descendant of Faolán".
Whitaker English
From a place name composed of Old English hwit "white" and æcer "field".
White English
Originally a nickname for a person who had white hair or a pale complexion, from Old English hwit "white".
Whitney English
Originally from the name of an English town, meaning "white island" in Old English.
Wickham English
From any of various towns by this name in England, notably in Hampshire. They are derived from Old English wic "village, town" (of Latin origin) and ham "home, settlement".
Wild English, German
Means "wild, untamed, uncontrolled", derived from Old English wilde. This was either a nickname for a person who behaved in a wild manner or a topographic name for someone who lived on overgrown land.
Wilson English
Means "son of Will". A famous bearer was the American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
Wilton English
From any of the English towns named Wilton.
Windsor English
From the name of a few English towns, one notably the site of Windsor Castle. Their names mean "riverbank with a windlass" in Old English, a windlass being a lifting apparatus. In 1917 the British royal family adopted this name (after Windsor Castle), replacing their previous name Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.
Winkler German
Derived from Old High German winkil meaning "corner".
Winter English, German, Swedish
From Old English winter or Old High German wintar meaning "winter". This was a nickname for a person with a cold personality.
Winthrop English
Habitational name from the place names Winthrope 1 or Winthrope 2.
Wolf German, English
From Middle High German or Middle English wolf meaning "wolf", or else from an Old German given name beginning with this element.
Wolfe English
Variant of Wolf.
Wong 1 Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Wang 1.
Woźniak Polish
From Polish woźny meaning "caretaker, clerk".
Wray English
Originally denoted someone who came from any of the various places of this name in northern England, from Old Norse vrá meaning "corner, nook".
Wright 1 English
From Old English wyrhta meaning "wright, maker", an occupational name for someone who was a craftsman. Famous bearers were Orville and Wilbur Wright, the inventors of the first successful airplane.
Wu 1 Chinese
From Chinese () referring to the ancient state of Wu, which was located in present-day Jiangsu province.
Wyman English
From the Old English given name Wigmund.
Xiao Chinese
From Chinese (xiāo) referring to the fiefdom or territory of Xiao (in present-day Anhui province) that existed during the Zhou dynasty.
Xie Chinese
From Chinese (xiè) referring to the minor state of Xie, which existed in what is now Hubei province.
Xu 1 Chinese
From Chinese () referring to the ancient state of Xu, which existed to the 6th century BC in what is now Jiangsu and Anhui. The character means "slowly, calmly".
Yang Chinese
From Chinese (yáng) meaning "willow, poplar, aspen".
Yates English
From Old English geat meaning "gate", a name for a gatekeeper or someone who lived near a gate.
Ye Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "leaf".
Yi Korean
Variant of Lee 2.
Yılmaz Turkish
From the given name Yılmaz.
York English
From the name of the English city of York, which was originally called Eburacon (Latinized as Eboracum), meaning "yew" in Brythonic. In the Anglo-Saxon period it was corrupted to Eoforwic, based on Old English eofor "boar" and wic "village". This was rendered as Jórvík by the Vikings and eventually reduced to York.
Young English
Derived from Old English geong meaning "young". This was a descriptive name to distinguish father from son.
Yount German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Jundt.
Yu 1 Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "in, on, at". According to legend, King Wu of Zhou bestowed the realm of Yu to his second son, who subsequently adopted this as his surname.
Yuan Chinese
From Chinese (yuán), (yuán) or (yuán), which mean "origin, source".
Zeng Chinese
From Chinese (zēng) referring to the former state of Zeng, which existed during the Zhou dynasty in what is now Hubei province.
Zhang Chinese
From Chinese (zhāng) meaning "stretch, extend". It may have denoted a bowmaker whose job it was to stretch bow wood.
Zhao Chinese
From Chinese (zhào), which refers to an ancient city-state in what is now Shanxi province. According to legend, King Mu rewarded his chariot driver Zaofu with the city, at which time Zaofu adopted this surname. The later historic state of Zhao, which existed from the 5th to 3rd centuries BC, was named after this city.... [more]
Zhou Chinese
From Chinese (zhōu) referring to the Zhou dynasty, which held power from 1046 to 771 BC, continuing for a few more centuries as figureheads.
Zhu Chinese
From Chinese (zhū) meaning "vermilion red, cinnabar" and also referring to the ancient state of Zhu, which existed in what is now Shandong province. This was the surname of the emperors of the Ming dynasty.
Zuñiga Basque
From the name of a Spanish town, formerly named Estuniga in Basque, possibly derived from Basque istuin "channel, strait".