Surnames Categorized "trees"

This is a list of surnames in which the categories include trees.
 more filters (1)
AHLBERG Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish al "alder" and berg "mountain".
AHLGREN Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish al "alder" and gren "branch".
AHLSTRÖM Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish al "alder" and ström "stream".
AINSLEY Scots
From a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALAMILLA Spanish
From Spanish alamillo meaning "poplar, aspen".
ALBERO Italian
From Italian albero meaning "tree", ultimately from Latin arbor, referring to someone who lived in the woods or worked as a woodcutter.
ALBUQUERQUE Portuguese
From the name of the Spanish town of Alburquerque, near the Portuguese border in the province of Badajoz. It is probably derived from Latin alba quercus meaning "white oak".
ALMÁSSY Hungarian
Derived from Hungarian alma meaning "apple", perhaps originally referring to a person who harvested or sold apples.
ALMSTEDT Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish alm "elm" and stad "town".
APELDOORN Dutch
From the name of a city in the Netherlands, meaning "apple tree" in Dutch.
APPELHOF Dutch
Indicated a person who lived by or at an apple garden, from Dutch appel "apple" and hof "garden, courtyard".
APPELO Dutch
Indicated a person who was from a farm called Aperloo, probably a derivative of appel meaning "apple".
APPERLO Dutch
Variant of APPELO.
APPLEBY English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English æppel "apple" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
APPLETON English
From the name of several English towns, meaning "orchard" in Old English (a compound of æppel "apple" and tun "enclosure, yard").
ARBORE Italian
From Latin arbor meaning "tree".
ARCE Spanish
Means "maple tree" in Spanish.
ARDELEAN Romanian
From the Romanian region of Ardeal, also called Transylvania. It is possibly derived from Hungarian erdő meaning "forest".
ARECHAVALETA Spanish
Originally indicated a person from the town of Aretxabaleta in Spain. It means "oak trees" in Basque.
ARITZA Spanish, Basque
From Basque aritz meaning "oak tree". This was a nickname of Iñigo, the first king of Pamplona, Spain (9th century).
ASH English
From Old English æsc meaning "ash tree", indicating a person who lived near ash trees.
ASHLEY English
Denoted a person hailing from one of the many places in England that bear this name. The place name itself is derived from Old English æsc "ash tree" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ASHWORTH English
From an English place name meaning "ash enclosure" in Old English.
ASSELMAN Dutch
Denoted a person from Assel, Asselt or Hasselt, the name of communities in the Netherlands and Belgium. They derive from Germanic asc "ash tree" and lauha "woods on sandy soil", or hasal "hazel tree".
ASSENBERG Dutch
From Dutch es meaning "ash tree" (plural essen) and berg meaning "mountain".
ASSENDORP Dutch
From the name of a place called Assendorp, composed of Dutch essen and dorp, meaning "ash tree village".
ATWOOD English
From Middle English meaning "dweller at the wood".
AUDLEY English
From a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AVERESCH Dutch
From a place name, possibly from a dialectal variation of Dutch over meaning "over" combined with esch meaning "ash tree".
BADEM Turkish
Derived from a Turkish word meaning "almond".
BAGLEY English
From various English place names, all derived from Old English bagga "bag, badger" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
BARDSLEY English
From the name a village near Manchester, from the Old English given name BEORNRÆD and leah "woodland, clearing".
BASURTO Spanish
From the Basque place name Basurtu, a village (now part of Bilbao) in Biscay. It means "middle of the forest".
BAUM German, Jewish
Means "tree" in German.
BAUMBACH German
From a place name meaning "tree stream" in German.
BAUMER German
Variant of BAUM.
BAUMGARTNER German
Occupational name for a person who worked or lived at an orchard, from German Baumgarten "orchard" (derived from Baum "tree" and Garten "garden").
BAUMHAUER German
Occupational name meaning "woodcutter", derived from German Baum "tree" and hauen "to chop".
BEASLEY English
From the name of a place in Lancashire, from Old English beos "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BEAUCHÊNE French
From French place names derived from beau "beautiful" and chêne "oak".
BENTLEY English
From a place name derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BERGLUND Swedish
Ornamental name from Swedish berg "mountain" and lund "grove".
BĒRZIŅŠ Latvian
From Latvian bērzs meaning "birch tree".
BEZUIDENHOUT Dutch
From Dutch zuid "south" and hout "forest". It refers to the south of the forest in The Hague.
BJÖRK Swedish
From Swedish björk "birch tree".
BJÖRKMAN Swedish
From Swedish björk "birch tree" and man "man".
BLACKWOOD English, Scottish
From an English place name meaning "black wood".
BLOMGREN Swedish
From Swedish blomma meaning "flower" and gren meaning "branch".
BOSCH (1) Dutch, Low German
Derived from Middle Dutch bosch meaning "wood, forest".
BOSCH (2) Catalan
Catalan cognate of BOSCO.
BOSCO Italian
Means "forest" in Italian.
BOSQUE Spanish
Spanish form of BOSCO.
BOYCE English
From Old French bois meaning "wood", originally given to someone who lived by or in a wood.
BRADDOCK English
From various locations derived from Old English meaning "broad oak".
BRISBOIS French
Referred to a person who cleared land, from Old French briser "to cut" and bois "forest".
BRZEZICKI Polish
Derived from Polish brzezina meaning "birch grove".
BUCHHOLZ German
From Middle High German buoche "beech" and holz "wood".
BUCKLEY (1) English
From an English place name derived from bucc "buck, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".
BÜKI Hungarian
Derived from the name of the Bükk Mountains, which means "beech tree" in Hungarian (probably of Slavic origin).
BUKOWSKI Polish
Originally denoted someone who came from a place called Bukowo or Bukowiec, which derive from Polish buk "beech".
BYQUIST Swedish
Derived from Swedish by "village" and qvist "twig, branch".
CHASTAIN French
From Old French castan "chestnut tree" (Latin castanea), a name for someone who lived near a particular chestnut tree, or possibly a nickname for someone with chestnut-coloured hair.
COLLINGWOOD English
From a place name, itself derived from Old French chalenge meaning "disputed" and Middle English wode meaning "woods".
COLQUHOUN Scottish
From a place name meaning "narrow corner" or "narrow wood" in Gaelic.
COUTTS Scottish
From the name of the town of Cults in Aberdeenshire, derived from a Gaelic word meaning "woods".
DARROW Scottish
Habitational name from Darroch near Falkirk, in Stirlingshire, said to be named from Gaelic darach meaning "oak tree".
DEFOREST French
Means "from the forest" in French.
DELANEY (1) English
Derived from Norman French de l'aunaie meaning "from the alder grove".
DEL BOSQUE Spanish
Means "of the forest" in Spanish.
DEL OLMO Spanish
Variant of OLMO.
DE PALMA Italian
Means "from the palm tree" in Italian.
DEVEREUX English
Indicated a person from Evreux in France, itself named after the Gaulish tribe of the Eburovices, which was probably derived from a Celtic word meaning "yew".
DOUBEK Czech
Means "small oak" in Czech, derived from dub "oak".
DUBOIS French
Means "from the forest", from French bois "forest".
EGLĪTIS Latvian
From Latvian egle meaning "spruce tree".
EICHEL German
Means "acorn" in German, indicating a person who lived near an oak tree.
EIKENBOOM Dutch
Means "oak tree", from Dutch eik "oak" and boom "tree".
EK Swedish
Means "oak" in Swedish.
EKLUND Swedish
From Swedish ek "oak" and lund "grove".
ELZINGA Dutch
Probably from a place name that was a derivative of Dutch els meaning "alder tree".
ERDŐS Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "forester", derived from Hungarian erdő "forest".
ESCÁRCEGA Spanish
Derived from the Basque place name Eskarzaga, which itself is derived from Basque hazkar "maple".
EVERLY English
From place names meaning derived from Old English eofor "boar" and leah "woodland, clearing"..
FAY French, English
Referred to a person who came from various places named Fay or Faye in northern France, derived from Old French fau "beech tree", from Latin fagus.
FEIGENBAUM German, Jewish
Means "fig tree" in German.
FOREST English, French
Originally belonged to a person who lived near or in a forest. It was probably originally derived, via Old French forest, from Latin forestam (silva) meaning "outer (wood)".
FORESTER English
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see FOREST).
FORESTIER French
French cognate of FORESTER.
FORST German
Derived from Old High German forst "forest". Probably unrelated to the Old French word forest, which was derived from Latin, Old High German forst was derived from foraha meaning "fir tree".
FÖRSTNER German
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest (see FORST).
GAJOS Polish
Derived from Polish gaj meaning "grove, thicket".
GRAHN Swedish
From Swedish gran meaning "spruce".
GROVES English
From Old English graf meaning "grove". This originally indicated a person who lived near a grove (a group of trees).
GRÜNEWALD German
Means "green forest" from German grün "green" and Wald "forest".
GWÓZDEK Polish
Derived from either archaic Polish gwozd meaning "forest" or gwóźdź meaning "nail".
HÁJEK Czech
Means "thicket" in Czech, a diminutive of háj "woods".
HARGRAVE English
Derived from Old English har meaning "grey" and graf "grove".
HARLEY English
Derived from a place name meaning "hare clearing", from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HAYASHI Japanese
From Japanese (hayashi) meaning "forest".
HAYWARD English
Occupational name for a person who protected an enclosed forest, from Old English hæg "enclosure, fence" and weard "guard".
HAYWOOD English
From various place names meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HOLLINS English
Referred to someone living by a group of holly trees, from Old English holegn.
HOLME English, Scottish
Referred either to someone living by a small island (northern Middle English holm, from Old Norse holmr) or near a holly tree (Middle English holm, from Old English holegn).
HOLMES English, Scottish
Variant of HOLME. A famous fictional bearer was Sherlock Holmes, a detective in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887.
HOLT English, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
From Old English, Old Dutch and Old Norse holt meaning "forest".
HOLTZ German
German cognate of HOLT.
HÖLZER German
German cognate of HOLT.
HOLZER German
German cognate of HOLT.
HOLZKNECHT German
Occupational name for a forester's helper, from Old High German holz "wood" and kneht "servant, apprentice".
HOLZMANN German
Derived from Old High German holz "wood" and man "man", a name for someone who lived close to a wood or worked with wood.
HOMEWOOD English
From various place names derived from Old English ham meaning "home" and wudu meaning "wood".
HOUTMAN Dutch
Dutch cognate of HOLZMANN.
HUERTA Spanish
Means "garden, orchard" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin hortus.
HULT Swedish
Swedish form of HOLT.
HUME Scottish, English
Variant of HOLME. A famous bearer was the philosopher David Hume (1711-1776).
HURST English
Originally a name for a person who lived near a thicket of trees, from Old English hyrst "thicket".
HUXLEY English
From the name of a town in Cheshire. The final element is Old English leah "woodland, clearing", while the first element might be hux "insult, scorn". A famous bearer was the British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963).
JEDLIČKA Czech
Derived from Czech jedle meaning "fir tree", perhaps given to a person who lived near a prominent one.
KEITH Scottish
From a place name that is probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles.
KELLY (2) Scottish
From a Scottish place name derived from coille meaning "grove".
KIEFER (1) German
Means "pine tree" in German.
KIMURA Japanese
From Japanese (ki) meaning "tree, wood" and (mura) meaning "town, village".
KINGSLEY English
From a place name meaning "king's clearing" in Old English.
KOBAYASHI Japanese
From Japanese (ko) meaning "small" and (hayashi) meaning "forest".
LAGER Swedish
Means "laurel" in Swedish.
LAM Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of LIN.
LANGLEY (1) English
From any of the various places with this name, all derived from Old English lang "long" and leah "woodland, clearing".
LAURENZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LEE (1) English
Originally given to a person who lived on or near a leah, Old English meaning "woodland, clearing".
LEHTONEN Finnish
Derived from Finnish lehto meaning "grove, small forest".
LEIGH English
Variant of LEE (1).
LENNOX Scottish
From the name of a district in Scotland, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly meaning "place of elms".
LENOX Scottish
Variant of LENNOX.
LESLIE Scottish
From a Scottish clan name, earlier Lesselyn, derived from a place name in Aberdeenshire, itself probably from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly".
LI (1) Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "plum, plum tree". This was the surname of Chinese emperors of the Tang dynasty.
LIEPIŅŠ Latvian
From Latvian liepa meaning "linden tree".
LIM Taiwanese
Min Nan romanization of LIN.
LIN Chinese
From Chinese (lín) meaning "forest".
LINDBERG Swedish
From Swedish lind "linden tree" and berg "mountain".
LINDEN German
Derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
LINDGREN Swedish
From Swedish lind "linden tree" and gren "branch". A famous bearer of this name was Swedish author Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002).
LINDHOLM Swedish
From Swedish lind "linden tree" and holme "small island".
LINDON English
Variant of LYNDON.
LINDQUIST Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish lind "linden tree" and qvist "twig, branch".
LINDSTRÖM Swedish
Derived from Swedish lind "linden tree" and ström "stream".
LINTON English
Originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "linden tree town" in Old English.
LINWOOD English
Originally from place names meaning "linden tree forest" in Old English.
LOCKWOOD English
From an English place name meaning "enclosed wood".
LÖFGREN Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish löv "leaf" and gren "branch".
LUND Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English
Indicated a person who lived near a grove of trees, from Old Norse lundr meaning "grove". There are towns in Sweden and Britain called Lund.
LUNDBERG Swedish
Derived from Swedish lund "grove" and berg "mountain".
LUNDGREN Swedish
Derived from Swedish lund "grove" and gren "branch".
LUNDQUIST Swedish
Derived from Swedish lund "grove" and qvist "twig, branch".
LYNDON English
Originally from a place name meaning "linden tree hill" in Old English.
LYNTON English
Variant of LINTON.
MADEIRA Portuguese
Occupational name for a carpenter, from Portuguese madeira "wood".
MAKI (2) Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" and (ki) meaning "tree".
MANDEL German, Yiddish
Means "almond" in German, an occupational name for a grower or seller, or a topographic name for a person who lived near an almond tree. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
MANDELBAUM Jewish
Means "almond tree" in German.
MARLEY English
Originally denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places in Britain called Marley, ultimately meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. One of the main characters in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol (1843) bears this surname.
MATA Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan
From Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan mata meaning "trees, shrubs", possibly from Late Latin matta meaning "reed mat".
MATSUMOTO Japanese
From one of the many places with this name in Japan, derived from Japanese (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree" and (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
MATSUOKA Japanese
From Japanese (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree" and (oka) meaning "ridge, hill".
MATSUSHITA Japanese
From Japanese (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree" and (shita) meaning "under, below".
MIDGLEY English
From the English village of Midgley in West Yorkshire, meaning "midge (insect) wood" in Old English.
MORALES Spanish
Derived from Spanish moral meaning "mulberry tree", of Latin origin.
MORI Japanese
From Japanese (mori) meaning "forest".
MURTAS Sardinian
From Sardinian murta meaning "myrtle".
NASH English
Derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015).
NOGUEIRA Portuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician nogueira meaning "walnut tree", from the Late Latin nucarius, ultimately from Latin nux meaning "nut".
NOGUERA Spanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan form of NOGUEIRA.
NORDSKOV Danish
Means "north woods" in Danish.
NORWOOD English
Originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
NOYER French
French form of NOGUEIRA.
NUSSBAUM German, Jewish
Means "nut tree", derived from the German Nuss "nut" and Baum "tree".
NYLUND Swedish
From Swedish ny "new" and lund "grove".
OAKLEY English
From a place name meaning "oak clearing" in Old English. It was borne by American sharpshooter Annie Oakley (1860-1926).
Ó CUILINN Irish
Means "descendant of Cuileann", Cuileann being a nickname meaning "holly".
OGDEN English
From a place name derived from Old English ac "oak" and denu "valley".
OLEASTRO Spanish
Means "wild olive" in Spanish, originally indicating one who lived near such a tree.
OLMO Spanish
Means "elm tree" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin ulmus. The name originally indicated a person who lived near such a tree.
OLMOS Spanish
Variant of OLMO.
OMDAHL Norwegian
Denoted a person hailing from any one of a number of farms in Norway called either Åmdal or Omdal meaning "elm valley".
OZOLIŅŠ Latvian
From Latvian ozols meaning "oak tree".
OZOLINSH Latvian
Anglicized form of OZOLIŅŠ.
OZOLS Latvian
Means "oak tree" in Latvian.
PALMEIRO Portuguese
Portuguese form of PALMER.
PALMER English
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PEERENBOOM Dutch
From Dutch meaning "pear tree", referring to someone who lived or worked at a pear orchard.
PENSAK Yiddish
Variant of PENZIG.
PENZAK Yiddish
Variant of PENZIG.
PENZIG Yiddish
Denoted a person who came from Penzig, the German name for Pieńsk, a town in southwest Poland. It is derived from Polish pień meaning "stump, tree trunk".
PENZIK Yiddish
Variant of PENZIG.
PEREIRA Portuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician pereira meaning "pear tree", ultimately from Latin pirum meaning "pear".
PERRY (1) English
From Old English pirige meaning "pear tree", a derivative of peru meaning "pear", itself from Latin pirum. A famous bearer was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
PILKVIST Swedish
From Swedish pil "willow" and qvist "twig, branch".
PINHEIRO Portuguese
Means "pine tree" in Portuguese.
PINHO Portuguese
Habitational name meaning "pine" in Portuguese.
PINI Italian
Name for a person who lived near a pine tree, from Italian pino, Latin pinus.
POIRIER French
Means "pear tree" in French, originally a nickname for someone who lived close to such a tree.
RAMOS Spanish
Originally indicated a person who lived in a thickly wooded area, from Latin ramus meaning "branch".
REIS German, Jewish
From Middle High German ris meaning "twig, branch, bush", denoting a person who lived in an overgrown area. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
RHEE Korean
North Korean form of LEE (2).
RHODES English
Topographic name derived from Old English rod meaning "cleared land", or a locational name from any of the locations named with this word.
RIDLEY English
Denoted a person who hailed from one of the various places of this name in England. The places are derived from Old English geryd "channel" or hreod "reed" combined with leah "woodland, clearing".
ROBLEDO Spanish
Means "oak wood" from Spanish roble "oak", ultimately from Latin robur.
ROBLES Spanish
Originally indicated a person who lived near an oak tree or forest, from Spanish roble "oak", from Latin robur.
ROSCOE English
From the name of a town in Lancashire, derived from Old Norse "roebuck" and skógr "wood, forest".
ROWAN Irish
Anglicized form of Ó RUADHÁIN.
ROWNTREE English
Originally given to a person who lived near a rowan tree or mountain ash.
SADOWSKI Polish
Denoted someone who lived in Sadowo, Sadowice or other places beginning with Polish sad "garden, orchard".
SALCEDO Spanish
Derived from Latin salix meaning "willow tree". The name was originally given to one who lived near a willow tree.
SALLER (2) German
Denoted a person who lived by a prominent sallow tree, from Middle High German salhe "sallow tree".
SANDOVAL Spanish
Derived from the name of a town in Spain, ultimately from Latin saltus "forest, glade" and novalis "unploughed land".
SASAKI Japanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "help, aid" (repeated, indicated by the iteration mark ) and (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
SAULT French
French cognate of SOTO.
SCHOORL Dutch
Originally indicated a person from the town of Schoorl in the province of Noord-Holland in the Netherlands. It means "forest by the shore" in Dutch.
SCHOREL Dutch
Variant of SCHOORL.
SELBY English
From the name of a village that meant "willow farm" in Old English.
SHAW (1) English
Originally given to a person who lived near a prominent thicket, from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket, copse".
SHELBY English
Variant of SELBY.
SILVA Portuguese, Spanish
From Spanish or Portuguese silva meaning "forest".
SILVEIRA Portuguese
Means "forests" in Portuguese.
SKOVGAARD Danish
From a place name, derived from Danish skov "wood, forest" and gård "farm, yard".
SOMOGYI Hungarian
Originally indicated a person from Somogy, a region within Hungary. It may be derived from Hungarian som meaning "cornel tree".
SOTO Spanish
Means "grove of trees, small forest" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin saltus.
SOUČEK Czech
From Czech suk meaning "tree knot". This could either be a topographic name or a nickname for a stubborn person.
SUZUKI Japanese
From Japanese (suzu) meaning "bell" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood". This is the second most common surname in Japan.
SWINDLEHURST English
From the place name Swinglehurst in the Forest of Bowland in central Lancashire, derived from Old English swin "swine, pig", hyll "hill" and hyrst "wood, grove".
SZILÁGYI Hungarian
Denoted one from the region of Szilágy in Hungary, derived from Hungarian szil meaning "elm" and ágy meaning "bed".
TASH English
From Middle English at asche meaning "at the ash tree".
TER AVEST Dutch
Means "at the edge, eave" indicating a person who lived at the edge of a forest or under a covered shelter.
THWAITE English
Indicated a dweller in a forest clearing or pasture, from Old Norse þveit "clearing, pasture".
TIMBERLAKE English
From an English place name, derived from Old English timber "timber, wood" and lacu "lake, pool, stream".
TREMBLAY French
From French tremble meaning "aspen".
TUFF English
Variant of TUFT.
TUFT English
Denoted one who lived near a clump of trees or bushes, from Middle English tufte "tuft, clump", from Old French.
UNDERWOOD English
Means "dweller at the edge of the woods", from Old English under and wudu.
URQUHART Scottish
Derived from Brythonic ar "by" and cardden "thicket". This is the name of several places, the most famous being north of Loch Ness.
VAN ANDEL Dutch
Means "from Andel", a town in the Netherlands, possibly meaning "upper forest" in Old Dutch.
VAN AS Dutch
Means "from Asch", a town in the Netherlands, meaning "ash tree".
VAN ASCH Dutch
Variant of VAN AS.
VAN ASSEN Dutch
Means "from Assen", a city in the Netherlands, which is possibly from essen meaning "ash trees".
VAN DE VLIERT Dutch
Means "from the elderberry" in Dutch.
VAN HASSEL Dutch
Means "from Hassel", a town in Lower Saxony, Germany. It may be derived from Germanic hasel meaning "hazel tree".
VAN HOUTEN Dutch
Means "from forests", derived from Dutch hout "forest".
VAN LAAR Dutch
Derived from Dutch laar (plural laren), which means "open spot in the forest". These areas were used to graze cattle for example.
VAN ROSSUM Dutch
Means "from Rossum", a town in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands. It is mentioned as Rotheheim in a 9th-century document, and is derived from Dutch rothe "cleared area in a forest" and heim "home".
VAN WILLIGEN Dutch
Means "from the willows", from Old Dutch wilga "willow".
VERBOOM Dutch
Means "from the tree" in Dutch.
VERNON English
Locational name in the Eure region of Normandy, from the Gaulish element vern "alder (tree)" with the genitive case maker onis.
VON ESSEN German
Means "from Essen", a city in Germany, possibly a derivative of Old High German asc meaning "ash tree".
WALDVOGEL Jewish
Ornamental name derived from German Wald meaning "forest" and Vogel meaning "bird".
WALTON English
From the name of any of several villages in England, derived from Old English wealh "foreigner, Celt", weald "forest", weall "wall", or well "well, spring, water hole" combined with tun "enclosure".
WESTLEY English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English west "west" and leah "woodland, clearing".
WILLOUGHBY English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English wilig meaning "willow" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
WILTON English
From any of the English towns named WILTON.
WOMACK English
Of uncertain origin. One theory suggests that it indicated a dweller by a hollow oak tree, derived from Old English womb "hollow" and ac "oak".
WOOD English, Scottish
Originally denoted one who lived in or worked in a forest, derived from Old English wudu "wood".
WOODHAM English
Indicated a person who had a home near a wood, derived from Old English wudu "wood" and ham "home, settlement".