Celtic Submitted Surnames

These names are used by Celtic peoples.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Rhine German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
Rhys Welsh
In addition to being used as a given name, it occurs as a surname both alone and in combination with other surnames. Related patronymic forms of the surname are Price, Prys, Pris and Preece. A notable bearer is John Rhys-Davies.
Rian Irish (Anglicized, Rare, ?)
An alternate spelling and pronunciation of Ó Riain, due to French influences after the progenitors of the family moved to France from Ireland.
Roan Irish
variant of Roane
Roane Irish
Variant spelling of Rowan or possibly a variant of Ruane.
Roddy Irish, Welsh
Derived from the Gaelic name Ó Rodaigh and linked to the given name Roddy meaning spirited or fierce
Roderick Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of the personal name Rhydderch, originally a byname meaning "reddish brown".
Roe Irish
Derived from/Anglicised form of 'Ruagh', an Irish word meaning redhead, or red haired
Rogan Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruadhagáin ‘son of Ruadhagán’, a personal name from a diminutive of ruadh ‘red’.
Roney Irish, Manx
Irish variant and Manx form of Rooney.
Rooney Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruanaidh "descendant of Ruanadh", a byname meaning "champion".
Rorke Irish
The name comes from the Gaelic O Ruairc, which means descendant of Ruairc.
Rosevear Cornish, English
From the name of a Cornish village near St Mawgan which derives from Celtic ros "moor, heath" and vur "big".
Rosewarne Cornish
Cornish locational origin from Ros(e)warne, an estate in the parish of Camborne. The name derives from the Breton "ros" meaning a hill(ock), usually one where heather grows, plus the Anglo-Norman French "warrene", a piece of land for breeding game.
Rosser Welsh
Variant of Prosser.
Rourke Irish
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruairc ‘descendant of Ruarc’, Old Gaelic Ruadhrac, a personal name from Norse Hrothrekr (see Roderick)... [more]
Ruadhagin Irish
Meaning, ‘son of Ruadhagán.’
Rush Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruis "descendant of Ros", a personal name perhaps derived from ros "wood". In Connacht it has also been used as a translation of Ó Luachra (see Loughrey).
Rushe English, Irish
Variant of Rush
Saise English, Welsh
From the welsh ‘sais’ meaning ‘englishman’.
Salaün Breton, French
Form of the given name Solomon.
Saldrim Irish
Means "One who knows".
Sancti Celtic (Latinized, Archaic)
Sancti or Santi is a Italian surname in the north of Italy, Cisalpine Gaul or Galia Citerior also known as Galia Togata. It's a last name belonging to ancient Celtic tribes.
Sankey English, Irish
Habitational name from a place in Lancashire, which derived from the name of an ancient British river, perhaps meaning "sacred, holy." ... [more]
Santiais Celtic (Latinized, Modern, Rare, Archaic), Old Celtic
Santiais is a surname of the Celtic origin (it's Cisalpine Gaul / Gallia Citerior, therefore, it's Italian-Celts, Italo-Celtic, Italo-Alpine). It meaning saint (sacred or holy)... [more]
Santy Celtic (Latinized, Modern)
It means saint, sacred or holy. In the Gaelic language is sanctaidd.
Scanlan Irish
Anglicized form of Irish-Gaelic Ó Scannláin
Scanlon Irish
Anglicized form of Ó Scannláin.
Scannell Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Scannail, meaning "Descendant of Scannal," a name meaning "contention"
Scannláin Irish
The name originally appeared in Gaelic as Ó Scannláin or Mac Scannláin, which are both derived from the word scannal. which means "contention."
Scarry Irish
Shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Scurra, meaning ‘descendant of Scurra’, a personal name of uncertain origin.
Scurlock Welsh, Irish
Obscure, probably derived from 'ystog', a Welsh word meaning 'fortress'
Scurry Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Scoireadh, meaning ‘descendant of Scoireadh’.
Seay Scottish, Irish
Of uncertain origin and meaning.
Seoighe Irish
Irish version of the surname Joyce
Seth Scottish, Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Sithigh or Ó Síthigh (see Sheehy).
Shaddy Irish
Origin unidentified. Perhaps a variant of Irish Sheedy.
Shady English, Irish
Origin unidentified. Possibly Irish or English.
Shanahan Irish
Anglicised form of Ó Seanachain.
Shanley Irish
Shortened form of MacShanley.
Shay Irish
Variant of Shea.
Shee Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of O'Shea.
Sheehan Irish (Anglicized, Archaic)
From irish "O Siodhachain" meaning "descendant of Siodhach" - peaceful or gentle, courteous.
Sheehey Irish
Variant of Sheehy.
Sheene Irish (Anglicized)
Derived from the Gaelic siodhach which means "peaceful." Most commonly used in Ireland and originated in the county's southwest region.
Sheeran English, Irish
Shortened form of O'Sheeran.
Shelley English, Irish
From the given name Shelley It means "wooded clearing" in Irish.
Sherlock English, Irish
Nickname for someone with "fair hair" or "a lock of fair hair."
Shields Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Siadhail
Shimmin Manx
contracted form of McSimeen
Shivers Irish
Irish variant of Chivers.
Siân Welsh
Either a variant of Siôn or taken directly from the name Siân
Siencyn Welsh
Welsh form of Jenkins.
Silk English, Irish
English: metonymic occupational name for a silk merchant, from Middle English selk(e), silk(e) ‘silk’. ... [more]
Sineath English, Irish
Variant of Sinnott. Not to be confused with the Irish first name Sinéad.
Sinnott English, Irish
From the medieval personal name Sinod (from Old English Sigenōth, literally "victory-brave").... [more]
Siobhán Irish
From the given name Siobhán.
Siôn Welsh
From the given name Siôn
Sionóid Irish
Gaelicization of Sinnott.
Skelly Irish
Anglicization of the Gaelic O Scolaidhe, which means student.
Skerry Irish
Variant of Scarry or Scurry.
Slattery Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Irish (Munster): reduced form of O’Slattery, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Slat(ar)ra ‘descendant of Slatra’, a byname meaning "robust", "strong", "bold".
Smalley English, Cornish (?)
Locational surname from places in Derbyshire and Lancashire, so called from Old English smæl ‘narrow’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’. This may also be a Cornish name with an entirely separate meaning.
Smullen Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Smolláin, according to Patrick Woulfe, a variant of Ó Spealáin (see Spillane).
Somerville Scottish, Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Scottish (of Norman origin) habitational name, probably from Graveron Sémerville in Nord, named with the Germanic personal name Sigimar (see Siemer) + Old French ville ‘settlement’... [more]
Spages Irish
Most likely an Irish surname. It was used in the 1976 movie Alice, Sweet Alice.
Spargo Cornish
Cornish: habitational name from Higher or Lower Spargo, in the parish of Mabe, so named from Cornish spern ‘thorn bushes’ + cor ‘enclosure'.
Spelling English, Irish, Jewish
Occupational name for a scholar, speaker or a story teller, derived from Middle English spellan meaning "to tell or relate". It could also be a variant of Irish Spillane or Jewish Spellman... [more]
Spillane Irish
Irish: reduced form O’Spillane, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Spealáin or ‘descendant of Spealán’, a personal name representing a diminutive of "speal" "‘scythe’"... [more]
Splain Irish
Irish: reduced form of Spillane.
St Leger Irish, English
Anglo-Irish surname, from one of the places in France called Saint-Léger, which were named in honour of St. Leodegar.
Stockard Scottish Gaelic, Dutch
Scottish: occupational name for a trumpeter, Gaelic stocaire, an agent derivative of stoc ‘Gaelic trumpet’. The name is borne by a sept of the McFarlanes.... [more]
Stohoke Irish
Gaelic name that originated in Ireland.
Stokes Irish, Scottish
Variant of Stoke and Stohoke... [more]
Stoneking Cornish, Medieval Cornish
The surname Stoneking was first found in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273. The name originates in Cornwall, deriving from the Old English word 'stan', meaning stone, and indicates that the original bearer lived near a prominent stone.
Summerly Irish
From Irish Gaelic Ó Somacháin "descendant of Somachán", a nickname meaning literally "gentle" or "innocent".
Swain Scottish, Irish, English
Northern English occupational name for a servant or attendant, from Middle English swein "young man attendant upon a knight", which was derived from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant, attendant"... [more]
Sweeny Irish
Irish variant spelling of Sweeney.
Sylvers Irish
Variant of Silvers.
Tallant English (British, ?), Norman, Irish
English (of Norman origin) occupational name for a tailor or nickname for a good swordsman, from taillant ‘cutting’, present participle of Old French tailler ‘to cut’ (Late Latin taliare, from talea ‘(plant) cutting’)... [more]
Talley Irish (Anglicized)
Shortend anglicized form of Ó Taithligh.
Tallon English, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare Talbot) or as an independent byname... [more]
Teare Manx
Manx form of McIntyre, from Manx "mac y teyr" and Irish "mac an tSaoir" meaning "son of the craftsman"
Theodulf Irish (?)
The name means "Wolf God" or "Wolf of Gods Blood".... [more]
Thomason Welsh, English
Means "son of Thomas".
Thulis Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Timmons Irish
Reduced anglicisation of Gaelic Mac Toimín meaning "son of Toimín" (a pet form of Tomás, itself a Gaelic form of Thomas)... [more]
Timoney Irish (Gallicized)
The name Timoney is an Irish name. It originated in the west of Ireland. In Irish it is O'Tiománaí. Tiománaí means driver in Irish.
Toal Irish
Irish
Tolan Irish
Recorded as O' Tolan, O' Twolan, Toland, Toolan, Toolin, apparently Thulis, possibly on some occasions O' Toole, and probably others, this is an ancient Irish surname of very confusing origins... [more]
Toland Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Tomás Spanish, Portuguese, Irish
From the given name Tomás.
Toner Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
An anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic surname, O'Tomhrair. Still used in the modern day Republic of Ireland, and relatively common in Atlantic Canada.
Toohey Scottish Gaelic
Modern form of the ancient pre 10th century Gaelic O' Tuathaigh meaning the descendant of the chief.
Tooker Irish
Variant of Tucker.
Toolan Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Toolin Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Toomey Irish
from ancient Gaelic personal name 'Tuama', probably derived from 'tuaim', meaning a hill or a small mountain
Toran Galician, Irish
Galician (Torán): habitational name from the village of Santa María de Torán in Ourense province.... [more]
Torrence Scottish, Irish
Scottish and northern Irish habitational name from either of two places called Torrance (one near East Kilbride, the other north of Glasgow under the Campsie Fells), named with Gaelic torran ‘hillock’, ‘mound’, with the later addition of the English plural -s.... [more]
Totum Irish (Rare)
from the word "totem" meaning sign. Or from Irish 'titim' meaning 'fall'.
Toupin French, Breton, Norman
nickname from Old French toupin "spinning-top". in rare instances in the south probably from Old Occitan toupin "small earthenware pot" used as a metonymic occupational name for a potter.
Trahan French (Cajun), Welsh
From the Welsh name Trahern, derived from the Welsh family seat Trehaverne.
Trainor Irish
Reduced form of McTraynor, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Thréinfhir "son of Tréinfhear", a byname meaning "champion, strong man" (from tréan "strong" and fear "man").
Trebilcock Cornish
Means "person from Trebilcock", Cornwall (apparently "dear one's farmstead"). The final -ck is standardly silent.
Tregarthen Cornish
From Tregarthen in Ludgvan; from treg-ar-den the dwelling upon the hill, or treg-arth-en, the dwelling upon the high place.... [more]
Tregory Cornish (Anglicized, Rare), English (Rare)
This obscure British surname is a variant form of Tregury, which is an anglicization of the rare Cornish surname Tregurtha.... [more]
Tregurtha Cornish
A rare Cornish surname that derives its name from either the manor of Tregurtha in the parish of St. Hilary (located in west Cornwall) or from the hamlet of Tregurtha Barton in the parish of St. Wenn (located in central Cornwall)... [more]
Trelawny Cornish
A habitational surname that originated in Cornwall.
Tremaine Cornish
Variant of Tremayne. A famous fictional bearer is Lady Tremaine, the main antagonist of Disney's Cinderella (1950).
Tremayne Cornish
Name for someone from any of various locations called Tremayne (or Tremaine), from Cornish tre meaning "home, settlement, town" and men meaning "stone".
Trevelyan Welsh, Cornish
Derived from Welsh tref "village, settlement" or Cornish trev "farmstead, town" combined with the given name Elyan.
Trevithick Cornish
Means "person from Trevithick", the name of various places in Cornwall ("farmstead" with a range of personal names). It was borne by British engineer Richard Trevithick (1771-1833), developer of the steam engine.
Trewin Cornish
Habitational name from Trewin in Cornwall.
Trezise Cornish
Means "person from Trezise or Tresayes", Cornwall ("Englishman's farmstead").
Troy Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Troighthigh "descendant of Troightheach", a byname meaning "foot soldier".
Tuíneán Irish
Meaning, "watercourse."
Tully Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Taithligh "descendant of Taithleach", a byname meaning "quiet", "peaceable".
Tully Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Maol Tuile "descendant of the devotee of the will of God" (from toil "will of God").
Turcotte French, Welsh
Means "tower" in French and Welsh.
Tuttle English, English (American), Irish
Derived from the Old Norse given name Þorkell, derived from the elements þórr (see Thor) and ketill "cauldron". The name evolved into Thurkill and Thirkill in England and came into use as a given name in the Middle Ages... [more]
Tweed Irish
Variant of Tuite.
Tyrone Irish
probably a habitational name from the county of Tyrone (Gaelic Tir Eoghain "land of Owen") in Ulster.
Ungoed Welsh
Derived from Welsh un "one" and coed "a wood".
Uniacke Irish
Unknown meaning.
Union English, Irish
A notable bearer is Gabrielle Union, an actress.
Urie Scottish, English, Irish
From the Scottish Fetteresso parish, Kincardineshire. May mean someone who is brave and loud.
Valiant English, Scottish, Irish
Derived from Old French vaillant meaning "heroic, courageous".
Vaughen Welsh
Variant of Vaughan.
Venn Welsh
at the "fen" or "bog"
Verran Cornish
Perhaps means "person from Treverran", Cornwall (from Cornish tre "farmstead" with an unknown second element), or "person from Veryan", Cornwall ("church of St Symphorian").
Vila Celtic
It means village or small town. In the Gaelic languaje is pentref or bentref.
Wakeham English, Cornish
A locational surname for someone who lived in one of three places called Wakeham in various parts of England, including Cornwall and/or Devon.
Walch Irish
Variant of Walsh.
Waldron Medieval German, Old Norman, Scottish Gaelic, English (British)
Derived from the German compound wala-hran, literally "wall raven", but originally meaning "strong bird". Also derived from the Gaelic wealdærn, meaning "forest dwelling", thought to be derived from the Sussex village of Waldron... [more]
Wall Irish
Anglicized from of de Bhál, a Gaelicized form of de Valle (see Devall).
Walsch Irish
Variant of Walsh.
Walshe Irish
Variant spelling of Walsh.
Wathers Irish
The surname originated in Donegal, Ireland. MacConuisce was an Anglicized form of o'hUisce. Uisce translates to water in English. Wathers is a rather uncommon name because it is an untraditional way of spelling Waters... [more]
Weale Welsh
A Welsh name, quite rare.
Weir Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Mhaoir "son of the steward or keeper".
Weir Irish
Anglicized form, based on an erroneous translation (as if from Gaelic cora "weir", "stepping stones"), of various Gaelic names such as Ó Corra (see Corr) and Ó Comhraidhe (see Curry).
Welsh Irish
Variant of Walsh.
Wilgar Irish
An ancient surname of Olde English and Scottish origins. It is usually occupational for a textile fuller, deriving from the pre 7th century word wealcere, meaning to walk or tread.
Windham English, Irish (Anglicized)
English habitational name from Wyndham in West Sussex, near West Grinstead, probably named from an unattested Old English personal name Winda + Old English hamm ‘water meadow’; or from Wymondham in Leicestershire and Norfolk, named from the Old English personal name Wigmund (see Wyman) + Old English ham ‘homestead’... [more]
Wogan Irish
From the Old Welsh personal name Gwgan or Gwgon, originally probably a nickname meaning literally "little scowler". (Cf. the second element in Cadogan.) This surname is borne by Irish radio and television presenter Terry Wogan (1938-).
Woodlock Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
Woosencraft Welsh
though this surname has an exotic look & attracts legends, it has it's origins in the Lancashire place name Wolstencraft, from elements Wulfstan (personal name) + croft ("enclosure")
Woulfe English, Irish
English: variant spelling of Wolf. ... [more]
Wrinn Irish (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Ó Rinn "descendant of Rinn", a personal name perhaps based on reann "spear".
Wyn Welsh, English
English: from the Old English personal name and byname Wine meaning ‘friend’, in part a short form of various compound names with this first element. Welsh: variant of Gwynn.
Wynd Scottish, Irish
Scotland or Ireland not sure of original origin. There was a childe Wynd some type of royal who slayed a dragon type thing worm or something and a Henery Wynd who was a mercenary in a battle at north inch in Scotland
Wynn Welsh, English
The surname Wynn ,(also spelled Winn, and Gwynn), is derived from the Welsh element, Gwynn, which can loosely be translated as "white" or "fair". It features in the name of the North Welsh kingdom of Gwynedd, (meaning "white head" or "white land")... [more]
Yaw Irish, English, Chinese
Irish: reduced and altered Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Eochadha Chinese : Cantonese variant of Qiu.
Yeager English, Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of German Jäger.
Yorath Welsh
Derived from the Welsh given name Iorwerth.
Youngkin Scottish (?), Irish (?)
Possibly derived from Younkin; A Strathclyde-Briton family from the Scottish/English Borderlands was the first to use the surname Younkin. It is a name for a person who was very young, from the Old English word yong and yung... [more]